58 results for Journal article, 1960

  • The alleged absence of ubiquinone from elasmobranchs

    Daniel, Roy M.; Redfearn, E.R. (1966)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    It has recently been suggested (Diplock & Haslewood, 1964) that certain lower vertebrates such as elasmobranchs and crocodylians are lacking in ubiquinone. Also, in a study of the lesser-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus caniculus) (Class Elasmobranchii, Order Selachii) Diplock & Haslewood (1965) were unable to demonstrate the biosynthesisof ubiquinone. In view of the fact that in all other vertebrate species so far examined the presence of ubiquinone is well authenticated (Crane, 1965), including in such a closely related animal as the shark (Nazir & Magar, 1964), these results seemed somewhat surprising. However, in view of these findings it seemed that a study of the respiratory enzyme systems of these organisms might be worth while. As a preliminary to this work an investigation on the alleged absence of ubiquinone from elasmobranch tissues was carried out.

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  • Book reviews and Book notices

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book reviews and Book notice from Volume 1, Number 1, 1967 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • Economic geology of the Waikato

    Kear, David (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Waikato contributes between 20 and 25 per cent of New Zealand's mineral production. Aggregate from Mesozoic rocks ranges from good (greywacke) to poor (argillite), with detailed differences being related to the position of the deposit within the New Zealand Geosyncline. Tertiary sediments show rapid facies changes that are reflected in the variability of important coal and limestone deposits. Petroleum and natural gas prospects are marginal at best. Upper Cenozoic deposits include sand, ironsand, pumice, perlite, aggregate, and building stone. Ground water is of vital importance, and is warm or hot in some areas. Good clays are available.

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  • Rational descriptive classification of duricrusts

    Dury, G.H. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The term duricrust appears to be extending itself to include calcareous, gypseous, and saline crusts, in addition to crusts composed dominantly of silica and/or of sesquioxides of iron and aluminium, with or without significant contents of dioxides of manganese or titanium. This latter group can be distinguished as duricrusts proper. Its nomenclature is highly confused, and its classification, in writings in the English language, defective. The relevant problems can be resolved, at least in considerable part, by the introduction, adaptation, and extension of modern terms current in tropical pedology, to give a descriptive classification free of genetic implications. When content of SiO₂, Al₂O₃, and Fe₂O₃ is used as a primary basis for the classification of duricrusts proper, plots on a ternary diagram justify the recognition of seven named types in the fersiallitic range.

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  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents from Volume 3, Number 1, 1969 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • Volcanic ash beds in the Waikato district

    Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This report lies somewhere between the "pathfinder" variety and the completed account for the reason that the results of detailed mapping and identification are still being prepared for publication. For the younger beds less than 36,000 years we now know both the source and the distribution, but for the older ashes commonly referred to as the Hamilton ash, sources are unknown and a knowledge of distribution restricted to the Waikato district. The principal source is the Okataina volcanic centre with Taupo as a subsidiary (Healy, 1964; Thompson, 1964 :44), and on this information, current mapping into the Waikato district proceeds from the east. Under the circumstances of partly completed work it seems prudent to discuss relevant ash beds already known (Vucetich and Pullar, 1963:65-6; 1964:45-6) to introduce briefly current work by the same authors and by W. T. Ward, and then to relate all of this to previous work portrayed in a soil-forming ash shower map by Taylor (1953).

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  • Shore platforms and mass-movement: A reply

    McLean, R.F.; Davidson, C.F. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Implicit in Mr Wright's note on shore platforms and mass-movement is a criticism of our findings on the role of mass-movement in shore platform development along the Gisborne coastline, New Zealand (McLean and Davidson, 1968). The lack of explicit criticism makes any reply difficult; we are not rebuked on our own evidence, nor is any fresh evidence presented from the same area to make it necessary for us to change or modify our original views.

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  • Annotated bibliography of central North Island volcanic ash stratigraphy

    Tonkin, Philip J.; Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Prior to 1929 many observations had been published giving brief accounts of the volcanic ash deposits in various parts of the North Island but no detailed investigations were undertaken. With the incidence of Bush Sickness in the Central North Island mapping of the "ash soils" was undertaken as part of the investigations into the cause of this disease. The work done at this time was the beginning of our present understanding of ash stratigraphy. In this bibliography only papers relevant to the Central North Island ash-showers have been mentioned.

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  • Erosion by high intensity rainfalls in the lower Waikato

    Selby, Michael J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A high intensity rainstorm with rainfalls exceeding 10 inches in 24 hours on the Hunua Range is described, and some of its geomorphological and economic consequences discussed.

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  • Shore platforms and mass movement: a note

    Wright, L.W. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Shore platforms and mass movement phenomena are important elements in the coastal scenery of the British Isles. Both features are particularly well developed along the English Channel coast. Where mass movement is of major importance it tends to inhibit the exposure of shore platforms. Under certain conditions it may temporarily protect the platform from further erosion. The factors which encourage the formation of shore platform and mass movement differ. Mass movement appears to be a secondary process, and does not seem to participate directly in either the primary formation of the shore platform or in its subsequent evolution.

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  • A simplified levelling instrument: the A-frame

    Riley, S.J. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A levelling instrument has been developed which permits work in a high degree of detail without field assistance.

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  • Tidal hydrology in Pegasus Bay

    Blake, G.J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Changes in the geomorphology of the coastal plain river mouths of Pegasus Bay over the last 100 years are considered. Comment is also made on estuarine sediment and flow, the difficulty of measuring these two quantities and the need to treat the estuarine channel of a river as an important part of the catchment.

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  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents of Volume 1, Number 1, 1967 Earth Science Journal.

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  • The climatic character of the Auckland rural area

    Sparrow, Christopher J. (1968)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The characteristics of the climate of the rural area surrounding the Auckland urban area are discussed. Data used, is predominantly from published reports of the New Zealand Meteorological Service giving annual summaries of observations made at the various climatological, synoptic and rainfall recording stations. The mean characteristics of the area's climatic elements are considered together with their extremes. It is concluded that warm temperatures throughout the year, high humidity, variations in amount and. intensity of rainfall, prevailing westerly and infrequent easterly winds and high sunshine hours characterise the climate of this part of northern New Zealand.

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  • Skeleton Islands of New Zealand and elsewhere

    Cotton, C.A. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Skeleton Islands are a variety of the class of islands resulting from subsidence of dissected land, subcategory 4a of a classification of islands here offered. Such islands are characterised by development of a sprawling outline with a narrow axial ridge from which slender lateral spurs, or ribs, extend more or less at right angles. Extreme skeletonisation is associated with development before a final drowning, or redrowning, of amphitheatre heads in valleys already heading in the main divide. This may be a climatically induced change of the valley form related, in the case of the New Zealand example, Arapawa Island, to cryergic (periglacial) activity in the Pleistocene glacial ages. Kakeroma Island (Ryukyu Group), an example of a skeleton island described by W. M. Davis, has quite possibly a history different from that of Arapawa Island as regards both the development of the relief of the subsiding lands and. being in a low latitude, the possibly climatic process responsible for shaping its now submerged valley heads and thus emaciating the ribs of the island.

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  • New Zealand microcosm of subtropical soils

    Guerassimov, I.P. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Some examples of zonal soils in New Zealand are described by a visiting Soviet soil scientist. Analyses made in Moscow of samples collected during the visit are given and compared with results obtained by New Zealand Soil Bureau. The soi1s are correlated with some soils in Transcaucasia and alternative methods of classification are proposed.

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  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents from Volume 3, Number 2, 1969 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • Book reviews and Book notices

    Waikato Geological Society (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book reviews and Book notice from Volume 3, Number 1, 1969 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • A review of urban climatology

    McBoyle, G.R. (1968)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The review attempts to elucidate the history of interest and the developing research work done in the field of urban climatology, with special emphasis on temperature. References are made to the works of certain researchers whose publications have not yet been translated into the English language. The reference list is by no means complete but contains most of the important works in this field.

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  • Aggregation characteristics and maturity of Peak District soils

    Bryan, Rorke B. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Soil aggregation and aggregate stability are fundamental factors in determination of soil erodibility. The aggregation characteristics of soils in a region of high erosion potential are measured, and controlling factors examined. A relationship between increasing soil maturity and decreasing aggregate stability is described, and its significance in relation to Penck’s Aufbereitung concept is discussed.

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