216 results for Creative work

  • City of Earth

    Crowley, Lisa

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Now Colour, Now Shape, Now Paper

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • SLIP I'm not falling I'm just hanging on for as long you'll hold me Dance Theatre Work for Touch Compass

    Brown, Carol; Scoones, R; Ransley, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction by Carol Brown Music and Sound Design by Russell Scoones Costumes by Emma Ransley What if the stories we carry around with us were to focus upon the contingent and the accidental? What if we acknowledge chance and slippage as our condition? The research imperative was to create a performance work that represented the individual stories of the dancers through movement and text. Using spoken and sung texts the challenge was to create an experience that communicated their inner lives in an unsentimental way. By translating their stories into song and creating a five song cycle for the work the choreography was able to move between the individual and the group opening spaces for an unsentimental appreciation of their diverse experiences whilst seeking to challenge stereotypical assumptions about disability and intellectual impairment. In the process of creating this new work we explored flying and falling and the in-between state of suspension. Driven by a desire to expose the intimacy of support, and the possibilities of surrender, we flung, krumped, collapsed and caught. The dancers wrote titles for an album of songs about life changing moments, they dressed up and down, and danced out of memories, risking everything and still moving beyond the fear of falling. Because the past is all we know of the future, they roll with their ghosts and catch their breath with the other.

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  • Fossil Cairn - The Weight of Destiny

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Fossil Cairn deliberates on the scientific, ethical, and phenomenological meanings posed by the 176 fossil and mineral specimens found beside the bodies of Scott and his party on their ill-fated return from the South Pole, 1912. Central to the installation are my photos of these rocks (Natural History Museum collection, London) cut out and wall-mounted in a cairn-like shape 250x240 cm, reiterating the snow cairn raised over the bodies when found. This accompanies expedition objects and a diagram with 48 quotes in snowflake form, each branch a different line of thought. “Jenkinson takes a new angle on the [Antarctic] landscape in her installation…Christchurch Art Gallery director Jenny Harper says these remnants of human endeavour evoke a sense of timelessness and represent the ultimate price paid by Scott and his team”, C. Moore, The Press. In sum, Scott’s scientific specimens are reexamined through artistic and ethical filters, a discussion furthered in my conference paper Ponderable Matter, Hobart, 2010.

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  • Vivaldi, A. Cello Sonatas Nos. 1-6 (with versions by L. Dallapiccola) (JH Tibbles, harpsichord) [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James; Rummel, M

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Haydn. Trios for Flute, Cello and Piano Hob. XV:15-17 (M Rummel, cello) [CD recording]

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, flute (soloist) ; Martin Rummel, cello (soloist) ;Christopher Hinterhuber, piano (soloist) CD recording of Haydn, Flute Trios Hob XV;15-17. Digital distribution started in May 2011, physical release October 2011

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  • Te Parapara Garden

    Bonica, Dante; Puke, Wiremu

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Parapara Garden is the only garden of its type in a major city with traditional structures and food crops that are now extremely rare and outside of a museum setting. Dante played a very important role in almost all facets of the project during the entire duration of project as an adviser and contributor which included: Kokowai advice, preparation and application for all carved structures are believed to be the only structures entirely painted with Kokowai in Aotearoa and outside of a museum setting. The images of carvings attached to this NRO shows kokowai aplication as described from the early accounts. He carved the taumata atua for the tuahu. The patterns carved are from ancient taumatua atua from Waikato. He sourced and gathered obsidian from Taupō for customary usages at Te Parapara including preparing and installing the flaked obsidian eyes for parata-toi moko located at the rear of the pātaka. He prepared all the cordage for the pātaka, whatarangi and ruakūmara. He sourced, gathered and prepared kiekie roots and worked them inot the structural lashings for the pātaka. He sourced, gathered and prepared totara bark for thatching, and employed ancient thatching techiques for the pātaka, kāuta and ruakūmara. He manufactured replica agricultural implements from stone and wood for the māra kūmara He conducted the additional research on traditional lashing techniques to ensure the work's authenticity. He manufactured the feather wig for the tekoteko of the main pātaka. He gave a demonstration of Hika ahi (fire making) as part of the main opening of the Te Parapara Garden.

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  • Sensitive Buildings

    RIEGER, U

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Crown Coach Botanical

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The City of Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency commissioned “Crown Coach Botanical” for use in a planned public artwork and provided US $24,000 for its production. The series of twenty-eight ambrotype plates comprised a survey of the rich variety of plants clinging to the Crown Coach Brownfield, a polluted wasteland in downtown L.A. set for remediation. Following a solo exhibition at Two Rooms Gallery in 2008, John Hurrell wrote “these strange blurred and specked images are of plants …found in the Los Angeles region where she now lives. Looking at them is like going back in time a hundred and fifty years.” (Eyecontact 9/08). A full set of these photographs were acquired by the City of Los Angeles art collection. Several images from this series were included in my contribution to Altogether Elsewhere, a feature exhibition by curator Rob Tufnell at the Zoo Art Fair, 2009 alongside artists including Alighiero Boetti, Jim Lambie, Mungo Thomson, Gülsün Karamustafa, Mike Nelson and Richard Hughes.

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  • LA Botanical

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    LA Botanical is an ongoing project, massive and perhaps unachievable in its full potential scope, to document each plant that grows in Los Angeles for which there is a documented use - be it food, medicine, weapon, abortive, analgesic, fuel, stimulant, building material, deadly toxin or mind altering entheogen. The plants are documented as wet-plate Ambrotypes, an anachronistic photographic form ubiquitous the 1850's-1890s, the period during in which Los Angeles grew from a dusty town of 1400 inhabitants to a major metropolitan center. The project is an attempt to reconcile Campbell's own rural background with her life here in Los Angeles, one of the most sprawling and unsustainable metropolises on earth. LA Botanical operates simultaneously as map, inventory, and survival guide to the city of Los Angeles. It has the potential to reveal who lives here, from where they originate, what they value, how they eat, worship, heal, harm, travel, clothe themselves, seek insight or achieve oblivion. It also serves as a tool or guide - enabling its audience to see Los Angeles, not as a desiccated industrial wasteland into which resources must flow, but as a field of abundant life that might be harvested to satisfy our needs.

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  • Te Taniwha

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Taniwha is an ongoing collaborative project between Joyce Campbell and Historian Richard Niania (of Ngai Kohatu and Ngati Hinehika Hapu and Ngati Kahungunu Iwi), drawing on the mythology, history and ecology of Te Reinga and the Ruakituri Valley west of Wairoa where Campbell grew up. It traces the search for two great, serpentine water species: the Taniwha Hinekörako and the giant longfin eel and pays particular attention to the birth and life of a Puhi named Te Taniwha who was born into the war party of Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki around 1868 as they battled colonial troups in the Ruakituri valley. Joyce Campbell has been working onsite in a field darkroom to produce ambrotypes and daguerreotypes at Te Reinga, home of the Taniwha Hinekörako. Contemporary cameras do not lend themselves to the depiction of mystery. Digital cameras have made photography an increasingly descriptive medium and also one that is open to greater manipulation than ever before. By contrast, the nineteenth century techniques of ambrotype and daguerreotype provide the photographer with extraordinarily detail, depth and richness while also having an innate tendency to produce artifacts from silver and ether that are spontaneous, open to interpretation and often extraordinarily beautiful. Campbell has taken photographs of caves, gullies, pools and cascades but her hope is that in the silver we might catch a glimpse of the Taniwha as well.

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  • TAG - Simon Ingram and James Cousins

    Cousins, James; Ingram, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A two-person exhibition featuring 4 works by each artist. The principle of the exhibition was such that points of formal and conceptual commonality in each artists' painting practice would be unpacked, analyzed and re-configured discursively through the playful and collaborative process of selecting and installing the works. These were not major works, but ones that represented experimental and oblique moments of discovery in each artist's practice and were not necessarily works either artist would ordinarily exhibit. The exhibition received a review on ArtForum online, on the Minus Space website and on a local art review website called eyecontact. See: http://www.gowlangsfordgallery.co.nz/exhibitions/pastexhibitions/2010/iniative1cousinsingram.asp

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  • Coleccion Grafica

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Village: Solo exhibition (multiple venues)

    Hipkins, Gavin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce Danced, Part 1

    Kerr, Sean

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced, Part 1 covers Sean Kerr’s work through the period 2010-2000. It recognises the instability of media art, looking back to recreate previous works, exploiting the juxtaposition of past and present to illustrate potential trajectories between works. Whether delivered live in the mode of performance, completed by the active role of the viewer, upgraded to evade redundant technology, or the simple practicality of reconfiguring an installation for a new site, Kerr’s work refuses to be fixed in time through the process of a conventional retrospective. Taking place simultaneously at the Gus Fisher Gallery and Artspace, this exhibition is the first survey of Kerr’s work. One of New Zealand's leading digital artists, Kerr's interests lie in the emergent area of new media technologies, incorporating internet art, installation and sonic practices, but with a particular focus on the expectations and effects of interactivity. This often includes ill-mannered scenarios and ‘misbehaving’ machines that owe as much to communication theory as slapstick comedy, exploring both social and technological dynamics. Bruce danced coincides with the launch of a new book covering Kerr’s work from the early 1990s to the present day. The 160-page publication On the Nose, published by Clouds, is out in September. This exhibition and publication is supported by a National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries (NICAI) Research Development Fund.

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  • ...a tent, pitched in the wilderness

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    ‘A tent, pitched in the wilderness’, shown at prominent Sydney gallery Stills, features deserts, architecture and artifacts photographed in Egypt and European museums in late 2011. Inspired by Antarctica, this work identifies a visual and experiential correspondence between the deserts of hot and cold regions, yet acknowledges major differences in the impact of civilization: “Jenkinson’s photographs of / deserts [contain] phantom remains of past civilizations and intimations of possible futures”, Sydney Morning Herald. In highlighting the continuing relevance of the past, this work stands in contra-distinction to the current tendency to give primacy to the new and ever-present, e.g. the recent Egyptian uprising is shown as part of an historical continuum of conflict rather than an insolated incident, a point astutely unraveled by S. Rosenblum in the interview she conducted for East Sydney Radio.

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  • Fleet Light

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Fleet Light was my first exhibition at Stills, a leading Australian gallery (established 1991) representing artists working at the forefront of contemporary photo media practice. Significantly this was also my first show of exclusively digital lenticular prints, a process I first worked with in 2007. I consider this exhibition to be a major statement of both medium and concept; of this technically tricky distinctive medium with its elusive, shifting qualities, and its utilization in the the recreation of equally changeable lighting effects (as in auroae and mirages) and the optical nature of vision itself (such as afterimages). This show effectively links my Antarctica research with my ongoing interest in the colour theories of Johnnn von Goethe's, moving from atmospheric effects to optical effects, the latter that were to be further extended in the national touring exhibition Second Silence. This exhibition lead to further exhibitions at Stills and helped to reestablished my artistic reputation in Australia (further to the three major public shows I was invited to participate in between 1987 and 1999)

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  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.’ The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • Living Halls (Solo exhibition curated by Rhana Davenport)

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    LIVING HALLS is a growing collaborative archive. The paintings, drawings, honour boards, documents, database, photos, stories and audio recordings that make up this archive tell us about the war memorial halls of Aotearoa. Following the Second World War, New Zealanders wholeheartedly embraced the idea of constructing utilitarian memorials to honour soldiers killed in action instead of the ‘traditional’ monuments favoured after the First World War. Government subsidies encouraged the widespread building of community centres and halls as ‘living memorials’ for all to share. These were ‘monuments with an inside’1, conceptually complex spaces that were built by communities to symbolise their grief, but also to solve a practical need for a place to gather for everything from dancing to voting.

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  • architecture e + c work of elin+carmen corneil 1958 to 2008

    Milojevic, Paul

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    architecture e+c work of elin + carmen corneil 1958 to 2008 aims to give a sense of the scope, the composition and the particularity of the Corneil practice archive. From five decades of work and thousands of items, this sampling suggests some of the architects' main preoccupations. Originally proposed by the directors of the Canadian Architectural Archive (University of Calgary) in the late 90's when the material was acquired, the exhibition is meant to bring to light an unusual practice. The work presented shows an engagement in many fields: conceptual, goegraphic, programmatic...

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