216 results for Creative work

  • International Akaroa Music Festival 2016

    Salzmann, Edith

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artistic Director of the festival. Gave a masterclass for 16 cello students from NZ and abroad as well as designed and performed in a concerts series with 9 professional and 14 student concerts. The 2016 international guest artists were Prof. Peter Hoerr, cello, Prof. Elisabeth Kufferath, violin and NZ concert masters Andrew Beer (APO) and Yuka Eguchi (NZSO).

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  • FLUTE FEST CONCERT; Uwe Grodd, performer and conductor flute choir; Schubert 'Staendchen', Hiroshi 'Ocean'

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Flautist and Conductor Final concert of flute Fest '16 including a flute choir of 16 players

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  • Kei konei koe: ō Tapuwae ki Tāmaki Makaurau - You Are Here: mapping Auckland

    Waghorn, Kathy; De Groot, C; Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The exhibition Kei konei koe: ō Tapuwae ki Tāmaki Makaurau You Are Here: mapping Auckland, took place in the Pictorial Gallery of the Auckland War Memorial Museum, 30 September, 2011 to 12 August, 2012. This exhibition was developed in partnership with Dr. Cris de Groot, Unitec Institute of Technology, a team of Unitec computing and product design students, and Kathy Waghorn from the School of Architecture and Planning at The University of Auckland. You Are Here explores 200 years of Auckland’s planning and evolution using 40 maps as the lens.

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  • Numerology and Territories

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In a commercial setting, you don't need to read the sign to get it. It works in your peripheral vision. You see its colour. There are so many stories that come from a shade of blue or the depth of a red [...] I'm interested in that meditative moment, when you're looking at a magazine or a billboard and you're emptying your mind. You just download whatever image it is and you're not even really processing it. Auckland based artist Jim Speers' current exhibition Numerology and Territories continues his interest in appropriating the language and materials of local industry. His text based works carefully select the names of companies that make us aware of the semantic construction of a brand. VeilSide, for instance, is a company that specialises in customising body work for sports cars. The capitalisation of the 'V' and 'S' exists in the original brand. However by lifting these words out of their original context and simplifying the type, Speers places emphasis on the poetic combination of words and the way they function in an urban setting.

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  • Colin McCahon The Titirangi Years 1953-1959

    Simpson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition included examples from all McCahon’s series between 1953 and 1959 including Towards Auckland (1953-54), Manukau (1954), Kauri (1953-57), Titirangi (1956-57), French Bay (1954, 1955, 1956-58), The Wake (1958, 16 panels shown in full) and the Elias Series (1959). It also included significant individual works such as I AM (1954), Let us possess one world (1954-55), Painting (1958), Cross (1959), and John in Canterbury (1959). Displayed in the very environment in which the works were painted, this exhibition enabled an unusually intimate response to McCahon’s painting during a crucial watershed period of his career, when he was first moving beyond landscape regionalism and figurative religious paintings towards more expansive modes influenced by international practice, especially abstraction. The exhibition of 42 works broke records for attendance at Lopdell House and was widely noticed in the media. It was directly associated with the refurbishment of the McCahon house in Titirangi and the establishment of a major residency in McCahon’s name, a project I participated in as Trustee of the McCahon House Trust.

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  • Douglas Lilburn, salutes to poets

    de Lisle, R; Major, D; Lilburn, D

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Roger Wilson, baritone ; Gillian Bibby, Paul Cibi, Rae de Lisle, piano ; José Aparicio, Christopher Leech, tenors ; Dean Major, violin ; Peter Barber, viola ; Dylan Lardelli, guitar ; Douglas Lilburn, narrator

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  • CMC

    Kerr, Sean; Cuming, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    "CMC", LIVE SOUND PERFORMANCE, SUPERDELUXE 17th BIENNALE OF SYDNEY, ARTSPACE, JULY 2ND, 2010 David Elliott, Artistic Director of the 17th Biennale of Sydney (2010), invited Simon Cumming and I to perform in the SuperDeluxe, Artspace program of of the Biennale. The 17th Biennale of Sydney, is a prestigious art event and was curated by artistic director David Elliott. Our performance event took place at Artspace, Sydney and was part of the Tokyo based SuperDeluxe programme coordinated by Mike Kubek, Director of SuperDeluxe. I performed to a capacity crowd with New Zealand sound artist; Simon Cuming and along side Japanese Sound Artists; Kazunao Nagata & Dai Yamamoto.

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  • Super music

    Kerr, SM

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    I was invited by director of Superdeluxe, Mike Kubek, to perform at Superdeluxe, Tokyo in June 2011. Superdeluxe is Tokyo’s most popular experimental performance space and has hosted major names such as Keiji Haino, Jim O'Rourke and Oren Ambarchi. I performed live, Super Music, which comprised: two laptops, 6 hand built sensor base instruments, and pure data and gem patches, and a 3x data projection. I performed along side local Japanese artists: nonSectRadicals, Cal Lyall (Palimpsest and curator of Test Tone), Nobunaga Ken and Takashi Azumaya, (previous curator of Tokyo's Mori Art Museum).

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  • Blind Glass

    Cherrie, Derrick

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    'Blind Glass' was a collection of works that drew their form and imagery from familiar every-day situations. The works employed a broad array of materials and pre-constructed objects, including: shelving, tables, household objects, sheets of particle board, plastic laminate, fibreglass, mirror and paint. There was a consistent reference throughout the exhibition to the body. The works have the potential to be read as bodily supports (furniture) and body substitutes (physical and psychic). They opened outwardly onto a socially indexed environment and inwardly through personal reflection. Like partial stage sets, the works are presented as traces of scenarios suggesting narrative. However, despite the apparent potential of subjective relations and what might be described a sculptural variant of narrative production, one would be hard put to summarize quite what story has been told. The sculptures occupy what might be described as a zone existing somewhere between the recognisable and familiar matters of their everyday qualities, and an almost dreamlike state of autonomous ideals and semantic absence. A key objective was to have the sculptures open onto a sense of an alterity in opposition to, yet emerging out of, the commonality of their more obvious indices.

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  • Te Arikinui for tenor, strings and percussion

    Royal, Charles (2010-04-14)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant. The current version was Zirst performed by the Waikato University Orchestra, conducted by Adam Maha. Howard McGuire, tenor. WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant.

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  • These arms to hold you: for children's voices and orchestra; text by Bill Manhire

    de Castro-Robinson, EK; Manhire, W (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer a work for orchestra and children's voices commissioned for the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra by the Royal NZ Plunket Society to celebrate its 100th anniversary. A collaboration with poet Bill Manhire from Victoria University.

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  • Through Coiled Stillness

    Holmes, Leonie (2011)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Original composition for unaccompanied SATB chamber choir. Premiere performance of "Through Coiled Stillness", a composition for SATB choir, written for Karen Grylls and the University of Auckland Chamber Choir for their tour of Singapore and England, 2011. Subsequent performances on tour in Singapore and England culminated in a recording in London on the CD "Magnificat" - a CD record of the tour by the National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries, University of Auckland.

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  • Signal

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Gow Langsford Gallery is pleased to present Signal: an exhibition of new work by James Cousins. His inaugural show with Gow Langsford, Cousins presents a body of painting that both draws from and expands on concepts explored in his earlier practice. Aligned with his early grid-based and recurring image works of the 1990s, Cousins recent work employs well-worn distant utopian landscape imagery, informed by the practice of Gerhard Richter, at the same time engaging with mechanistic-like process painting forging an entirely contemporary shift. At the heart of the works is a tension in the tenuous integration between the meeting of paintings material workings process and its illusional subject. Cousins earlier works offered a strong differentiation between the figurative, and the object, the filter or screen through which we are drawn to view the work. The new pieces introduce a more complex type of emergence: here, the abstraction and figuration are intertwined and enmeshed. Irresolvable tensions arise between the original form and the surface. Cousins states: The grid, once submissive to horizontality and verticality, now maps multiple events; the canvas is now a site of indeterminacy brimming with possibilitieswhilst continuing to exercise a form of homage to late modernist practices and processes, recent work exchanges end game reductivism for other possibilites. Morphed or corrupted logic reinvent the processes inherent in earlier work with a new divergence and opulence. Cousins process in creating the works employs both traditional and contemporary painting technologies. It is a labour-intensive, delicate and precise working of layers of paint and vinyl. A path of paint, created by the tipped canvas, initially determines the foreground pattern of large arcs. As such, the works are to a degree, self-determining. What appears to be entirely mechanistic is instead, a more complex mapping of the surface. The vinyl employed in this process, creates an artificial skin which is later peeled away to reveal the layers of paint beneath. While passages through to the background picturesque in the works can be glimpsed, the surface patterns of fractured colour seemingly form a wrinkle in the matrix and force the viewer into a double take. Though this process may be learned, the procedures employed at various levels fuse and begin to impose upon each other, reversing and exchanging established order. The un-learned order of the finished works create a mysterious and contemplative effect, evocative of a once necessarily romantic sublime that in a new age has collapsed in upon itself, promised utopias are exposed as a sham, in the construction of space for other beginnings.

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  • Exploded View

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In Gallery Two, Associate Professor Nuala Gregory from the Elam School of Fine Arts creates an immersive installation of printed and collaged works. Her art work draws on her investigations in art theory, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operated instead at the level of bodily sensation. The exhibition is accompanied by a 48 page full colour catalogue with essays by Dr Peter Shand and Gregory O’Brien.

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  • Cirrus

    Matthews, Stephen (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My role in the creation of this work was as the composer as well as the provision of complete parts to the NZSO including the addition of the final string bowings The title Cirrus is taken from the first stanza of James K. Baxter’s poem, High Country Weather (1948). Alone we are born And die alone Yet see the red-gold cirrus Over snow mountain shine Upon the upland road Ride easy stranger Surrender to the sky Your heart of anger What appealed was the depiction of individual endeavour, the expansive backdrop of New Zealand rural imagery and the poem’s final plea. Despite the foreboding beginning, metaphorically the ‘red-gold cirrus’ foretells of a change for the better. Cirrus are beautiful high transparent clouds typically streaming in the direction of the wind, usually signalling the arrival of fair weather. The opening of the piece employs high-pitched bell-like chords. While the upper and lower strings hold a sustained note, a bass clarinet introduces the first significant melodic theme. After the first full-orchestral climax the texture of the climax quickly dissipates to reveal a high-pitched modal melody. The brass abruptly interrupts this moment of quiet with an augmentation of the previous theme. After this interruption subsides the character of the music gradually becomes more uplifting and confident. Then solo instruments perform themes over a lively syncopated chromatic pizzicato bass line and variations of the original theme repeat, driving the music forward to reach the final climax. The piece ends with a final recapitulation of the high modal melody and arpeggiated echoes of the opening bell-like chords in the tuned percussion.

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  • Five past five at the Clock Tower: Exploring artistic spaces of the University

    Locke, Kirsten

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation in the form of a concert explores the aesthetic potential of the University of Auckland Clock Tower. Built in the early 20th Century architectural style of art nouveau during the 1920s, the Clock Tower was originally part of the university Arts Centre that officially opened in 1926. Now an administrative hub for staff and students, this concert reclaims the artistic intentions of the space through an a Capella choral performance that explores the notions of temporality and artistry through music. The concert draws on the enduring power of the Clock Tower as the literal heartbeat of the university, the timekeeper, and symbolic nexus of academia, creativity, and cultural power. Consisting of eleven singers drawn from staff at the university, alumni, and keen enthusiasts, we invite you to explore the intersection and artistic transformation of space, place and time at the university with us at Five Past Five at the Clock Tower.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: an LA dialogue

    Waghorn, Kathy; Haringa, H; Jones, R; Khoo, Chia Venn; Seung Kim, Sophia; Lapwood, A; Shake Lee, Z; Lin, S; Paget, V; Ryan, H; Yoo, A; Mecredy, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A piece of collective urban research on the Whau River, Auckland MUDDY URBANISM www.muddyurbanismlab.wordpress.com Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, has a unique geography, with an extensive coastline abutting urban areas. While architects, planners and politicians often discuss the importance of ‛the waterfront’, the view of this watery edge is frequently restricted to the inner city and the exclusive beach suburbs. However Auckland ‛fronts’ the water in many different ways and spaces, most of which are ignored in an urban sense. One such space is the Whau River estuary. The Whau River bisects the inner west of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Its path creates a portage, connecting two harbours, permitting the movement with waka (canoe) between the east and west coasts. This portage has seen over one thousand years of occupation and use. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production and in the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route for food and as a source of clay. In latter decades however, the Whau has lost its importance. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism is a special urban-research workshop at The School of Architecture and Planning (The University of Auckland) that engages in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment. This research project amplifies the local as a critical site of intervention for rethinking existing land use, public and environmental infrastructure, and neighbourhood-based socio-economic development, in order to re-imagine a productive coastline for the many different waterfronts of Auckland.

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  • Flotilla Whau, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Patel, N; Waghorn, Kathy; Bush, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Development of one day participatory event / socially engaged art work for the Rosebank Artwalk, curated by Marcus Williams as part of the Auckland Arts Festival. Commissioned as part of the Rosebank Art Walk (Auckland Arts Festival 2013) the Flotilla Whau was intended as a one-day event where a collection of water-craft traversed a marked course on the Whau river in Auckland, new Zealand. Situated as both art work and community development event, the flotilla brought river users together, stimulating connection and ongoing discussion. The intention of the flotilla was to mark out this marginal estuarine space, in some way drawing attention to it, and in so doing re-establishing the river as a visible,material space that can be occupied, a place one can be in and on. The Flotilla was repeated in 2014 as a stand alone event, with the number of participants increasing from 50 to 300. As a result of the success of these two events the Flotilla Whau was offered funding from Auckland Council for 2015, which allowed for the event to grow the performative spatial and visual components. The 2015 Flotilla Whau took place on Sunday February 8 in collaboration with the Voyager, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

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  • The Fluid City, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Waghorn, Kathy; Longley, Alys; Brown, C; Brierley, Gary; Fitzpatrick, Katrina; Sunde, Charlotte; Ehlers, C; Martin, Rosemary; Wood, Rebecca

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    collaborative research project funded through Transforming Cities The Fluid City project was initiated through a Transforming Cities research grant at the University of Auckland to promote inter-disciplinary urban research for sustainable futures. The premise of Fluid City is that the arts can play an important role in communicating issues of sustainability in novel ways that capture public imagination and provoke alternative understandings and visions of the city. Our motive for undertaking this collaboration was to produce new ways of disseminating hard science knowledge concerning the effects of the urban realm on fresh water catchments and the harbours with the diverse publics of Auckland. Our response then was to generate a mechanism to support a fluid approach to the sharing and exchange of water knowledge and to make a space for the close encounter with water from our urban streams, creeks and rivers.The Fluid City project is anchor-less and mobile, taking the form of three strange, translucent cupboard-like structures each towed by bicycle. Like a stream the bicycle powered Fluid City winds its way through the city’s streets, creating a sense of anticipation and wonder. It then temporarily occupies an urban space and garners the unsuspecting public as audience. The three cupboards open, releasing images, objects, performance, and between them creating a space to pause in the city. Each cupboard and its yellow-aproned attendant invites the passer-by to engage with water; to view, through a diver’s mask, a film showing the passage of water through the city; to don a lab coat and guided by a microbiologist see the usually invisible microbial universe of the city’s waterways, active, alive and full of creatures; to sit on an upturned bucket and listen through headphones to different voices sharing stories and knowledge of the city’s fluid states; to pick up a pen and write or draw your own memories and concerns about water on postcards and contribute this writing to a gently flapping washing line of thoughts; to follow characters through a dance and audio performance evoking the invisible stories of a reclaimed harbour through movement, poetry and sound. In 2013 the Fluid City project was invited to be part of the Rosebank Project (Auckland Arts Festival) which began with the premise that through a better knowledge of place, communities grow and that culture is the mechanism by which this occurs. The project was centered in the industrial precinct and suburban area of Rosebank Rd in Auckland, New Zealand, built over an estuarine peninsula of significant ecological worth and geological interest; the site of the oldest market gardens in Auckland. The Fluid City was adapted to work with the specific estuarine conditions of this local and was operational over the weekend of March 23-24, alongside the work of twenty-five designers, artists and collectives. The Rosebank Project was conceived and curated by Marcus Williams.

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  • that's obvious! that's right! that's true!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The collective et al. has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally to great acclaim. This exhibition continues their exploration of 'superfiction' by combining words, industrial furniture and video projections to create artworks that mirror political structures. The collective represented New Zealand at the 2005 Venice Biennale with its critically acclaimed installation the fundamental practice. Recent works have addressed fundamentalist practices and ideological schemes, and their impact on societies. The artists' approach is to use fiction and appropriation to mirror various political and belief structures. The work for Christchurch Art Gallery will continue this process of exploring aspects of super-fiction as conceptual and visual artworks.

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