217 results for Creative work

  • Flotilla Whau, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Patel, N; Waghorn, Kathy; Bush, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Development of one day participatory event / socially engaged art work for the Rosebank Artwalk, curated by Marcus Williams as part of the Auckland Arts Festival. Commissioned as part of the Rosebank Art Walk (Auckland Arts Festival 2013) the Flotilla Whau was intended as a one-day event where a collection of water-craft traversed a marked course on the Whau river in Auckland, new Zealand. Situated as both art work and community development event, the flotilla brought river users together, stimulating connection and ongoing discussion. The intention of the flotilla was to mark out this marginal estuarine space, in some way drawing attention to it, and in so doing re-establishing the river as a visible,material space that can be occupied, a place one can be in and on. The Flotilla was repeated in 2014 as a stand alone event, with the number of participants increasing from 50 to 300. As a result of the success of these two events the Flotilla Whau was offered funding from Auckland Council for 2015, which allowed for the event to grow the performative spatial and visual components. The 2015 Flotilla Whau took place on Sunday February 8 in collaboration with the Voyager, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

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  • 1000 Lovers

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography - Carol Brown Design - Dorita Hannah Sound - Russell Scoones Dramaturgy - Fiona Graham Producer - Maximus Smitheram 1000 LOVERS is a performance that moves from sea to city through Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter. A cast of mythical characters – Tuna (an eel-man), Hine (his lover), a bride, a widow, and an urban tribe lead this journey. 1000 LOVERS draws its title from Auckland's Māori name Tāmaki Makaurau, which translates not only as 'Isthmus of one thousand lovers', but may also be understood as 'Tāmaki-the bride sought by a hundred suitors'. By re-enacting mythical, historical and everyday stories through music, design and dance the performance reveals hidden narratives and forgotten sites within this urban landscape. 1000 LOVERS follows a walkable route over a 50-minute timeframe, starting at Silo Park and ending on the steps of Karanga Plaza. The sound score provides an additional sensory layer to enhance this experience.

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  • His Second Time: Dialogos

    Lines, David; Mason Battley, C; Giles, S; Thomas, S; Psathas, J (2015-10-24)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Eyetrackers

    Minissale, Gregory; Lambert, Anthony

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eyetrackers is a unique fusion of ideas drawn from art and neuroscience. This exhibition is the result of an ongoing conversation between art historian Greg Minissale and cognitive neuroscientist Tony Lambert, in which they have discovered surprising common ground between the visual arts and the visual sciences. In particular, Eyetrackers explores a question that continues to puzzle, fascinate and inspire both artists and scientists alike: How do we see?

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  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ‘THE IMAGE AS NOT’, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ‘poetry of place’. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ‘topography’ (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seanchaí or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ‘reclaimed’ in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ‘cognitive-imaginative mapping’ of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape – ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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  • Bridging the Wind

    Koo, Sun

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Come along to experience the enchanting and contemplative sounds of three traditional Korean instruments; the Daegeum, Gayageum and Geomungo. Featuring repertoire of both traditional and contemporary compositions, 'Bridging the Wind' promises to be an enjoyable demonstration of the sounds of Korea by three visiting Professors Suh Seungmi, Choi Jin and Cho Kyongsun.

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  • No. 3 from Nine Short Pieces for piano, an arrangement of the Douglas Lilburn piano piece

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve; Lilburn, DG (2015-09-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stroma: performers Hamish McKeich: conductor The third of Lilburn's Nine Short Pieces has a whimsical, almost cartoonish feel to it, as well as a Latin swing, it's syncopated, suggestive and insinuating, with nudging little statement-phrases answered by low punctuations. It's quasi-humorous, repetitive, insistent and, ironically, very restrained - vintage Lilburn. I've heightened the qualities I hear in it, and exaggerated them, since to me it's crying out to be released from its rather reserved and sparse setting. It seemed to beg colourful, distinctive instrumentation, a clear texture which is enriched where needed, and I've added characterful percussion and sonic touches such as a flexatone and the vocal ahhs and oohhs to release its jazzy quality. To me, it's in Lilburn's piano oeuvre that he reveals his true self. Composers understand that they are laid bare in pianistic utterance, and this is particularly evident in DGL. If you listen say, to the first of the Three Sea Changes, the material itself is extremely economical, but its emotional impact is immediate. Few works speak to me so eloquently of NZ, as much of DGL's piano music. Despite DGL being rather cool and terse on the surface, the interactions I had with him exposed a warm and wry side. There's an irony in that the first thing he ever said to me was after hearing a student work of mine played in St Andrew on the Terrace in the mid-80s: "Yes, I heard your piece - a bit too intellectual for me". I offer up this arrangement as a non-intellectual birthday gift from a fellow-Scorpio, whose birthday is a week after his.

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  • host for SATB choir

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-06-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer of the original composition Robert Wiremu: conductor I was delighted to be asked to write host for Karen Grylls’ Auckland Chamber Choir. My first choral work written at her request was Chaos of delight III, a vocal soundscape of avian sonorities for women’s voices. host is also abstract, based not on a text, but on the Vowel Clock used to train choral singers. The whole work is based on the note A and its upper partials and as the singers move around the space, various harmonics from the chord are heard. The title refers to the movement of birds in formation, often called a host. Commissioned by Robert Wiremu for Karen Grylls's 30 year anniversary conducting the Auckland Chamber Choir

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  • Opera Scenes

    Camp, Gregory

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Gregory Camp, director The University of Auckland School of Music voice class presents a series of scenes from a variety of operas, directed by Dr Gregory Camp.

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  • 'The selfish gene' exhibited in the National Contemporary Art Award 2014 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Rees, Judge “I remember looking at dog-shit on the pavement and suddenly I realised, there it is – this is what life is like. Strangely enough it tormented me for months… I think of life as meaningless; but we give meaning during our own existence. We create certain attitudes which give it meaning while we exist, though they in themselves are meaningless, really.” – Francis Bacon, interview with David Sylvester, 1975.

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  • 'Triage' exhibited in the Parkin Drawing Prize 2015 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dick Frizzell, Judge

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  • Future Islands: New Zealand Exhibition, Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

    Waghorn, Kathy; Walker, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • that's obvious! that's right! that's true!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The collective et al. has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally to great acclaim. This exhibition continues their exploration of 'superfiction' by combining words, industrial furniture and video projections to create artworks that mirror political structures. The collective represented New Zealand at the 2005 Venice Biennale with its critically acclaimed installation the fundamental practice. Recent works have addressed fundamentalist practices and ideological schemes, and their impact on societies. The artists' approach is to use fiction and appropriation to mirror various political and belief structures. The work for Christchurch Art Gallery will continue this process of exploring aspects of super-fiction as conceptual and visual artworks.

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  • Witnessing Parihaka

    Matthews, Stephen; Sullivan, R (2011)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stephen Matthews - Composer Robert Sullivan - Poet Auckland Readers and Writers Festival 2011

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  • FLOOD in NZPQ15: Āhua o te Rangi, Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space International Exhibition of Countries and Regions

    Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Erceg, L; Brown, Carol

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography by Carol Brown; performance design by Dorita Hannah; sound design by Russell Scoones; sculptural objects by Linda Erceg. Influenced by Maori and Pacific sacred places (marae), the Ahua o Te Rangi installation serves as an interaction, negotiation and display space that operates as an architecture piece, audiovisual media-site, live performance stage and dialogue exchange platform. FLOOD, the live performance, is re-presented within the exhibition through a video installation and sculptural form.

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  • Assemblages

    Mackel, D; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mackel, D., collaborator Over the past three years both artists have worked collaboratively in an installation format under the broad theme of landscapes of the past. For this exhibition, Deirdre Mackel has produced an installation entitled ‘Accidental Gardens 2’. It consists of a child-like garden made from an enclosure of miniature barbed wire fences, and toy gardening tools, including elements of Nuala Gregory’s flower works and small sculptures or ‘shelves’, assembled together allowing for the combination and interplay of ideas and materials derived from two locations. Deirdre references her remembered landscapes of growing up in West Belfast throughout the conflict and Nuala responds with objects representing those commonly found in the earth - old bottles delicately embellished with buttercups and daisies, combining them with lemon wood blocks to reference her current landscape of New Zealand. This assemblage of objects, symbolises the way things are thrown together in chaotic metropolitan space, forming accidental relations among which new possibilities might yet be glimpsed.

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  • International Akaroa Music Festival 2015

    Salzmann, E (2016-04-05)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artistic director, concerts Invited international artists Prof. Alexander Gebert, cello (Hochschule fuer Musik Detmold), Prof. Elisabeth Kufferath, violin (Hochschule fuer Musik, Hannover), Tasana Nagavajara (Dean of strings, Silpakorn University Bangkok) and Caroline Lmonte (University of Melbourne). 48 students attended the masterclasses, with a total of 1360 audience members attending the festival.

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  • FLUTE FEST 2016; Baroque Architecture and Music in Italy, France and Germany; Dr Ross Jenner speaker; Uwe Grodd flute

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Performance; Vivaldi 'Il pastor fido' Sonata for flute and harpsichord; M Marais 'Les Folies D'espagne' for solo flute; W F Bach Sonata in Fa major for two flutes Performance; Vivaldi 'Il pastor fido' Sonata for flute and harpsichord; M Marais 'Les Folies D'espagne' for solo flute; W F Bach Sonata in Fa major for two flutes

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