603 results for Journal article, Massey Research Online

  • 11 views of Auckland: Soft-boiled in Ponsonby: The topographies of murder in the crime fiction of Charlotte Grimshaw and Alix Bosco

    Lawn, J (2010)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    11 Views of Auckland stresses a multidisciplinary approach to this most multicultural of New Zealand cities. The serendipitious - complementary rather than contradictory - way the various essays have grouped themselves according to themes during the editing process accents another virtue we've come to value highly during all our years of working together on this clean green suburban campus: collegiality

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  • Losses Loom Longer than Gains: Modeling the Impact of Service Crises on Customer Satisfaction over Time

    Gijsenberg, MJ; van Heerde, HJ; Verhoef, PC (2015-10-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

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  • Outbreak of teat lesions in a herd in Northland.

    Petrovski, Kiro (2005)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom

    Engelbrecht, Hans-Juergen (2006-12-17)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • On the Implementation of Efficient Channel Filters for Wideband Receivers by Optimizing Common Subexpression Elimination Methods

    Vinod, A. P.; Lai, Edmund M-K. (2005-02-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • Magnetic characteristics of the Ság-hegy volcanic complex, little Hungarian Plain

    Dvorazik, Nina; Auer, Andreas; Martin, Ulrike; Nemeth, Karoly; de Wall, Helga; Rolf, Christoph (2006-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    The Ság-hegy volcanic complex is located in the little Hungarian Plain Volcanic Field (LHPVF). An 39Ar/ 40Ar geochronolgy gave an isochron age of 5,42 ±0,06 My for the Ság- hegy (Wijbrans et al. 2004). Evolution of the volcano included two clearly distinct events. At first ascending magma entered meteoric water in a fluvio-lacustrine environment. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) of water (water saturated sediment) and magma led to the formation of a phreatomagmatic tuff ring. After water supply was used up the interior of the tephra ring was filled by a lava lake. Locally the tuff ring wall collapsed and subsequently lava was able to flow out of the tuff ring. Due to intensive quarrying most of the effusive rocks have been removed, giving excellent insight to emplacement processes of feeder dykes, sills and lava lake remnant (Martin and Németh, 2004). Pyroclastic rocks include massive and bedded units of lapilli stone, lapilli tuff/ tuff as well as pyroclastic breccias. Varying proportions of accidental lithic clasts indicate excavation of basement rocks during the erruption. Juvenile clasts comprise mainly of angular, blocky sideromelane glass shards with nearly equent shapes and a minor proportion of tachylite. A high amount of water within the systeme is evidenced by soft sediment deformation and accretionary lapilli in the pyroclastic bedsets. Dune and antidune bedding, chute and pool structures grading and sorting features suggest that the tuff ring was gradually built up by base surge and intercalated fallout deposits. Subsequent to the phreatomagmatic stage the inner crater has been filled with a lava lake which morphology was determined by the tephra deposits. At contacts to the pyroclastics a chilled margin of several cm thickness is developed which shows platty (onion shaped) jointing. A high number of dykes and sills were injected into adjacent bedsets. These shallow intrusive bodys can be found throughout the whole complex truncating and dissecting the pyroclastic units. In cases where pyroclastic units comprised a high amount of water this included even mingling with the wet tephra, leading to the formation of peperites. The uppermost units were represented by thick lava flows, which covered all underlaying units. These rocks were quarryed out already a century ago except a large strombolian spatter cone which is now exposed at the uppermost level of the quarry as a big sliced remnant including its large multiple feeder dyke. This setting offers a perfect opportunity to study the relationship between dyke and sill enplacement with transitions from vertical to bedding-parallel geometries. Dimensions of the volcanic bodies range from cm thickness of small apophyses from the lava lake into the pyroclastic rocks up to dykes and sills of several m. We performed a detailed study on a section of pyroclastic rocks truncated by dykes and sills and have evaluated the magnetic characteristics. Preliminary results show that magnetic susceptibility of all the pyroclastic units is in the range of ferrimagnetic susceptibility and varies between 2 to 20 x 10-3 SI. (Fig.1). Magnetic fabric anisotropy is generally low (< 5 %) and in the field of oblate fabric geometries, in bedded tuffs a significantly higher (5 to 10 %) but also oblate anisotropy is realized. Magnetic lineations indicate a consistent NE (020) directed material transport for the whole succession. Remanence intensities are quite high with values of 1 to 15 A/m In the pyroclastic units a stable magnetic remanence characterized by a single vector component has been measured, MDF values are in the range of 30 to 160 mT. The field vector has exclusively reversed polarity and steep inclination, which is in agreement with the paleofield direction and therefore is regarded as natural remanent magnetization aquired during deposition of the pyroclastic successions. In the dykes and sills, however, remanence direction scatter significantly and display geometries ranging from steep to flat orientations and show also strong variations in the declination. Coercitivity of magnetic carriers is significanty lower as indicated by the lower MDF values which are in the range of 8 to 30 mT in the dykes and 15 to 30 mT in sills. Beside a minor contribution of a viscose component the remanence vector in the dykes and sills is characterized by a stable single component. However, further investigations are needed to fully understand and interpret the results

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  • Identity Issues and Challenges Faced by Russian Immigrants in New Zealand

    Maydell, E; Wilson, MS (2009)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Among the processes cosmopolitan societies undergo at the present moment, is the unprecedented increase in mass migration across cultures. What challenges are faced by both immigrants, who have to settle in novel socio-cultural environments, and by the host populations accepting them? The current qualitative study investigates the nature of identity construction among Russian-speaking immigrants in New Zealand, applying thematic analysis for the interpretation of the data collected via 23 in-depth interviews. Among the most common themes articulated by the participants was the feeling of identity loss. A taken-for-granted sense of identity, brought by the participants from their culture of origin, was not validated by their new society of residence, mostly due to the lack of appropriate cultural resources. The participants were faced with a challenge of re-constructing their old identity, or constructing a new one, utilising the available resources in the community around them. At the same time, there was a sub-group for whom this challenge brought the realisation that the nature of their identity is cosmopolitan, rather than located within any particular culture or geographical space

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  • Pacific Accounting Review – The First Twenty-Five Years

    Bradbury, Michael E; Hooks, Jill (2013)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    ‘This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here http://mro.massey.ac.nz. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.' http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0114-0582&volume=25&issue=3&articleid=17100708 http:dx.doi.org/10.1108/PAR-08-2013-0079

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  • Using directed acyclic graphs to consider adjustment for socioeconomic status in occupational cancer studies

    Richiardi, L.; Barone-Adesi, F.; Merletti, F.; Pearce, N. (2008-07)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    There is an ongoing debate on whether analyses of occupational studies should be adjusted for socioeconomic status (SES). In this paper directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) were used to evaluate common scenarios in occupational cancer studies with the aim of clarifying this issue. It was assumed that the occupational exposure of interest is associated with SES and different scenarios were evaluated in which ( a) SES is not a cause of the cancer under study, (b) SES is not a cause of the cancer under study, but is associated with other occupational factors that are causes of the cancer, (c) SES causes the cancer under study and is associated with other causal occupational factors. These examples illustrate that a unique answer to the issue of adjustment for SES in occupational cancer studies is not possible, as in some circumstances the adjustment introduces bias, in some it is appropriate and in others both the adjusted and the crude estimates are biased. These examples also illustrate the benefits of using DAGs in discussions of whether or not to adjust for SES and other potential confounders.

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  • On the road to diploidization? Homoeolog loss in independently formed populations of the allopolyploid Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Joshi, Prashant; Soltis, Kerry A.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E. (2009-06-27)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Background: Polyploidy (whole-genome duplication) is an important speciation mechanism, particularly in plants. Gene loss, silencing, and the formation of novel gene complexes are some of the consequences that the new polyploid genome may experience. Despite the recurrent nature of polyploidy, little is known about the genomic outcome of independent polyploidization events. Here, we analyze the fate of genes duplicated by polyploidy (homoeologs) in multiple individuals from ten natural populations of Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae), all of which formed independently from T. dubius and T. pratensis less than 80 years ago. Results: Of the 13 loci analyzed in 84 T. miscellus individuals, 11 showed loss of at least one parental homoeolog in the young allopolyploids. Two loci were retained in duplicate for all polyploid individuals included in this study. Nearly half (48%) of the individuals examined lost a homoeolog of at least one locus, with several individuals showing loss at more than one locus. Patterns of loss were stochastic among individuals from the independently formed populations, except that the T. dubius copy was lost twice as often as T. pratensis. Conclusion: This study represents the most extensive survey of the fate of genes duplicated by allopolyploidy in individuals from natural populations. Our results indicate that the road to genome downsizing and ultimate genetic diploidization may occur quickly through homoeolog loss, but with some genes consistently maintained as duplicates. Other genes consistently show evidence of homoeolog loss, suggesting repetitive aspects to polyploid genome evolution.

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  • Learning opportunities and learning behaviours of small business starters: Relations with goal achievement, skill development and satisfaction

    Van Gelderen, Marco; Van der Sluis, Lidewey; Jansen, Paul (2005)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Learning is a vital issue for small business starters, contributing to short term and long term business performance, as well as to personal development. This study investigates when and how small business starters learn. It specifies the situations that offer learning opportunities, as well as the learning behaviours that small business starters can employ in order to learn from these opportunities. In a cross-sectional, quantitative study of recently started small business founders, learning opportunities and learning behaviours are related to three outcome measures: a performance outcome (goal achievement), a personal growth outcome (skill development), and an affective evaluation outcome (satisfaction). The results show the importance of learning opportunities and learning behaviours in influencing these outcome variables, albeit not always in the directions we hypothesized.

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  • The role of the milking machine in the aetiology and epidemiology of bovine mastitis.

    Petrovski, Kiro (2005)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland that causes major economic losses In developed dairy countries. A great deal of research has been directed toward the identification of machine factors related to mastitis. The milking machine has little effect on the new mastitis infection rate if it is installed, operated and functions according to internationally recognised standards. Its role in causing mastitis is often overestimated. It has proven difficult to produce mastitis experimentally soley by altering machine functions within accepted parameters. Although not a direct prerequisite for mastitis, the milking machine has significant effects upon the aetiology and epidemiology of mastitis. These effects may operate directly by increasing the new intramammary infection rate, or indirectly by increasing the risk of exposure of the mammary gland to mastitis-causing organisms, and reducing disease resistance in the cow.

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  • A cell growth model revisited

    Derfel, G; Van Brunt, B; Wake, Graeme C. (2012)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    In this paper a stochastic model for the simultaneous growth and division of a cell-population cohort structured by size is formulated. This probabilistic approach gives straightforward proof of the existence of the steady-size distribution and a simple derivation of the functional-differential equation for it. The latter one is the celebrated pantograph equation (of advanced type). This firmly establishes the existence of the steady-size distribution and gives a form for it in terms of a sequence of probability distribution functions. Also it shows that the pantograph equation is a key equation for other situations where there is a distinct stochastic framework.

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  • Understanding the Relationship between Activity and Neighbourhoods (URBAN) Study: research design and methodology

    Badland, Hannah M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Witten, Karen; Schluter, Philip J.; Mavoa, Suzanne; Kearns, Robin A.; Hinckson, Erica A.; Oliver, Melody; Kaiwai, Hector; Jensen, Victoria G.; Ergler, Christina; McGrath, Leslie; McPhee, Julia (2009-07)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Background: Built environment attributes are recognized as being important contributors to physical activity (PA) engagement and body size in adults and children. However, much of the existing research in this emergent public health field is hindered by methodological limitations, including: population and site homogeneity, reliance on self-report measures, aggregated measures of PA, and inadequate statistical modeling. As an integral component of multi-country collaborative research, the Understanding the Relationship between Activity and Neighbourhoods (URBAN) Study seeks to overcome these limitations by determining the strengths of association between detailed measures of the neighborhood built environment with PA levels across multiple domains and body size measures in adults and children. This article outlines the research protocol developed for the URBAN Study. Methods and design: The URBAN Study is a multi-centered, stratified, cross-sectional research design, collecting data across four New Zealand cities. Within each city, 12 neighborhoods were identified and selected for investigation based on higher or lower walkability and Maori demographic attributes. Neighborhoods were selected to ensure equal representation of these characteristics. Within each selected neighborhood, 42 households are being randomly selected and an adult and child ( where possible) recruited into the study. Data collection includes: objective and self-reported PA engagement, neighborhood perceptions, demographics, and body size measures. The study was designed to recruit approximately 2,000 adults and 250 children into the project. Other aspects of the study include photovoice, which is a qualitative assessment of built environment features associated with PA engagement, an audit of the neighborhood streetscape environment, and an individualized neighborhood walkability profile centered on each participant's residential address. Multilevel modeling will be used to examine the individual-level and neighborhood-level relationships with PA engagement and body size. Discussion: The URBAN Study is applying a novel scientifically robust research design to provide urgently needed epidemiological information regarding the associations between the built environment and health outcomes. The findings will contribute to a larger, international initiative in which similar neighborhood selection and PA measurement procedures are utilized across eight countries. Accordingly, this study directly addresses the international priority issues of increasing PA engagement and decreasing obesity levels.

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  • Survival disparities in Indigenous and non-Indigenous New Zealanders with colon cancer: the role of patient comorbidity, treatment and health service factors

    Hill, Sarah; Sarfati, Diana; Blakely, Tony; Robson, Bridget; Purdie, Gordon; Chen, Jarvis; Dennett, Elizabeth; Cormack, Donna; Cunningham, Ruth; Dew, Kevin; McCreanor, Tim; Kawachi, Ichiro (2010-02)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Background Ethnic disparities in cancer survival have been documented in many populations and cancer types. The causes of these inequalities are not well understood but may include disease and patient characteristics, treatment differences and health service factors. Survival was compared in a cohort of Maori ( Indigenous) and non-Maori New Zealanders with colon cancer, and the contribution of demographics, disease characteristics, patient comorbidity, treatment and healthcare factors to survival disparities was assessed. Methods Maori patients diagnosed as having colon cancer between 1996 and 2003 were identified from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and compared with a randomly selected sample of non-Maori patients. Clinical and outcome data were obtained from medical records, pathology reports and the national mortality database. Cancer-specific survival was examined using Kaplane-Meier survival curves and Cox hazards modelling with multivariable adjustment. Results 301 Maori and 328 non-Maori patients with colon cancer were compared. Maori had a significantly poorer cancer survival than non-Maori ( hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.71) that was not explained by demographic or disease characteristics. The most important factors contributing to poorer survival in Maori were patient comorbidity and markers of healthcare access, each of which accounted for around a third of the survival disparity. The final model accounted for almost all the survival disparity between Maori and non-Maori patients ( HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.47). Conclusion Higher patient comorbidity and poorer access and quality of cancer care are both important explanations for worse survival in Maori compared with non-Maori New Zealanders with colon cancer.

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  • All the world wide web's a stage: The performance of identity in online social networks

    Pearson, E (2009-03-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    This paper discusses how ideas of performance can be used to conceptualize the play of identity formation on social networking sites (SNS). Linking Goffman's theories of social performance with Granovetter's notion of the social tie, this paper will argue that identities on SNS are deliberately constructed performances that straddle the frontstage and the backstage, the public and the private, and in doing so both support and rely upon webs of social connections which engage with fluid or playful identity constructions.

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  • Responses to supplementation by dairy cows given low pasture allowances in different seasons 2. Milk production

    Penno, J. W.; Macdonald, K. A.; Holmes, Colin W.; Davis, S. R.; Wilson, G. F.; Brookes, Ian M.; Thom, E. R. (2006)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Two factorial experiments were designed to determine the effects of stage of lactation, and season of the year, on cow responses to supplementary feeding. These experiments were conducted over consecutive years with 128 high genetic merit multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows in early, mid and late lactation in spring, summer, autumn and winter. At each stage of lactation, and in each season of the year, cows were offered a restricted pasture allowance (25 to 35 kg dry matter (DM) per cow per day), either unsupplemented (control) or with supplement at 50 MJ metabolizable energy (ME) per cow per day in experiment 1 and 80 MJ ME per cow per day in experiment 2. The two supplements given in both years were rolled maize grain (MG) and a mixture of foods formulated to nutritionally balance the diet (BR). In experiment 2, another treatment, of a generous pasture allowance (60 to 75 kg DM per cow per day) (AP), was imposed on an additional group of early lactation cows during each season. Direct milk solids (MS) (milk fat plus milk protein) responses in experiment 1 to MG were 169, 279, 195 and 251 g MS per cow per day in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively, while those to BR were 107, 250, 192, 289 g MS per cow per day. In experiment 2, however, milk solids responses to both supplements during spring were slightly below the control treatment, with values similar to those in experiment 1 in summer and autumn for cows on the BR but not the MG supplement. Milk solids responses to supplementary foods were largest during seasons of the year when the quantity and quality of pasture on offer resulted in the lowest milk solids yield from unsupplemented cows. When carry-over effects of feeding MG and BR on milk solids production were detected, they were only about half the magnitude of the direct effects. Serum urea concentrations were higher in control cows than those offered MG with a similar effect for BR in all but summer in experiment 1, while serum glucose concentrations were highest in winter and lowest in summer. The most important factor influencing milk solids responses was the relative food deficit (RFD) represented by the decline in milk solids yield of the respective control groups after,changing from a generous pasture allowance to restricted allowance when the feeding treatments were imposed. Total milk solids responses (direct and carry-over) to supplements were greatest when severe food restrictions, relative to the cows' current food demand, resulted in large reductions in milk solids yield of the control groups. The RFD was the best predictor of milk solids response to supplementary foods. Therefore, it is likely that cows are most responsive to supplementary foods during or immediately after the imposition of a severe food restriction.

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  • Studies of the microstructure of polymer-modified bitumen emulsions using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Haverkamp, Richard G. (2001-05-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Polymer-modified bitumen emulsions present a safer and more environmentally friendly binder for enhancing the properties of roads. Cationic bitumen emulsion binders containing polymer latex were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The latex was incorporated into the bitumen emulsion by using four different addition methods and all emulsions were processed with a conventional colloid mill. The emulsion binder films were studied after evaporation of the emulsion aqueous phase. We show how the microstructure and distribution of the polymer varies within the bitumen binder depending on latex addition method, and that the microstructure of the binder remains intact when exposed to elevated temperature. It was found that a distinctly fine dispersion of polymer results when the polymer is blended into the bitumen before the emulsifying process (a monophase emulsion). In contrast, bi-phase emulsion binders produced by either post-adding the latex to the bitumen emulsion, or by adding the latex into the emulsifier solution phase before processing, or by comilling the latex with the bitumen, water and emulsifier all resulted in a network formation of bitumen particles surrounded by a continuous polymer film. The use of emulsified binders appears to result in a more evenly distributed polymer network compared to the use of hot polymer-modified binders, and they therefore have greater potential for consistent binder cohesion strength, stone retention and therefore improved pavement performance.

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  • A mobile learning overview by timeline and mind map

    Parsons, D (2014-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Copyright © 2014, IGI Global.Mobile learning has been a research topic for some 20 years. Over that time it has encompassed a wide range of concepts, theories, designs, experiments and evaluations. With increasing interest in mobile learning from researchers and practitioners, an accessible overview of this area of research that encapsulates its many facets and features can provide a useful snapshot of the field to interested parties. This article provides a summary of the field of mobile learning, applying the main analysis categories of research, technology, content, learning and learner. The author presents these categories and subcategories in the form of a mind map, which outlines the details of the major themes in mobile learning. In addition, the author contextualises the key developments in mobile learning in a timeline. The intent of this article is that it may serve as an introduction to the research field of mobile learning, enabling researchers to quickly familiarise themselves with the type of work that has been done in the past, and the potential areas of investigation that might prove fruitful in the future.

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  • High level sill and dyke intrusions initiated from rapidly buried mafic lava flows in scoria cones of Tongoa, Vanuatu (New Hebrides), South Pacific

    Nemeth, Karoly; White, James D. L. (2006-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Scoria cones are generally considered to grow rapidly in days to weeks or months. During their growth lava flows may be fed onto the cone surface from lava-lake breaches, or form by coalescence of spatter; such flows are preserved interbedded with scoria lapilli and ash beds. On Tongoa, an island of the Vanuatu volcanic arc in the South Pacific, a series of scoria cones developed during the Holocene, forming a widespread monogenetic volcanic field. Half sections of scoria cones along the coast expose complex interior architecture cone architectures. On the western side of Tongoa Island a scoria cone remnant with steeply crater-ward dipping beds of scoria ash and lapilli contains various dm-to-m thick lava flows, which are connected by irregular dikes cutting obliquely across the beds of the cone. The lava flows are coherent igneous bodies with well-developed flow top and basal breccias. The lavas interbedded with the cone-forming layers are part of a larger (up to 7 m thick) body that is connected to dykes and sills of irregular geometries that intrude the cone's pyroclastic layers. This 3D relationship suggests that the lava flows were buried quickly under the accumulating scoriaceous deposits. This allowed subsequent escape of magma from the fluid interiors of flows, with the magma then squeezed upward or laterally into the accumulating pyroclastic pile. Movement of the pile above the partly mobile lava, and potential destabilisation during intrusion into the pile of lava squeezed from the flows, may signal the onset of localised cone failures, and could be implicated in development of major cone breaches (e.g. Paricutin).

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