2,690 results for Journal article, 2011

  • Anthropometric profile of male amateur vs professional formula windsurfs competing at the 2007 European Championship.

    Cortell-Tormo, J. M.; Perez-Turpin, J. A.; Cejuela-Anta, R.; Chinchilla-Mira, J. J.; Marfell-Jones, M. J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This study aimed to describe the current anthropometric profile of Formula Windsurf competitors during the 2007 European Championships and establish a set of reference values useful for future investigations on player selection, talent identification, and training programme development. Fourty?five male participants (mean age 30�9.77 years; body height 182.04�6.3 cm; body mass 81.67�7.35 kg) were selected for the anthropometric profile, including 15 which the International Windsurf Association had defined as professionals. The anthropometric profiles included measurements of skinfolds, segment lengths, breadths, and girths. Somatotype measurements were also calculated into the equation. The male professional windsurfers had larger length, breadth, and girth measurements than their amateur counterparts. The three somatotype components showed that both groups were predominantly mesomorphic, but the professionals were more ectomorphic than endomorphic, whereas the amateurs were slightly more endomorphic than ectomorphic. The descriptive analysis of the anthropometric data provide relevant information concerning the morphological indicators of competitive success in this sporting discipline.

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  • Nursing registration - a time to celebrate

    French, P. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Your books are in the mail: Fifty years of distance library service at Massey University

    Clarke, P. S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The nature of democratic decision-making and the democratic panacea.

    Shaw, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    "Democracy thrives because it helps individuals identify with the society of which they are members and because it provides for legitimate decision-making and exercise of power." With this statement, the Council of Europe raises for us some fundamental questions: what is the practice of democracy, its merits and its limitations? A phenomenological insight into democracy as it displays itself indicates that its essence is decision making by vote. The strength of this mechanism is that it operates without a requirement for rationality on the part of the participants, and its imperative is always to achieve a decision - any decision. Thus, the mechanism enables decisions in situations of incommensurable choice. The history of the engagement of Maori with local government in Aotearoa New Zealand makes apparent the limitations of democracy and challenges democracy itself. Maori have no tradition of democracy and they aspire to the exercise of their traditional decision-making practices. As a minority in a democratic country, Maori find themselves always at the mercy of the vote. Democracy is a tool of colonisation. The situation of M?ori provides lessons for those who would applaud the Council of Europe and their belief in coexistence by way of democratic decision making.

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  • Keeping the information profession up to date: Are compulsory schemes the answer?

    Broady-Preston, J.; Cossham, A. F. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper explores issues in relation to the contribution and importance of mandatory continuing professional development (CPD) in re-energizing and motivating the information profession. Set within the context of developing our understanding of the concept of 'professionalism' for the contemporary information profession, the mandatory schemes offered by professional associations in the UK and New Zealand are compared and contrasted, and an assessment made of their pros and cons in this regard.

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  • Obtaining high retention and completion rates in a New Zealand ODL environment: A case study of strategies employed by Information and Library Studies faculty at the Open Polytechnic.

    Maathuis-Smith, S.; Wellington, S.; Cossham, A. F.; Fields, A. J.; Irvine, J.; Welland, S.; Innes, M. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Open and distance learning (ODL) provides unique challenges for student retention and course completion. In an increasingly competitive educational environment, measures such as retention and completion form the basis for the evaluation of institutional and student performance. Information and Library Studies (ILS) faculty at the Open Polytechnic achieve and maintain consistently high retention and completion rates across their faculty-taught ODL courses. This research documents the development and application of strategies that contribute to these high success rates. Information and Library Studies faculty, through a framework of action research, undertook an analysis of implementation strategies designed to support student retention and completion. This framework provided a methodological foundation for focus-group discussion. The faculty evaluated and disseminated the strategies derived from these focus-group discussions across other ILS courses in an iterative process of application and analysis. Strategies for retention and completion in this research are discussed in the context of course selection, orientation, layered support, communication between students and faculty, support between student and faculty, social interaction, and community building in an ODL environment.

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  • Flexible learning: Reflecting on a decade of library and information studies programmes at the Open Polytechnic.

    Irvine, J.; Cossham, A. F. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the changes in undergraduate library and information studies education in New Zealand over the past decade. It considers developments in the delivery of distance education, focusing on e-learning (or flexible learning) modes, and changes to the curriculum due to the changing nature and requirements of the profession.

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  • Navigating New Zealand’s water management.

    Fisher, R. M.; Russell, S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This article summarises recent water policy and legislative reform in New Zealand, and describes some initiatives to address water challenges undertaken by researchers, investors, the financial sector, and policy makers.

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  • Survey of evidence-based practice use and understanding among final (5th) year medical students in South-East Asia

    Martis, R.; Ho, J.; Crowther, C. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The SEA-ORCHID project (South East Asia - Optimising Reproductive Child Health in Developing countries) initiated a survey among undergraduate medical students at five South-East Asia universities to ascertain their understanding of evidence-based practice, information seeking practices, access to Information Technology and evidencebased databases as well as their understanding of clinical practice guidelines. The survey took place during August to December 2006 and was completed by 172 fifth year undergraduate medical students. The findings from this survey indicate that fifth year undergraduate medical students from the participating five South East Asian universities need to be well equipped in knowing what databases exist, how to search these and how to critically appraise the information obtained. This need, plus a lack of exposure to clinical practice guideline appraisal and development, highlights some of the issues medical students encounter when attempting to learn and practice evidence-based practice effectively.

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  • Strength and conditioning practices in rowing

    Gee, T.; Olsen, P.; Berger, N.; Golby, J.; Thompson, K.G. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There is limited published research on the practices of strength and conditioning (S &C) coaches in Great Britain. Information about training program design would be useful in developing models of good practice and ecologically valid intervention studies. The aim of this research was to quantify the training practices of coaches responsible for the S&C of rowing athletes. A questionnaire was developed that consisted of 6 sections: (a) personal details, (b) physical testing, (c) strength and power development, (d) flexibility development, (e) unique aspects of the program, and (f) any further relevant comments regarding the athletes prescribed training program. Twenty-two rowing and 10 S&C coaches with an average of 10.5 ± 7.2 years' experience agreed to complete the questionnaire. Approximately, 34% coached rowers of Olympic standard, 34% coached national standard, 3% coached regional standard, 19% coached club standard, and 10% coached university standard rowers. All coaches agreed that strength training enhanced rowing performance and the majority (74%) indicated that athletes' strength trained 2-3 times a week. Almost all coaches (94%) reported their rowers performed strength training, with 81% using Olympic lifting, and 91% employing a periodized training model. The clean (63%) and squat (27%) were rated the most important prescribed exercises. Approximately 50% of coaches used plyometrics such as depth jumps, box drills, and standing jumps. Ninety-four percent indicated they conducted physical testing on their rowers, typically assessing cardiovascular endurance (80%), muscular power (70%), muscular strength (70%), and anaerobic capacity (57%). This research represents the only published survey to date on the S&C practices in rowing within Great Britain.

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  • The EU as a force to ‘Do good’: the EU’s wider influence on environmental matters

    Fini, M. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This research paper examines the capacity of the EU to exercise its influence in relation to environmental matters beyond its Member States. More specifically, this paper identifies that EU law and policy has the potential to influence environmental laws and business practices in New Zealand. Two hypotheses are put forward: first, that the EU can use its market force in such a way as to influence laws in third countries such as New Zealand - that is, relatively small countries seeking economies of scale and for whom the EU represents a valuable market. It is suggested that such influence can be observed in New Zealand through a spill-over effect in product standards for those goods exported to the EU and sold within New Zealand. Secondly, it is argued that the EU overcomes legal jurisdictional limits by relentlessly pursuing the adoption of its environmental policies and practices outside the EU through international consensus.

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  • Social exclusion and poverty: Translating social capital into accessible resources

    Boon, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article investigates the dynamic multi-dimensional processes through which the poor become excluded from social participation. Drawing on social capital literature, it traces how bridging and bonding capital do not always translate into expected levels of social participation. It does so by detailing research findings from low income focus groups undertaken in Dunedin, New Zealand. These describe the experiences of group members in attempting to manage connections around employment, their own broader social participation or the participation of their children. In each case, the study highlights the difficulties of translation they experienced: in particular, translating available bridging or bonding capital into useful social, cultural or economic resources which could mitigate their social exclusion or enable fuller social participation.

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  • Sport-specific power assessment for rock climbing

    Draper, N.; Dickson, T.; Blackwell, G.; Priestley, S.; Fryer, S.; Marshall, H.; Shearman, J.; Hamlin, M.; Winter, D.; Ellis, G. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    AIM: The popularity of rock climbing has resulted in a growing research base for the sport. However, at present there is a lack of sport-specific measures of performance in the field. The aim of this study was to examine the use of the powerslap test as a sport specific power measure. METHODS: The participants in this study were categorised into four different ability groups (novice, intermediate, advanced and elite) based on self reported lead grade. Two separate experiments were conducted to determine validity and reliability. The powerslap test was conducted on a revolution board with two variations – wide and narrow grip, for both sides of the body. The test started with the climber hanging at full extension from two holds from which a pull up movement was made releasing one hand to slap a scaled score board above. RESULTS:There was a significant relationship between powerslap scores and climbing ability (Left Wide: r=0.7, P<0.0005). Limits of agreement and intra-class correlation indicated that the powerslap test is a reliable performance measure. CONCLUSION:According to the present findings the narrow grip variation of the powerslap test is a useful sport-specific power test that is related to climbing performance.

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  • Picturing peace

    Pauli, D. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • The impact of emotions on practicum learning

    Maidment, J.; Crisp, B. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Nine mature aged, experienced practitioners enrolled to gain a BSW qualification in social work were interviewed regarding a course requirement to complete the first placement. At the time of interview no recognition of prior learning for previous experience in the field was made possible for these students. As educators we had experienced considerable hostility from students who believed they should be exempt from completing this course requirement. This paper reports on interviews with the nine students, where we consider how student sentiment about completing the practice learning component might impact upon their learning experience. As anticipated, some students expressed strong negative views about being on placement. However, others were much more positive about the experience. These mixed views prompted us to explore further the relationship between emotion and practice learning. The article begins with a review of the literature concerning mature student engagement with tertiary education, followed by an overview of theory and research related to the ways feelings and emotion influence learning. Using passages from the interviews, expressions of participant anxiety, anger and excitement about the practicum are discussed with the view to extending discourse about practicum learning to include consideration of emotional intelligence and investment.

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  • The sub-Antarctic mite Ayersacarus: a new species from mainland New Zealand, and its isotopic ecology (Acari: Mesostigmata: Leptolaelapidae)

    Clark, J.; Hawke, D. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Ayersacarus woodi sp. n. (Acari: Leptolaelapidae) is described from Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica Falla) burrows at Punakaiki, South Island, New Zealand. The genus has previously been reported only from sub-Antarctic islands. The new species is most like A. plumapilus Hunter (type species) but differs from it in females in the size and shape of the epigynal shield; much larger metapodal shields; and a wider than long anal shield with lateral pores. The ecology of the new species was explored using stable isotope (13C/12C; 15N/14N) analysis of females alongside contextual data from the site. From the 13C/12C results, the new species is dependent on marine C from petrels rather than terrestrial photosynthetic C. In terms of trophic level, the isotopic data are consistent with consumption of guano decomposers or their eggs.

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  • Chemistry in Canterbury: 1986 - 2010

    Edmonds, M.; Robinson, W.; Saunders, D. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The most significant constant in the 25 years since 1985 would have to be the ongoing appointments of well qualified, ambitious, experienced academic staff in the Department of Chemistry. Financial constraints have seen the number of established positions shrink from 23 to 18 at the same time as chemistry has spilled well beyond its historical subdivisions. Teaching the current, discernable, main stream topics in the traditional areas of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry is, consequently, that much more demanding. University teachers have research interests in areas that demand proficiency in new knowledge, much of which did not exist 25 years ago.

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  • Do low risk women actually birth in their planned places of birth, and does ethnicity influence women's choices of birthplaces?

    Hunter, M., Pairman, S., Anderson, J., and others (6) (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data focuses on place of birth outcomes for low risk women. This was the type of information I explored in my Masters Thesis. Since the thesis was published there has been more focused interest in birth at home and in primary units. Do women actually birth where they planned to and if not why might that be. The research identified that transfer rates from low risk birthing places are slightly lower than internationally recorded. Also identified that Maori and pacific women transfer less. There are a number of hypotheses surrounding these results and will lead to further research.

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  • Constructing ePortfolios with mobile phones and Web 2.0

    Chan, S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper provides rationalisation, description and evaluation of a project using mobile phones and web 2.0 sites to collate eportfolios. The paper will firstly provide a brief introduction to the context in which the project has been carried out. An overview of what has taken place in mlearning, eportfolios and web 2.0 that is relevant to this project will then be discussed. Reports on the various parts of the project, findings and results then follow. The paper concludes with a summary of the future work on mlearning pedagogy.

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  • Nurses' role in caring for people with a comorbidity of mental illness and intellectual disability: A literature review

    Taua, C.; Hepworth, J.; Neville, C. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article examines literature on the role of the nurse caring for people with a dual disability (DD) of intellectual disability and mental illness. A search of the literature between 2000 and 2010 resulted in a total of 21 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Seven key categories of the role of the nurse were identified: (i) advocacy/health promotion (including working with family); (ii) assessment/case management; (iii) behavioural interventions; (iv) communication; (v) leadership and the nurse's role within the multidisciplinary team; (vi) functions regarding medication administration; and (vii) safety/risk management. There is a paucity of research about the role of nurses working with people with DD, although a number of opinion-based articles exist. This article identifies a need for the role of the nurse working in DD to be more clearly articulated and for the development of evidence to guide best practice.

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