1,328 results for Journal article, 2007

  • In through the out door: Drivers of training supported by New Zealand organisations.

    Blumenfeld, S.; Malik, A. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Factors affecting employer support for internal, external and industry training are assessed using data from the Business New Zealand Skills and Training Survey 2003. Explanatory factors considered in this analysis are the size, location and age of the organisation, the industry in which the organisation operates, the gender composition of the organisation's workforce, the extent of workforce casualisation, average employee skill level and qualifications earned, and the concentration of those skills and qualification within the organisation. Measures of these factors are specified in logistic regression models in which the likelihood the organisation invests in on-site (internal), off-site (external) and/or industry training is included as the dependent variable. Results from this analysis suggest that the industry in which a firm operates and use of casual and part-time staff are the most significant drivers of New Zealand employers' willingness to invest in on-sight and industry training. Geographic location manifests a positive influence on firm investments in training provided off-site.

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  • Grinding and cutting accidents.

    Walsh, M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Toolbox/tailgate safety meetings.

    Walsh, M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses how to go about holding effective on-site safety meetings.

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  • Making the right choice.

    Walsh, M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Making the "right" choice.

    Barrett, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Examines the practical application in the workplace of "libertarian paternalism", a theory that suggests that exercising control over the structure of choice options can improve people�s welfare without reducing their personal autonomy.

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  • Developing a sector-wide general disposal authority: A district health boards of New Zealand case study.

    Cossham, A. F.; Siatiris, K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Documents the process taken by Archives New Zealand and the District Health Boards (DHBs) on creating a General Disposal Authority (GDA). Lists lessons learned during the development of this project.

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  • �Off balance sheet law�: Globalisation, accounting and democracy.

    Barrett, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    National governments commonly facilitate neo-liberal globalisation by permitting private bodies to apply global commercial rules locally. The recent legislating of international financial reporting standards (IFRSs) in New Zealand is an important example of privatised lawmaking. IFRSs can be described as "off balance sheet law" because they do not appear on the statute books, yet have legal effects. This article draws on a broad conception of discursive democracy to demonstrate the fundamentally anti-democratic nature of privatised lawmaking that the legislating of IFRSs exemplifies. First, an outline is given of the organisations and processes involved in the legislation of IFRSs in New Zealand to demonstrate how privatised lawmaking works. Second, the importance of IFRSs is considered in the light of basic principles of discursive democracy. Finally, alternatives to standardisation are considered.

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  • Continuing professional development: Perceptions from New Zealand and Australian accounting academics.

    Zajkowski, M.; Sampson, V.; Davis, D. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • A measure of serenity: A fresh look at well-being.

    Boyd-Wilson, B. M.; Walkey, F. H.; McClure, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Display of empathy and perception of out-group members.

    Yabar, Y.; Hess, U. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether empathy, when shown by a member of a stigmatized out-group, increases liking and rapport, and whether this effect generalizes to the out-group as a whole. Eighty-nine participants were asked to narrate a sad autobiographical event in the presence of a confederate who was either an in-group or an out-group member. During the interaction, the confederate either kept a neutral demeanour throughout or showed facial expressions congruent with the story content. Overall, participants rated both the in-group and the out-group confederate more positively when they displayed a congruent facial expression. However, this increase in liking did not generalize to the out-group to which the confederate belonged. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for multicultural countries, including New Zealand.

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  • Strengthening indigeneity through whakapapa and Maori pedagogy.

    Williams, N. M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    As societies grow more and more multicultural every day, it becomes increasingly important to challenge our practices; to make them more relevant to these changing contexts. In this article Ngaroma Williams provides an introduction to Maori pedagogy and calls on nations to support their indigenous peoples' identities - by telling their stories and educating their beliefs.The article explains the Maori concepts and beliefs of taha wairua (spiritual health), taha whanau (family health), taha hinengaro (psychological health), and taha Tinana (physical health).

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  • Sex ratios, fruit set and size-class structure in the threatened, gynodioecious, sand-dune species Pimelea arenaria (Thymelaeaceae) from New Zealand.

    Merrett, M. F. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Pimelea arenaria sens. str. Cunn. is one of a small suite of native species that occur exclusively on unconsolidated sand dunes and in dune hollows of the North Island and Chatham Islands of New Zealand. It has become extinct at several beaches, and is currently listed in the Gradual Decline category of threatened plants. Eighteen populations of P. arenaria from throughout the North Island of New Zealand were investigated to determine sex ratios, fruit set and population size-class structures. Sex ratios were variable among the 18 study populations; the proportion of females was higher in populations in the northern half of the North Island (15.9�45.5%) than in populations from Kawhia southwards (0�12.7%). Females were absent from three south-western coastal populations. Although fruit set was relatively high, averaging 47% for female and 68% for hermaphroditic plants, recruitment failure was evident at most of the 18 sites surveyed. There was no evidence that sex ratios or fruit set were factors contributing to recruitment failure. Although most of the populations surveyed are not under immediate threat, lack of recruitment could affect population persistence in the long term.

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  • Developing quality assurance metrics for assessment design.

    Shneider, E.; Gladkikh, O. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Assessing students ensures a minimum degree of accomplishment through the educational process and is thus a vital element in the development of high quality education programs. The main objective of the research project described here was to improve and simplify the process of assessment design. This paper represents the next step in our project suggests an algorithm for the calculation of quality assurance metrics for assessment question sets, and illustrates the application of a new algorithm to the evaluation of a sample examination.

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  • Pollination performance and vulnerability to pollination breakdown of sixteen native shrub species from New Zealand.

    Merrett, M. F.; Robertson, A. W.; Peterson, P. G. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The reproductive biology of 16 native shrub species was studied in 34 populations to identify breeding systems, pollen limitation, local abundance, and population age structures. Seven of the study species are hermaphroditic, seven dioecious, and two gynodioecious. One of the 18 hermaphrodite populations (Alseuosmia macrophylla at Mamaku Plateau) had high levels of self-incompatibility and pollen limitation and mutualism failure was evident. In the gender-dimorphic taxa, two populations (Coprosma spathulata from Hakarimata and Cyathodes juniperina from Pukemokemoke) had high levels of pollen limitation and insect-pollinated species consistently ranked higher in a vulnerability assessment compared with wind-pollinated species. There was no significant relationship between natural fruit set and the distance to the nearest conspecific pollen in any of the study populations. Seedling recruitment was variable but evident in 32 of the 34 study populations and appeared to be related to availability of suitable habitat. The species we studied occur mostly on forest edges where they rely on disturbed soil and high light conditions for establishment, and edges may be important for successful reproduction of some native plants, especially shrubs. We have demonstrated that plants with self-incompatibility mechanisms and pollinator specialisation are at greater risk from pollen limitation and mutualism failure than self-compatible or generalist species.

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  • Distant greener grass? Lessons for South Africa from New Zealand's experience of new public management.

    Barrett, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Between 1984 and 1999, a bipartisan elite of like-minded actors led the transformation of the New Zealand public service from a classical bureaucracy into a complex of competitive organisations informed by market principles. These changes, commonly referred to as 'the New Zealand model', were essential for a radical re-imagining of New Zealand society in commercial terms. As South Africa seeks ways to improve its public service, lessons may be learnt from the New Zealand experience of reformed public management.This article investigates that possibility. First, essential background is provided and an outline is sketched of the New Zealand political and constitutional context and of the ways in which the New Zealand public service was restructured. Second, adopting Jurgen Habermas's conception of democratic discourse as a critical benchmark, restructured public management in New Zealand is measured against criteria familiar to South Africans in the constitutional era. Finally, having outlined developments in New Zealand public management after 1999, tentative proposals are put forward for lessons that South Africa might learn from New Zealand's experience of new public management.

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  • Personal protective equipment (PPE).

    Walsh, M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Balancing individuals' expectations and organisational requirements for continuing professional development.

    Cossham, A. F.; Fields, A. J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Communication interventions for diversity management in a new company: Lessons from KwaZulu-Natal.

    Mersham, G. M. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Can we measure the value of an auditor's judgement?

    Sahrawat, K.; Davis, D. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Subterranean storage pits for kumara (sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas L. Lam.): Ethnographic, archaeological and experimental research in New Zealand.

    Davidson, J.; Leach, F.; Burtenshaw, M. K.; Harris, G. F. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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