564 results for Journal article, Unitec Research Bank

  • Leadership learning: a development initiative for experienced New Zealand principals

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2005)

    Journal article
    Unitec

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  • Cartographies of friendship: mapping missionary women’s educational networks in Aotearoa/New Zealand 1823-1840

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Describes a textual map of ways in which two Church Missionary Society (CMS) women, Marianne Coldham Williams and Jane Nelson Williams, established networks predominantly with their evangelical ‘sisters’ in England that simultaneously supported, justified and reinforced their work as missionary educators in Aotearoa/New Zealand in the period 1823-1840. This is a postprint of an article published in History of Education © 2003 [copyright Taylor & Francis]; History of Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/ Access to article via URL : http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0046-760X&volume=32&issue=5&spage=513

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  • Interrogating Orthodox Voices: Gender, Ethnicity and Educational Leadership

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Research in educational leadership and management, while comprehensive in its scope and direction, has considerable imbalance. This article argues that atlthough there has been changes that look at women's leadership, little has been done to address practice or to account for ethnicity and diversity, and there is an implicit assumption that functions and features can be transported across homogenous educational systems. This is an electronic version of an article published in School Leadership and Management which is a available online at Informaworld (http://www.informaworld.com/) with the open URL directly to the published article: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1363-2434&issue=4&spage=431&volume=23

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  • Walking between Two Worlds: Indigenous Women and Educational Leadership

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2006)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article reports on a three-year research project conducted in New Zealand, Australia and Canada for/with Indigenous women. Evidence points to the triple bind Indigenous women face due to exigencies of race and gender and the two worlds they occupy; the Indigenous and the non-Indigenous. Full text not yet available -- currently embargoed. Published copy available from Sage at www.sagepub.co.uk/

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  • The Creation of National Programmes of School Leadership Development in England and New Zealand: A Comparative Study

    Brundrett, Mark; Fitzgerald, Tanya; Sommefeldt, Daniela (2006)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article reports on developments in new headteacher/principal training in England and New Zealand and argues that there are policy similarities between the two countries. The authors suggest that the creation and implementation of comparable school leadership training programmes has formed part of an increasing governmental interest in the importance of leadership development in the two countries that is welcome. There are inherent tensions, dilemmas and dangers in these developments since such centralised initiatives can create an ‘orthodoxy’ of leadership development practices since both governments have created the expectation that those who undertake leadership training for headship or principalship will comply with mandated requirements in order to conform to centrally defined norms. We suggest that fundamental questions concerning the nature of leadership and the knowledge base of professional leadership, leadership training and professional development remain about that should be posited in order to better inform the practice of leadership preparation in both locations.

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  • Archives of memory and memories of archive: CMS women's letters and diaries 1823-1835

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2005)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The focus is the letters and diaries penned by Marianne Coldham Williams (1793-1879) and Jane Nelson Williams (1801-1896) who were resident at the Paihia mission station in the 1823-1835 period. Initially appointed to ‘improve the condition of women in New Zealand’ whose situation was described as ‘far more degraded than that of males’, the Church Missionary Society (CMS) recognised that the labour of women was essential to the success of the mission. This is a preprint of an article submitted for consideration in the History of Education © 2005 [copyright Taylor & Francis]; History of Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/

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  • Jumping the fences : Maori women’s resistance to missionary schooling in northern New Zealand 1823 - 1835

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2001)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This is a preprint of an article submitted for consideration in the Paedagogica Historica © 2001 copyright Taylor & Francis; Paedagogica Historica is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/ with the open URL of your article, which would be the following web address: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0030%2d9230&issue=1&spage=175&volume=37

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  • Mothering a hospitalized child: it’s the 'little things' that matter

    Gasquoine, Susan (2005)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper reports one aspect of a phenomenological study that described the lived experience of mothering a child hospitalised with acute illness or injury (Gasquoine, 1996). The significance for mothers of nurses doing the ‘little things’ emerged in considering the implications of the findings of my study for nurses in practice. Seven mothers who had experienced this crisis within twelve months of the first interview agreed to share their stories. The resulting data were analysed and interpreted using van Manen's (1990) interpretation of phenomenology. This description of mothering in a context of crisis is useful in the potential contribution it makes to nurses' understanding of mothers' experience of the hospitalisation of their children. It supports the philosophy of family-centered care and highlights the ability of individual nurses to make a positive difference to a very stressful experience by acknowledging and doing 'little things' because it is the little things that matter to the mothers of children in hospital.

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  • From a Suva gossip column to Fleet Street - Hack's Progress by Phillip Knightley

    Cass, Philip (1999)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    To readers outside the United Kingdom, Australian-born journalist Philip Knightley will probably be best known for his books such as The First Casualty and The Secret Life of Lawrence of Arabia. In his autobiography, now released in paperback, he talks about some of the more famous stories he has worked on ...

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  • Baptism Of Fire - How Journalism Students From The University Of The South Pacific Covered The Speight Putsch And Its Aftermath

    Cass, Philip (2002)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    During the violent coup staged by businessman George Speight in Fiji in May 2000, accurate information about what was happening was often restricted to a handful of Fijian websites. On some occasions the only site still operating—and the only source of information for readers outside Fiji—was the one run by the journalism programme at the University of the South Pacific. Journalism students began to cover the unfolding events as an academic exercise but, before long, their newspaper and its associated website became vital links to the outside world. Despite attempts to suppress it, the student website was often the sole source of news for people outside Fiji as commercial websites went off line. Their work was rewarded with international acclaim, including awards for journalism education. Ten months later, the journalism students were again on assignment, reporting the complexities of the elections that followed the coup.

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  • Commentary on Ministry of Education. (2002). Guided reading: Years 1-4. Wellington, NZ: Learning Media.

    Blaiklock, Ken (2004-01-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

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  • The Pacific mission press

    Cass, Philip (1997)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The missions were the first to bring printing presses to the region and usually the first to establish a newspaper in the various islands. Despite their limited circulations, church newspapers are still important because of their role in preserving local languages and because of their historical function.

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  • Manipulation that we now take for granted

    Cass, Philip (2012)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Reviews and discusses the book 'Media and Terrorism', a book which looks at the relationship between the media and the current ‘war on terrorism.’

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  • Varieties of Us: a case study in boundary and landscape in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Woodruffe, Paul; Henderson, Ian (2011-03-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    On Auckland‟s North Shore a narrow strip of cliff-top land overlooking the Hauraki Gulf includes a memorial park, historic WW2 defensive artefacts, Maori fortifications and a section of the New Zealand Walkway, and is edged by both historic public housing and private residences, with a diversity of boundary conditions and internal landscape treatments. Cadastral boundaries, the markers of surveyed legal ownership of land, are often understood as the determining elements of landscape conditions and treatments, whether intentionally designed or not. These particular edges limit the perception, attribution and design of the continuity of the landscape, and also of other possible boundaries or determinants of difference. This paper explores the signs, symbols and cues of territorial claim, ownership, occupancy, access, use and edge condition, to reveal a richness of landscape beyond the limitations of the duality of public/private based on cadastral lines or of the third space of in-between-ness, often seen as one of difference. Traditional indigenous Maori land occupation and guardianship may add a potential reinterpretation to this diversity, challenging these cadastral demarcations. The methodology “the everyday collective laboratory”, a graphic story telling of the landscape, is used to explore and illuminate the complex issues of territorial claim and boundary treatment discovered at the site. This is done by using a combination of mapping, fine art methodology, normative landscape architectural site analysis and graphic design to produce a document that is both analysis, and an informing of design potential through “representing the site as fields of relations rather than as arrangements of objects.” (Marot, 2003, p2. ). This methodology also enables memory to become a material and a dimension for landscape architecture within the suburban condition through its ability to draw out narrative.

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  • Encompassing multiple moral paradigms: A challenge for nursing educators

    Caldwell, Elizabeth Shirin; Lu, Hongyan; Harding, Thomas (2010-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Providing ethically competent care requires nurses to reflect not only on nursing ethics, but also on their own ethical traditions. New challenges for nurse educators over the last decade have been the increasing globalization of the nursing workforce and the internationalization of nursing education. In New Zealand, there has been a large increase in numbers of Chinese students, both international and immigrant, already acculturated with ethical and cultural values derived from Chinese Confucian moral traditions. Recently, several incidents involving Chinese nursing students in morally conflicting situations have led to one nursing faculty reflecting upon how moral philosophy is taught to non-European students and the support given to Chinese students in integrating the taught curriculum into real-life clinical practice settings. This article uses a case study involving a Chinese student to reflect on the challenges for both faculty members and students when encountering situations that present ethical dilemmas.

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  • Bridging the digital divide: Students’ access to digital technologies in a language department

    Hobbs, Moira; Haines, Karen (2010-01-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In many institutions in New Zealand from primary to tertiary level, the use of technology by both students and teachers to support learning and teaching is assumed. This article reports briefly on research done in a New Zealand tertiary institution in order to discover students‟ perceptions of their access to and use of computer technologies. As well as giving a general overview of feedback from the 161 English as a Second or Other Language (ESOL) students in the study, responses are analysed in relation to age, gender and nationality groups. Results suggest that general access for students is high, but that differences exist in relation to gender and nationality. Such individual differences must always be considered by classroom teachers and accounted for as much as possible, as teachers continue to integrate technology use into their classroom practice.

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  • The use of suggestion systems as a tool to solicit input from internal customers

    Wilson, Gregory; Du Plessis, Andries; Marx, Andrew (2010-11)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Organisations, as part of their ongoing commitment to improve their bottom line will often focus marketing activities on feedback from their external customers and suppliers. The internal customer can also play an important role in providing vital commentary via suggestions or ideas that could enhance company performance. The authors studied organisations in New Zealand to see how their suggestion systems operated and how effective they were from both a managerial and an employee perspective. It was found that management at all levels needed to be properly trained in implementing an effective Ideas Generation Programme and that software should be used to administer and to manage the process. A diagram was developed by the authors to assist with the generating of the ideas system. Line managers should authorise implementation of suggestions that the internal customers put forth. In rewarding staff for their contributions, it was generally found that due to financial issues, higher level approval was needed for some form of remuneration. It was found that managers will always play a pivotal role in the success or demise of a suggestion system.

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  • International human resource management: An overview of its effect on managers in global organisations

    Du Plessis, Andries (2010-08)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    By managing international human resources (IHRM) correctly, it can enable a business to compete more successfully in the world market place. The last two decades have seen a gradual transition in style and substance from personnel management to human resource management, and recently to international human resource management. Human resource managers could consult local representatives of an overseas business regarding: local culture, employment aspects, safety, customs and traditions in order to operate in harmony with a local company’s procedures; different ethical and business standards can also lead to negative experiences. Because of various changes in socio-economic and legal-political requirements that differ from country to country designing remuneration packages could be different from ‘domestic-based’ human resource management. Doing business globally is a critical and important step because of the possible incompatibility of perceptions or standards in the company’s human resource’s policies and practices. It is not easy to manage pay packages of staff in a large multi-national company who are all earning at different rates; employees are more satisfied if they feel they are being paid what they are worth, especially those who are seconded to work overseas for a specific period.

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  • Qualities and practices of professional social work leadership in an interdisciplinary mental health service : an action learning approach

    McNabb, David; Webster, Michael (2010-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary leadership in mental health settings aims to advance quality of service and fill social work leadership gaps resulting from structural changes created by health policy initiatives. In the context of limited research into these changes, this paper presents an action learning organic approach examining how social work professional leaders implemented Kouzes’ and Posner’s ‘exemplary leadership’ in a District Health Board. This examination integrates indigenous Māori approaches to leadership with Western models. Findings suggest both caution and optimism about the professional leader role. The paper suggests further research to explore the relationship of professional leadership and clinical governance in public health services.

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  • Owners’ perception of carboplatin in conjunction with other palliative treatments for cancer therapy

    Bowles, Danielle; Robson, Mark; Galloway, Pru; Walker, Lyndon (2010-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    OBJECTIVES: To determine owners’ perception of their pet’s quality of life during treatment with carboplatin for a variety of canine and feline neoplasms. METHODS: Owners were contacted via a postal questionnaire and asked questions regarding their perception of chemotherapy in pets and their perception of carboplatin treatment in their pet. RESULTS: Twenty-eight (59%) of owners responded to the questionnaire. Forty-three percent of owners had not considered chemotherapy in pets before treatment; however, after treatment, 89% of owners supported its use. Sixteen (57%) patients had mild to severe side effects. Most patients experienced mild side effects, including lethargy and loss of appetite. Quality of life during treatment was reduced compared with prediagnosis quality of life however at its best was significantly improved compared with pretreatment quality of life. Eighty-nine per cent of respondents did not regret treating their pet. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Carboplatin is well tolerated by both owners and pets. Most patients have either no side effects or experience mild lethargy or inappetence. Carboplatin treatment, either alone or in conjunction with other medications, should be considered as a palliative treatment in both dogs and cats with susceptible neoplasms.

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