216 results for Creative work

  • The Village: Solo exhibition (multiple venues)

    Hipkins, Gavin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Crown Coach Botanical

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The City of Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency commissioned “Crown Coach Botanical” for use in a planned public artwork and provided US $24,000 for its production. The series of twenty-eight ambrotype plates comprised a survey of the rich variety of plants clinging to the Crown Coach Brownfield, a polluted wasteland in downtown L.A. set for remediation. Following a solo exhibition at Two Rooms Gallery in 2008, John Hurrell wrote “these strange blurred and specked images are of plants …found in the Los Angeles region where she now lives. Looking at them is like going back in time a hundred and fifty years.” (Eyecontact 9/08). A full set of these photographs were acquired by the City of Los Angeles art collection. Several images from this series were included in my contribution to Altogether Elsewhere, a feature exhibition by curator Rob Tufnell at the Zoo Art Fair, 2009 alongside artists including Alighiero Boetti, Jim Lambie, Mungo Thomson, Gülsün Karamustafa, Mike Nelson and Richard Hughes.

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  • LA Botanical

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    LA Botanical is an ongoing project, massive and perhaps unachievable in its full potential scope, to document each plant that grows in Los Angeles for which there is a documented use - be it food, medicine, weapon, abortive, analgesic, fuel, stimulant, building material, deadly toxin or mind altering entheogen. The plants are documented as wet-plate Ambrotypes, an anachronistic photographic form ubiquitous the 1850's-1890s, the period during in which Los Angeles grew from a dusty town of 1400 inhabitants to a major metropolitan center. The project is an attempt to reconcile Campbell's own rural background with her life here in Los Angeles, one of the most sprawling and unsustainable metropolises on earth. LA Botanical operates simultaneously as map, inventory, and survival guide to the city of Los Angeles. It has the potential to reveal who lives here, from where they originate, what they value, how they eat, worship, heal, harm, travel, clothe themselves, seek insight or achieve oblivion. It also serves as a tool or guide - enabling its audience to see Los Angeles, not as a desiccated industrial wasteland into which resources must flow, but as a field of abundant life that might be harvested to satisfy our needs.

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  • Te Taniwha

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Taniwha is an ongoing collaborative project between Joyce Campbell and Historian Richard Niania (of Ngai Kohatu and Ngati Hinehika Hapu and Ngati Kahungunu Iwi), drawing on the mythology, history and ecology of Te Reinga and the Ruakituri Valley west of Wairoa where Campbell grew up. It traces the search for two great, serpentine water species: the Taniwha Hinekörako and the giant longfin eel and pays particular attention to the birth and life of a Puhi named Te Taniwha who was born into the war party of Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki around 1868 as they battled colonial troups in the Ruakituri valley. Joyce Campbell has been working onsite in a field darkroom to produce ambrotypes and daguerreotypes at Te Reinga, home of the Taniwha Hinekörako. Contemporary cameras do not lend themselves to the depiction of mystery. Digital cameras have made photography an increasingly descriptive medium and also one that is open to greater manipulation than ever before. By contrast, the nineteenth century techniques of ambrotype and daguerreotype provide the photographer with extraordinarily detail, depth and richness while also having an innate tendency to produce artifacts from silver and ether that are spontaneous, open to interpretation and often extraordinarily beautiful. Campbell has taken photographs of caves, gullies, pools and cascades but her hope is that in the silver we might catch a glimpse of the Taniwha as well.

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  • Front Load

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • TAG - Simon Ingram and James Cousins

    Cousins, James; Ingram, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A two-person exhibition featuring 4 works by each artist. The principle of the exhibition was such that points of formal and conceptual commonality in each artists' painting practice would be unpacked, analyzed and re-configured discursively through the playful and collaborative process of selecting and installing the works. These were not major works, but ones that represented experimental and oblique moments of discovery in each artist's practice and were not necessarily works either artist would ordinarily exhibit. The exhibition received a review on ArtForum online, on the Minus Space website and on a local art review website called eyecontact. See: http://www.gowlangsfordgallery.co.nz/exhibitions/pastexhibitions/2010/iniative1cousinsingram.asp

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  • Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce Danced, Part 1

    Kerr, Sean

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced, Part 1 covers Sean Kerr’s work through the period 2010-2000. It recognises the instability of media art, looking back to recreate previous works, exploiting the juxtaposition of past and present to illustrate potential trajectories between works. Whether delivered live in the mode of performance, completed by the active role of the viewer, upgraded to evade redundant technology, or the simple practicality of reconfiguring an installation for a new site, Kerr’s work refuses to be fixed in time through the process of a conventional retrospective. Taking place simultaneously at the Gus Fisher Gallery and Artspace, this exhibition is the first survey of Kerr’s work. One of New Zealand's leading digital artists, Kerr's interests lie in the emergent area of new media technologies, incorporating internet art, installation and sonic practices, but with a particular focus on the expectations and effects of interactivity. This often includes ill-mannered scenarios and ‘misbehaving’ machines that owe as much to communication theory as slapstick comedy, exploring both social and technological dynamics. Bruce danced coincides with the launch of a new book covering Kerr’s work from the early 1990s to the present day. The 160-page publication On the Nose, published by Clouds, is out in September. This exhibition and publication is supported by a National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries (NICAI) Research Development Fund.

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  • ...a tent, pitched in the wilderness

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    ‘A tent, pitched in the wilderness’, shown at prominent Sydney gallery Stills, features deserts, architecture and artifacts photographed in Egypt and European museums in late 2011. Inspired by Antarctica, this work identifies a visual and experiential correspondence between the deserts of hot and cold regions, yet acknowledges major differences in the impact of civilization: “Jenkinson’s photographs of / deserts [contain] phantom remains of past civilizations and intimations of possible futures”, Sydney Morning Herald. In highlighting the continuing relevance of the past, this work stands in contra-distinction to the current tendency to give primacy to the new and ever-present, e.g. the recent Egyptian uprising is shown as part of an historical continuum of conflict rather than an insolated incident, a point astutely unraveled by S. Rosenblum in the interview she conducted for East Sydney Radio.

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  • Fleet Light

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Fleet Light was my first exhibition at Stills, a leading Australian gallery (established 1991) representing artists working at the forefront of contemporary photo media practice. Significantly this was also my first show of exclusively digital lenticular prints, a process I first worked with in 2007. I consider this exhibition to be a major statement of both medium and concept; of this technically tricky distinctive medium with its elusive, shifting qualities, and its utilization in the the recreation of equally changeable lighting effects (as in auroae and mirages) and the optical nature of vision itself (such as afterimages). This show effectively links my Antarctica research with my ongoing interest in the colour theories of Johnnn von Goethe's, moving from atmospheric effects to optical effects, the latter that were to be further extended in the national touring exhibition Second Silence. This exhibition lead to further exhibitions at Stills and helped to reestablished my artistic reputation in Australia (further to the three major public shows I was invited to participate in between 1987 and 1999)

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  • Living Halls (Solo exhibition curated by Rhana Davenport)

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    LIVING HALLS is a growing collaborative archive. The paintings, drawings, honour boards, documents, database, photos, stories and audio recordings that make up this archive tell us about the war memorial halls of Aotearoa. Following the Second World War, New Zealanders wholeheartedly embraced the idea of constructing utilitarian memorials to honour soldiers killed in action instead of the ‘traditional’ monuments favoured after the First World War. Government subsidies encouraged the widespread building of community centres and halls as ‘living memorials’ for all to share. These were ‘monuments with an inside’1, conceptually complex spaces that were built by communities to symbolise their grief, but also to solve a practical need for a place to gather for everything from dancing to voting.

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  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.’ The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • architecture e + c work of elin+carmen corneil 1958 to 2008

    Milojevic, Paul

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    architecture e+c work of elin + carmen corneil 1958 to 2008 aims to give a sense of the scope, the composition and the particularity of the Corneil practice archive. From five decades of work and thousands of items, this sampling suggests some of the architects' main preoccupations. Originally proposed by the directors of the Canadian Architectural Archive (University of Calgary) in the late 90's when the material was acquired, the exhibition is meant to bring to light an unusual practice. The work presented shows an engagement in many fields: conceptual, goegraphic, programmatic...

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  • Snow Ball Blind Time

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Govett-Brewster is proud to announce the release of the highly anticipated publication Peter Robinson: Snow Ball Blind Time, a beautiful and enduring companion to the landmark exhibition of the same name, commissioned by and presented at the Gallery in 2008. More than an exhibition catalogue, Snow Ball Blind Time traces Robinson’s exploration of materials and ideas through the eight major projects since his formative ACK installation at Artspace, Auckland 2006, seen as a pivotal change of direction in his artmaking practice. Govett-Brewster Director Rhana Devenport, the book publisher and commissioner of the work says, “This new contribution to art publishing in Aotearoa registers one of the most conceptually powerful and physically arresting projects in recent times. Snow Ball Blind Time was an ephemeral art project entirely deserving of this attention.”

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  • Whare Tapere 2011

    Royal, Charles

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This day long event is a series of performances demonstrating the outcomes of experiments in mātauranga Māori inspired perfomring arts. It contains demonstrations of taonga pūoro, tākaro karetao, haka, waiata and kōrero.

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  • Polymer Monoliths

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand artist Peter Robinson was last seen at the IMA in 2005, exhibiting alongside Gordon Bennett in the exhibition Three Colours. There he offered his sceptical take on post-colonial art-and-identity politics. His recent work, however, leaves such issues behind, in what seems like an abruptly formalist about-face. He has moved away from illustrating political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, and toward playing with materials and exploring the resulting poetic nuances. He's been working with polystyrene—that mundane, everyday material of consumer excess. A non-biodegradable thermo-plastic, it cushions our electronic goods in transit and pollutes our foreshores. In Robinson's work, it is also a sculptural material of infinite possibility—lightweight yet massive, able to fill large spaces yet also to articulate delicate forms. Robinson pursues multiple lines of inquiry, as if, given polystyrene's association with disposability, any number of sculptural experiments could be explored, cast aside, and reworked. His work ranges from roughly hewn, lumpen forms to intricately carved, baroque ones. In our show, Robinson continues his recent exploration of the monolith. In conjunction with Artspace, Sydney; supported by Creative New Zealand, University of Auckland, and Brisbane's Urban Art Projects.

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  • Breaking boundaries (the unseen Strength)

    Lee, Pei-Jung

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to explore the unseen strength hidden within Asian women in the result of long term traditional values.

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  • the second of the ordinary practices & regroup, reorder, restore!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Site-specific installation linking art, technology, politcal ideologies, scientific theories, fringe religious practices and behavious modification. IMA receives major funding from Arts Queensland and the Australia Council and Artspace receives major funding from Creative New Zealand.

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  • Spirit of the Land (K Grylls, conductor) [CD recording]

    Grylls, Karen

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • NZ Youth Choir: Guest recital (Recital conductor)

    Grylls, Karen

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Super music

    Kerr, SM

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    I was invited by director of Superdeluxe, Mike Kubek, to perform at Superdeluxe, Tokyo in June 2011. Superdeluxe is Tokyo’s most popular experimental performance space and has hosted major names such as Keiji Haino, Jim O'Rourke and Oren Ambarchi. I performed live, Super Music, which comprised: two laptops, 6 hand built sensor base instruments, and pure data and gem patches, and a 3x data projection. I performed along side local Japanese artists: nonSectRadicals, Cal Lyall (Palimpsest and curator of Test Tone), Nobunaga Ken and Takashi Azumaya, (previous curator of Tokyo's Mori Art Museum).

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