216 results for Creative work

  • Te Taniwha

    Campbell, Joyce

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Taniwha is an ongoing collaborative project between Joyce Campbell and Historian Richard Niania (of Ngai Kohatu and Ngati Hinehika Hapu and Ngati Kahungunu Iwi), drawing on the mythology, history and ecology of Te Reinga and the Ruakituri Valley west of Wairoa where Campbell grew up. It traces the search for two great, serpentine water species: the Taniwha Hinekörako and the giant longfin eel and pays particular attention to the birth and life of a Puhi named Te Taniwha who was born into the war party of Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki around 1868 as they battled colonial troups in the Ruakituri valley. Joyce Campbell has been working onsite in a field darkroom to produce ambrotypes and daguerreotypes at Te Reinga, home of the Taniwha Hinekörako. Contemporary cameras do not lend themselves to the depiction of mystery. Digital cameras have made photography an increasingly descriptive medium and also one that is open to greater manipulation than ever before. By contrast, the nineteenth century techniques of ambrotype and daguerreotype provide the photographer with extraordinarily detail, depth and richness while also having an innate tendency to produce artifacts from silver and ether that are spontaneous, open to interpretation and often extraordinarily beautiful. Campbell has taken photographs of caves, gullies, pools and cascades but her hope is that in the silver we might catch a glimpse of the Taniwha as well.

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  • Front Load

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • TAG - Simon Ingram and James Cousins

    Cousins, James; Ingram, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A two-person exhibition featuring 4 works by each artist. The principle of the exhibition was such that points of formal and conceptual commonality in each artists' painting practice would be unpacked, analyzed and re-configured discursively through the playful and collaborative process of selecting and installing the works. These were not major works, but ones that represented experimental and oblique moments of discovery in each artist's practice and were not necessarily works either artist would ordinarily exhibit. The exhibition received a review on ArtForum online, on the Minus Space website and on a local art review website called eyecontact. See: http://www.gowlangsfordgallery.co.nz/exhibitions/pastexhibitions/2010/iniative1cousinsingram.asp

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  • Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce Danced, Part 1

    Kerr, Sean

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced, Part 1 covers Sean Kerr’s work through the period 2010-2000. It recognises the instability of media art, looking back to recreate previous works, exploiting the juxtaposition of past and present to illustrate potential trajectories between works. Whether delivered live in the mode of performance, completed by the active role of the viewer, upgraded to evade redundant technology, or the simple practicality of reconfiguring an installation for a new site, Kerr’s work refuses to be fixed in time through the process of a conventional retrospective. Taking place simultaneously at the Gus Fisher Gallery and Artspace, this exhibition is the first survey of Kerr’s work. One of New Zealand's leading digital artists, Kerr's interests lie in the emergent area of new media technologies, incorporating internet art, installation and sonic practices, but with a particular focus on the expectations and effects of interactivity. This often includes ill-mannered scenarios and ‘misbehaving’ machines that owe as much to communication theory as slapstick comedy, exploring both social and technological dynamics. Bruce danced coincides with the launch of a new book covering Kerr’s work from the early 1990s to the present day. The 160-page publication On the Nose, published by Clouds, is out in September. This exhibition and publication is supported by a National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries (NICAI) Research Development Fund.

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  • ...a tent, pitched in the wilderness

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    ‘A tent, pitched in the wilderness’, shown at prominent Sydney gallery Stills, features deserts, architecture and artifacts photographed in Egypt and European museums in late 2011. Inspired by Antarctica, this work identifies a visual and experiential correspondence between the deserts of hot and cold regions, yet acknowledges major differences in the impact of civilization: “Jenkinson’s photographs of / deserts [contain] phantom remains of past civilizations and intimations of possible futures”, Sydney Morning Herald. In highlighting the continuing relevance of the past, this work stands in contra-distinction to the current tendency to give primacy to the new and ever-present, e.g. the recent Egyptian uprising is shown as part of an historical continuum of conflict rather than an insolated incident, a point astutely unraveled by S. Rosenblum in the interview she conducted for East Sydney Radio.

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  • Fleet Light

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Fleet Light was my first exhibition at Stills, a leading Australian gallery (established 1991) representing artists working at the forefront of contemporary photo media practice. Significantly this was also my first show of exclusively digital lenticular prints, a process I first worked with in 2007. I consider this exhibition to be a major statement of both medium and concept; of this technically tricky distinctive medium with its elusive, shifting qualities, and its utilization in the the recreation of equally changeable lighting effects (as in auroae and mirages) and the optical nature of vision itself (such as afterimages). This show effectively links my Antarctica research with my ongoing interest in the colour theories of Johnnn von Goethe's, moving from atmospheric effects to optical effects, the latter that were to be further extended in the national touring exhibition Second Silence. This exhibition lead to further exhibitions at Stills and helped to reestablished my artistic reputation in Australia (further to the three major public shows I was invited to participate in between 1987 and 1999)

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  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.’ The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • Breaking boundaries (the unseen Strength)

    Lee, Pei-Jung

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to explore the unseen strength hidden within Asian women in the result of long term traditional values.

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  • Spirit of the Land (K Grylls, conductor) [CD recording]

    Grylls, Karen

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • NZ Youth Choir: Guest recital (Recital conductor)

    Grylls, Karen

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New works on paper (solo exhibition)

    Cherrie, Derrick

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The six works featured in this exhibition were selected from over 20 works, completed late in 2008 and throughout 2009. This exhibition represents the outcome of the first stage of body of creative work through which I intend to investigate the dialectic gap between brute materiality and constructed meaning. That is, (1) how artists manipulate the ‘dumb’ materials of their medium (paint, wood, stone etc.) to produce meaningful forms; and (2) how the resulting meaning goes beyond (transcends) the materials to become the aesthetic basis of a shared culture. This exhibition was the first of a series of exhibitions through which these themes will be explored. This project, in both its expressive methodologies and theoretical underpinnings draws on the exploration of the dialectic of material and meaning initially explored in 1960’s & 70’s in the work of second generation New York School abstract expressionists and neo-dadaist painters such as Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Similar themes of relevance to this project are beginning to be explored through a poststructuralist semiotic frame of reference by contemporary artists such as Josh Smith, Isa Genzken, & Jutta Koether.

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  • Random Walk in Brussels

    Ingram, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Light, Water, Pigment - an active accord

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Exhibition of 9 paintings for the Second International Conference on Semiconductor Photochemistry. The exhibition was based on common materials used in photochemistry and watercolour painting, water, pigment and light.

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  • Toi Te Papa: Art of the Nation

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sugarloaf is the largest non site specific light box produced in the series of light boxes made between 1998 and 2006 It was commissioned by Te Papa, the national museum and exhibited for the first time in Toi Te Papa- Art of the Nation, in 2007.

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  • Four times painting

    Ingram, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Four Times Painting focused on the work of four contemporary New Zealand artists, who each critically engage with the history and practice of painting. Acknowledging painting as a medium that had come back into critical focus, the exhibition enlarged on this medium’s current situation and considered how painters engaged with its history, purpose, and material practices. Curated by Christina Barton, Four Times Painting featured the work of Simon Ingram, Julian Dashper, Isobel Thom and Shane Cotton, four artists whose works can be approached as complex and multilayered meditations on painting’s relation to time. Simon Ingram’s works critically examine a history of painting’s relation to technology. This exhibition featured his ‘painting assemblages’ that used robotic technology to paint themselves and thus drew attention to the ‘performance’ of painting, and his ‘automata paintings,’ whose complex grid formations are built by using a methodology derived from the self-organising systems of artificial life.

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  • The Light Horizon

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Light Horizon exhibition draws on photographs taken during my two weeks on the Ice as an Antarctic Artist’s Fellow, Dec. 2005. The show was significant for its scale and scope – 40 digital photo collage works, and lenticular prints, from eight different series. It represents the culmination of my most significant research outputs from the ‘Antarctica’ project to date and included works selected from the exhibitions The Dark Continent, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, Jun-July 2007, and The Weight of Water, Mark Hutchins Gallery, Wellington, Sept 2007. This exhibition occupied both the downstairs and upstairs galleries at Two Rooms, one of New Zealand’s leading galleries. [583] Commentary: This research acknowledges Antarctica as a complex site that cannot be summed up in one particular artistic approach. The images I produced represent a major departure from my previous photographic practice and constitute a range of approaches differing considerably from the majority of photography undertaken on the Continent. In my work landscape was the starting point for a series of meditations on Antarctica’s heroic age of exploration, Antarctica as a place of speculation and wonder, a site of scientific study and more recently commercial speculation. Digital montage enabled me to overlay past and present, the scientific and cultural, while the visual trickery of the lenticular process (first used in The Dark Continent, 2007) provided further conceptual shifts, emphasizing the uncertainty and instability of the landscapes in view. Virginia Were in Volatile Imaginings, Art News New Zealand, Winter 2008, wrote: “Megan Jenkinson’s visit to Antarctica has spawned an extraordinary series of photographs, which present a post-romantic view of our engagement with nature’… ‘[her work is] like an extended love poem to a place she found both confounding and inspiring’… ‘Jenkinson’s photographic montages are brilliant evocations of these atmospheric phenomena [auroras and mirages], visual tricks from the imagination of this acclaimed artist’. Reviewed in The NZ Herald and 5 works collected by Te Papa Tongarewa. [1,214] • Part of the Auckland Festival of Photography, 2008, receiving additional public exposure as a result. • Five Works collected by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. • Volatile Imaginings’, Artist’s Profile, Art News, New Zealand, Winter, 2008, pages 72 – 75. • Adam Gifford, ‘Changing View of a Frozen Land,’ review, in the New Zealand Herald, illustrated, 20.5.09 • Sharu Delilkan, ‘Trick of the Light,’ review in The Aucklander, illustrated, 7.5.08 • Gallery Talk on the exhibition, Two Rooms (in connection with the 2008 Auckland Festival of Photography), 11.6.08 • Gallery talk to members of the Paradise Art Group. • The exhibition was advertised in the following: Art News, New Zealand, Winter 2008 (full page colour advertisement); Art Zone April/June 2008 (full page); and the Auckland Readers and Writers Festival ’08 booklet (1/3 page). • “I was horrified by the Brilliance of your work. My jaw dropped open as I tried to comprehend how you achieved it all.” (Email from Greta Anderson, ex student and tutor at Elam).

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  • REVOLVE An interactive performance

    Brown, Carol; Niemetz, A; Gander, P; Medlin, M; Scoones, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Co-conceived by Carol Brown and Anne Niemetz; dancing, choreography, spoken text and performance elements authored by Carol Brown; Anne Niemetz designed the wearable technology, interface system and filmed and edited the video compoent; Russell Scoones developed the recorded soundscape; Philippa Gander contributed expertise as a sleep scientist and co-researcher in the developmental stages of the project dramaturgy; Margie Medlin was responsible for the overall lighting design and related performance elements; additional contributors included Fiona Graham and Alys Longley who contributed to the development of the performance texts. REVOLVE is a real-time interactive performance that sheds light on the ‘stuff’ dreams are made of, the night-stories and bodily states that shape our sleeping hours. As an arts-science collaboration, the research imperative was to translate the data of a sleep scientist into sonic and choreographic content through wearable technologies. The work invites audiences to experience a series of states enfolding voice, sound, light, video and dance, as she metaphorically traces the path of the sleeper’s mind and body from dusk to dawn. Driven by a curiosity about the body, its rhythms and potential for change, the work alludes to the planetary, physiological and personal cycles that round our lives. In doing so, it explores how the non-literalness of scientific phenomena (data from EEG readings of brain waves) can be mapped through interactive performance and made meaningful as a series of performative states for audiences. The performance ecology enfolds wearable electronic sensor technology, video, lighting, text, recorded sound and an interactive sound environment within a choreographic score. Sensing the body, its gestures and its environment through the measurement of light, tilt and acceleration, Carol Brown wears a “sensor suit” that allows her to intuitively control and interact with a malleable sound environment. She can respond to this environment by choosing to expose or hide light-sensitive parts of her body and combining these actions with movements of varied speed. In turn, the sonic feedback influences the emerging choreographic score, inducing constraints and generative cyclic patterns for movement. The dramaturgy is driven by concepts based on the physiological cycles that underlie sleeping and waking, which are in turn shaped by our circadian biological clock that keeps our sleep/wake cycle coordinated with the rotation of the earth. REVOLVE includes scenes that are inspired by states such as light sleep – delving in and out of wakefulness; deep sleep – a state in which the brain’s neuronal activity synchs up to create very slow and large brainwaves; and REM sleep – a state characterised by nervous muscle twitches and rapid eye movements that come from an active, but sleeping brain. At the end of the performance there is a metaphorical breech into waking consciousness as the brain re-engages with the external world through purposeful and directed movement. The sound design is partially composed, and partially interactive. The composed sounds are sourced from EEG brainwaves, recordings of a sleeping child and the voice of tenor Keith Lewis. The interactive sounds are based on the auditory beat, a phenomenon that arises when two pure tones of different, but neighbouring frequencies are played together. In such a situation, a beat frequency emerges, perceived as a periodic pulsing of the sound. These beats – waves of sound - are powerful to listen to, physically moving, subsonic but clearly perceivable.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: a project for The Lab at "If you were to live here . . " the 5th Auckland Triennial

    Waghorn, Kathy; Cruz, T; Patel, N; Mecredy, Esther

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    research and curation International curator of the 5th Auckland Triennial Hou Hanru described The Lab as the Triennial’s “intellectual core ( . . .) functioning like a machine of knowledge (. . . ) a kind of brain for the whole project”. The Lab was a joint project of the architecture and spatial design faculties of The University of Auckland, AUT, and UNITEC. Working under the Triennial title “If You Were To Live Here . . . ” the Lab’s role was to act as a catalyst for the critical examination of urban life in Auckland and New Zealand. The Lab physically took form in the Chartwell Gallery at Auckland Art Gallery. The Muddy Urbanism Lab was developed by Kathy Waghorn (University of Auckland) with Triennial and Auckland University guest Teddy Cruz, Professor in Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at University of California, San Diego, and co-founder of the Center for Urban Ecologies. Working with post-graduate architecture students from the University the research focussed on the Whau River, a tidal waterway bisecting the inner west of Auckland, creating a portage that connects the Waitemat? and Manukau harbours. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production along the coastlines of T?maki Makaurau. In the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route and as a source of clay. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism engaged in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment that may be applied across Auckland. The research was presented in large scale prints, models and projections and the Lab became the venue for an associated public programme.

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  • 1000 Lovers

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography - Carol Brown Design - Dorita Hannah Sound - Russell Scoones Dramaturgy - Fiona Graham Producer - Maximus Smitheram 1000 LOVERS is a performance that moves from sea to city through Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter. A cast of mythical characters – Tuna (an eel-man), Hine (his lover), a bride, a widow, and an urban tribe lead this journey. 1000 LOVERS draws its title from Auckland's Māori name Tāmaki Makaurau, which translates not only as 'Isthmus of one thousand lovers', but may also be understood as 'Tāmaki-the bride sought by a hundred suitors'. By re-enacting mythical, historical and everyday stories through music, design and dance the performance reveals hidden narratives and forgotten sites within this urban landscape. 1000 LOVERS follows a walkable route over a 50-minute timeframe, starting at Silo Park and ending on the steps of Karanga Plaza. The sound score provides an additional sensory layer to enhance this experience.

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  • Talking my way through culture (curated solo exhibition and exhibition catalogue)

    Smith, Jill

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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