216 results for Creative work

  • Seaunsea : An Interactive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Ramsgard-Thomsen, M; MacDonald, A; Mannion, M; Mottram, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction - Carol Brown Architecture and Interactive Design - Mette Ramsgard Thomsen Sound Design - Alastair MacDonald Programming - Chiron Mottram Lighting Design - Michael Mannion Premiered Dance Umbrella London, SeaUnSea was an evolving interactive performance for three dancers moving in response to and affecting a virtual seascape.Core to its development was the making of an intuitive interface through which the dancers could affect and respond to the digital scenography. Using a camera interface, mounted above the stage, the dancers are seen by a swarm of intelligent agents that navigate their way through a virtual space. The agents can be understood as a swarm of digital beings that interact with each other as well as react to changes in their environment. As they seek to navigate the plane, drawn by defined points of attraction, they are hindered by shades of darkness (the dancers digital shadow). In this way ‘the agents’ encounter the performers, at times evading, at times following and at other times being curious about their presence. The digital agents form vivid colour fields, assembling and dissolving creating cloud-like patterns around the performer/participant.Other artists exploring particle streams to extend the trace-form of the dancer include Trisha Brown, however this research as developed in SeaUnSea is original in its extension of this technology through the layering of a mesh architecture which embeds the time-based trace of the dancers’ presence.

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  • The Breath Moved Upon the Face of the Waters

    Matthews, Stephen; Nunns, R (2008)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Water is universally seen to symbolise the source of life, an elemental vehicle for cleansing and a facilitator of regeneration. To immerse on-self in the waters and to re-emerge without having been utterly dissolved in them . . . is to return to the well springs and regain fresh strength from that vast reservoir of the potential. A Dictionary of Symbols, Jean Chevalier and Alain Gheerbrant. The title refers to the ‘face’ or surface of the water, an intersection between air and water which when breathed upon acts as a point of interchange. This metaphor of intersecting elements resonates throughout the proposed piece, for example the exchange of cross cultural references and the constant interplay between both visual and audio images. The piece drew from images, sounds and beliefs associated with the pristine fresh water site Te Waikoropupu. The piece follows on from recent work and composition processes that reference elemental and natural symbolism, for example ‘The Bone Song’ and ‘A moon that you could hang your coat on’. The musical texture of the electro acoustic component was primarily constructed from short edited and processed samples of close miked musical and environmental sounds amplified to create a sound world that will function like an explorative audio microscope beckoning the listener to intersect the reflective surface of the known and travel further. The intention was to enlarge the auditory perception of minute sounds using specialist sound recording techniques (in particular close miking) and sound manipulation (sound design techniques). One of the specific aims of this project was to create a bi-cultural work, a cross-cultural exchange between Maori and European traditions. The piece being site specific (a reserve and natural spring), is particularly pertinent as there is presently as intense dialogue taking place as each culture seeks to assert and redefine its own unique relationship to the land – whenua, the rivers, lakes and sea. The title for the project is a quote from the book of Genesis. Not only does this excerpt contain the core imagery and central metaphor of the proposed creative work, it intentionally acknowledges significant spiritual cross-cultural links in particular the employment by Nineteenth Century Maori prophets of biblical imagery in a bid to help their people survive the spreading tide of European colonialism.

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  • Leo Bensemann: A Fantastic Art Venture

    Simpson, Peter; Waite, N

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition, eight years in the planning, had the misfortune to open one week before the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake; the exhibition was immediately taken down and never went up again – the Christchurch Art Gallery has still not reopened. Although in my book Fantastica: The World of Leo Bensemann (NRO1) I covered the whole of Bensemann’s career, in the exhibition I took responsibility for the paintings (portraits and landscapes) , while Dr. Noel Waite (University of Otago) looked after Bensemann’s graphic work, book design and printing. This was the most extensive exhibition of Bensemann’s work ever mounted and together with Fantastica will compel a major reassessment of his place in New Zealand culture. Art New Zealand wrote of it: ‘The exhibition (including more than 100 items) is significant in bringing together what has in the past appeared disparate and unrelated; here Bensemann's entire oeuvre - the output of a painter, illustrator, calligrapher, typographer, designer and publisher is given equal billing. Although this exhibition is an important re-assessment and valuable for a new generation unfamiliar with his work, a national touring show would have precipitated an even greater awareness’.

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  • Reactive Architecture-Smart Buildings respond to the Environment

    RIEGER, U

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition takes us into a possible future. Architects, engineers and designers are all looking for ways to save energy and make buildings more sustainable. These six installations look at some new and exciting ideas. Some of them look to nature – who would think that a dragonfly’s wing held some possible answers? One explores ‘people power’; several show how buildings can be built to respond to changing weather or even just the comings and goings of people going about their business. And an international design project being worked on here could mean that New Zealand has the first Passive House in the southern hemisphere.

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  • Releasing the angel

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2011)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer of 5 original orchestral works. Co-producer of CD A CD of 5 orchestral works recorded in a studio recording by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra conducted by Kenneth Young, includes Releasing the angel, Peregrinations, Other echoes, These arms to hold you, Len Dances Cited as one of 10 Best Classical CDs of 2011, NZ Listener, 17th December 2011, Dando, I, Le Cocq, J Cited as one of Top 10 Classic CDs for Christmas, NZ Herald, 17th December 2011, Dart, W.

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  • For Love Not Money

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    FOR LOVE NOT MONEY is intended to present a timely reflection on the state of contemporary art production, presentation and reception during a period of world financial crisis. It also encapsulates a reflection of the status of printmaking within the hierarchy of contemporary art practice and production. Continuing a process started in previous triennials the 15th Triennial will present art works made using a range of mechanical and digital reproduction and print techniques, including camera and computer based technologies.

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  • Crystal Spirit

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Celebrate Choi Jeong Hwa's Flower Chandelier

    Lee, Pei-Jung

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This piece was choreographed to respond to Choi Jeong Hwa's Flower Chandelier which was commissioned by the Auckland Art Gallery for their New Gallery. The concept of his work is to create life like flowers,focused on the simpleness and beauty. Besides responding to Choi Jeong Hwa's work, the dance celebrated the diversity of rich cultures in New Zealand through multi-cultural dancers who performed contemporary dance choreography with Maori traditional music accompanied by live musician.

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  • Breathe, an electroacoustic work

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2010)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer Flautist Programme Note Breathe was commissioned by Irish flautist Bill Dowdall and features the sounds of him performing on both bass and sliding headjoint flutes. The other sonorities are vocalisms made by a young Italian visual artist, Alice Grassi, I met while we were both Associate Artists at the Atlantic Centre for the Arts in Florida in 2010. I was taken with her lilting voice and made many recordings. Breathe is an amalgam of breath, voice and flute sounds in a sensuous and suggestive interplay. It is included on the Atoll CD Breathe, new notes for flute from Ireland & New Zealand (ACD 111).

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  • host for SATB choir

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-06-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer of the original composition Robert Wiremu: conductor I was delighted to be asked to write host for Karen Grylls’ Auckland Chamber Choir. My first choral work written at her request was Chaos of delight III, a vocal soundscape of avian sonorities for women’s voices. host is also abstract, based not on a text, but on the Vowel Clock used to train choral singers. The whole work is based on the note A and its upper partials and as the singers move around the space, various harmonics from the chord are heard. The title refers to the movement of birds in formation, often called a host. Commissioned by Robert Wiremu for Karen Grylls's 30 year anniversary conducting the Auckland Chamber Choir

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  • Opera Scenes

    Camp, Gregory

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Gregory Camp, director The University of Auckland School of Music voice class presents a series of scenes from a variety of operas, directed by Dr Gregory Camp.

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  • 'The selfish gene' exhibited in the National Contemporary Art Award 2014 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Rees, Judge “I remember looking at dog-shit on the pavement and suddenly I realised, there it is – this is what life is like. Strangely enough it tormented me for months… I think of life as meaningless; but we give meaning during our own existence. We create certain attitudes which give it meaning while we exist, though they in themselves are meaningless, really.” – Francis Bacon, interview with David Sylvester, 1975.

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  • 'Triage' exhibited in the Parkin Drawing Prize 2015 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dick Frizzell, Judge

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  • Future Islands: New Zealand Exhibition, Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

    Waghorn, Kathy; Walker, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Te Parapara Garden

    Bonica, Dante; Puke, Wiremu

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Parapara Garden is the only garden of its type in a major city with traditional structures and food crops that are now extremely rare and outside of a museum setting. Dante played a very important role in almost all facets of the project during the entire duration of project as an adviser and contributor which included: Kokowai advice, preparation and application for all carved structures are believed to be the only structures entirely painted with Kokowai in Aotearoa and outside of a museum setting. The images of carvings attached to this NRO shows kokowai aplication as described from the early accounts. He carved the taumata atua for the tuahu. The patterns carved are from ancient taumatua atua from Waikato. He sourced and gathered obsidian from Taupō for customary usages at Te Parapara including preparing and installing the flaked obsidian eyes for parata-toi moko located at the rear of the pātaka. He prepared all the cordage for the pātaka, whatarangi and ruakūmara. He sourced, gathered and prepared kiekie roots and worked them inot the structural lashings for the pātaka. He sourced, gathered and prepared totara bark for thatching, and employed ancient thatching techiques for the pātaka, kāuta and ruakūmara. He manufactured replica agricultural implements from stone and wood for the māra kūmara He conducted the additional research on traditional lashing techniques to ensure the work's authenticity. He manufactured the feather wig for the tekoteko of the main pātaka. He gave a demonstration of Hika ahi (fire making) as part of the main opening of the Te Parapara Garden.

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  • Talking my way through culture (curated solo exhibition and exhibition catalogue)

    Smith, Jill

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tuku Iho, Legado vivo Māori—NZMACI exhibition in South America

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Te Mahou: Ko Te Matatini

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B. author of catalogue

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  • Front Load

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Art Unlimited, Art Basel 93

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Integration of computing, multi-media and internet methods and techniques into contemporary art practice, will continue to be a focus in the current project. Using interactive and multi-media techniques in art disciplines effectively involves understanding and experimenting with the integration and interfacing of, computer generated material into the installation. The computer can act as a technical programmable interface either in the local scene of audio/visual disjunction or across a computer-based net installation to allow interaction that is not necessarily tied to specifics of time or place. Disjunction of object and reader happens across not only layered meanings and intentions but across disparate media and dislocated net-based media, further challenging the viewer/object-site interchange. Voices or positions are placed in opposition through the programming of voice and sound tracks. During the course of their programmed discussion, an enormous diversity of subjects is forced into a communal relationship through sound. These sound-subjects are utterances – voices with ideas, voices with beliefs, voices with conviction and meaning. Amplified in the exhibition space, they are in a state of literal disharmony, interfering and overlapping, out of sync and disagreeable. In addition, their words are foreign to each other; not just in geography, culture or religion, but also in subjects as diverse as art, science, philosophy, religion and cult activity. In their forced cohabitation, individual positions and meanings are somehow cancelled out as sound and idea compete for attention. Other specific areas addressed in this project will include • Newspapers, periodicals and tabloids as forms of mass dissemination. • Installation as identity – installation, publication and the archiving of societal events. • Aleatoric scripting – random sonic phenomena using statistical procedures

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