7 results for Creative work, 2013

  • Kirihaehae

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    A haka composed about moko. My grand aunt Tangiwai took the moko chin tattoo so when the man from Tauranga, Kōraurau Te Kani that she had been betrothed to arrived at Whitianga Bay on the East Coast of the Bay of Plenty, he would readily recognise her his intended bride to be. This haka was composed for Te Kapa Haka o Tūtawake. This composition will be performed at the Mātaatua Kapa Haka regional Competition in Ruatoki 2016.

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  • Tāwharautia Aotearoa

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    Tāwharautia Aotearoa was composed in opposition to the National Governments attempt to remove Section 9 of the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi which would give the Government power to sell State assets. Performed by Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti at the Te Matatini World Championship Kapa Haa Competition 2013.

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  • Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti Kapa Haka

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013-02-21)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    Te Matatini is the World Champion Competition. Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti; Pool performance on Day 1 of the Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Competition. Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti placed second in the pool and qualified for the Top 9 Finals on Sunday 24th February 2013. Overall in the Pool qualifiers ŌpōTiki Mai Tawhiti placed 5th out of 41.

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  • Kōkō Kehe

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013-11-11)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    This composition placed first in the Poi Composition section. Kōkō Kehe; this composition is about a fish species namely the Kehe. This composition talks about the appearance of this fish it has grennstone pounamu like colour and a moko tattoo pattern like that of a Māori male. It can only be caught on certain nights by a scoop net of kōkō. March is when the kehe is in its best condition to eat. The best relish for the kehe when eaten is a kūmara. This composition was performed by Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti at the Te Matatini World Championship Kapa Haka 2015.

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  • Te Whakatōhea Maurua

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    Te Whakatōhea Maurua is a Whakaeke item that was composed to commemorate the rangatira of Te Whakatōhea that lost their lives in the colonial wars of the mid nineteenth century at the hands of the Te Arawa people who were loyalists to the Crown. This composition was composed also to bury the hatchet between Te Whakatōhea and Te Arawa. This composition was performed by Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti at the Te Matatini World Championship Kapa Haka Competition 2013

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  • Poi Apakura

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2013)

    Creative work
    University of Waikato

    Poi Apakura portrays the battles both pre European contact through to the land wars and the confiscation of 400,000 acres of Te Whakatōhea land s in 1865 with the killing of the missionary Rev Catl Volkner known as Te Wākana. Performed by Ōpōtiki Mai Tawhiti at the Te Matatini World Championship Kapa Haa Competition 2013.

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  • Suicide Pavilions

    Esling, S; Chon, C (2013-12-05)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artworks ‘Suicide Pavilions’ is a collaborative exhibition of new work between Auckland-based artists Simon Esling and Clara Chon comprising works on paper, a photograph, printed suicide notes and objects. The suicide pavilions themselves are delicate watercolour, ink, and pencil works on paper depicting contemplative spaces for those who harbour the thought of suicide. Central to these pieces is the idea spoken by the protagonist, Harry, in Herman Hesse’s 'Steppenwolf', ‘that to call suicides only those who actually destroy themselves is false’. Instead, it is the tension within the deliberation of suicide - the avoidance of suicide while holding the thought of it - that Esling and Chon have chosen to explore. The architectural atmosphere of Esling’s imagined illustrations plays on the contrasting aspects of the interior and exterior, and their accompanying structural connotations: lightness, darkness - the flow from one place to another (from one state of mind to the next), as well as their ability to elicit a general ambience or mood. In the drawings and suicide notes (which are both real and imagined) Esling captures those fleeting moments of relief, and inevitably, of falling shadow. The selected sculptural objects suggest something more visceral - they become the tangible points for the physical expression of the psychological friction of the suicide. With its requisite holes and straps, Chon’s crafted leather harness speaks to both the freedom and restraint inherent in the mind of the suicide, where a simultaneous desire exists to be freed from one world, yet remain in it. - Jamie Hanton, Director

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