1,145 results for Journal article, 2014

  • Ōtautahi revisted: Urban regeneration and a sense of identity in the rebuilding of Christchurch.

    Strongman, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper explores the concept of place and identity with regard to the rebuilding of Christchurch (Ōtautahi), New Zealand’s second largest city following the devastating earthquakes of September 2010 and February 2011. The process of rebuilding following a natural disaster is determined by the utility, character, ambiance, habitude, and experience of identity expressed in the process of reconstruction and the environment it supports. For Christchurch, the largest city in New Zealand’s South Island (Te Wai Pounamu) in which approximately half of the city centre was destroyed and must be re-built, rebuilding consists of reconstructing previous architecture, overlaid with a modern architecture. As Gauzin-Muller has stated, “[c]onsideration of environmental issues in construction projects has economic, ecological, and social implications” (2002, 9). While there is a huge physical, financial, and cultural problem to solve in clearing land, designing buildings for repopulated areas, and remediating land for rebuilding, there is also a tremendous opportunity in for engineers, architects, landscape architects, and planners to redesign and construct new sustainable buildings, precinct, and recreational areas for central Christchurch.

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  • Te Ara Whakapikioranga.

    Te Moananui-Makirere, J.; King, L.; Eruera, M.; Tutukino, M.; Maoate-Davis, S. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Student engagement in distance-based vocational education.

    Yates, A.; Brindley-Richards, W.; Thistoll, T. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Students enrolled in distance education courses tend to have lower course completion rates than those who attend face-to-face classes (Simpson, 2013). This article reports on a collective case study undertaken at a vocational, distance education provider in New Zealand, whose course completion rates have risen over recent years to match those of similar face-to-face institutions. This research investigated institutional factors that have contributed towards this improvement, from the perspectives of the staff involved. Results show staff believe there are key enablers and barriers to student engagement and course completion, but the barriers are not insurmountable. The implication is that distance education providers can improve student engagement and completion rates through effective interventions.

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  • Perezhivanie: What have we missed about infant care?

    Brennan, M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Take AIM and keep your students engaged.

    Nash, C. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper outlines the benefits to distance education teachers of formatting a weekly online newsletter in accordance with motivational learning theory. It reflects on the delivery of weekly AIM newsletters to undergraduate economics students at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand via Moodle. The acronym, AIM, stands for Academic content, Information for the course and Motivation—three critical elements required to meet the challenges of effective course facilitation. The AIM newsletter integrates all three of these key components in one easy-to-use product. The object of AIM is to keep students engaged in economics and reduce the perceived distance from distance education. This article discusses the context, underpinning theory, practicalities, and the way forward for AIM.

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  • Engaging learner support: An investigation of faculty–library collaboration to provide live course-specific learner support in the online classroom environment.

    Fields, A. J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Postgraduates performing powerfully in a changing academic environment.

    Hutcheson, G.; Diprose, G.; Stevenson, J.; Tadaki, M.; Thomas, A. C.; Todd, C. (2014-04)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Link to the journal website and abstract here - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nzg.12020/abstract

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  • KIAORA - The emerging construction of a bicultural professional supervision model.

    King, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The KIAORA model is the culmination of responding to the challenge of constructing a personal model of professional supervision within a bicultural worldview. Matauranga Maori and kaupapa Maori is the turangawaewae for construction of a personal model of professional supervision for a Tangata Whenua social work practitioner seeking to transform the Aotearoa New Zealand professional supervision space.

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  • Dialogue, non–dialogue and dissemination—Ancient questions, contemporary perspectives.

    Mersham, G. M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    With the advent of the Internet, the promise of dialogue has become the holy grail of communication. The idea of communication without dialogue is not a popular one. Decades of critique of the unidirectional messages of the mass media, controlled by powerful institutional agents of power, has been damning. Those who aspire to dialogue often have a moral rejection of one-way forms of communication. A misunderstanding of one-way and persuasive communication has created a skewed view of the role and place of dialogue in public relations. This article explores the philosophical underpinnings and key features of dialogue and its antithesis, non-dialogue, or dissemination within the communication field. It revisits some of the propositions made by the ancient Greeks and modern theorists about communication and dialogue, and how multiple interpretations of what constitutes a dialogue have become blurred. It considers the idea that in recent times dialogue has been uncritically equated to ‘good’ communication and that one-way communication is ‘bad’ or, at least ‘less than best’. The article argues that both forms are equally important and have existed in the thoughts of theorists and philosophers throughout the ages. While the discussion focuses on this premise from a communication perspective, reference to public relations and marketing activities in the context of social media and the Internet are made. Dialogue requires a sense of exchange, interchange, mutuality, and some sense of reciprocity.

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  • Postcolonialism and international development studies: A dialectical exchange?

    Strongman, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    ‘Postcolonial studies’ is the term given to the study of diaspora and the ideology of colonialism. Since the 1970s, when postcolonial studies was termed ‘Third World’ literature, and the 1980s, when it became ‘Commonwealth’ literature, the persistence of the framework of centre and margin, coloniser and colonised, has endured as a lens with which to view human identity and cultural expression. However, the relationship of postcolonial studies to international development is less well explored. Much of postcolonial studies is concerned with articulating patterns of gain, loss, inclusion, exclusion, identity formation and change, cultural evolution and human geographical dispersal in the wake of the after-effects of colonial rule. Postcolonial critics examine texts and images in order to make inferences about the significance of cultural identity and expression under these conditions. Often this is with a diachronic view of history. International development studies offers postcolonial critics a synchronic perspective on both the policy and materiality of political ideologies affecting cultural identity and expression. This paper looks at how the relationship between postcolonial and international development studies might be furthered in a dialectical exchange. Postcolonial critics such as Said and Pollard et al offer a critical understanding that informs policy making in international development contexts.

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  • The psychology of social undermining in organisational behaviour.

    Strongman, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The purpose of this article is to define ‘social undermining’ and to discuss its causes and effects within an organisational context. Central to social undermining is the effect of moral disengagement, which is the main precursor to the manifestation of social undermining in personal and professional behaviours. Possible causes and motivations for the social undermining of others and behavioural symptoms in its victims are examined. Reasons for why social undermining is important for organisations, employees, and the effect of it on workplace behaviours within organisations are then explored. Employee and organisational reputation are discussed in the context of social undermining as a workplace stressor and as existing on a continuum of supportive and/or derogative workplace behaviours.

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  • The role distance learning has to play in offender education.

    Seelig, C.; Rate, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This article looks into the uses of digital and online tools in distance learning to improve literacy and numeracy of offenders in New Zealand prisons. Looking at the benefits and restrictions of digital education within the prison environment, this article discusses the solutions that Open Polytechnic, in partnership with the the New Zealand Government, has put in place to give prisoners further opportunity for rehabilitation, and ultimately prepare them for re-entry into society, the workforce or further study.

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  • You are not worth the risk: Lawful discrimination in hiring.

    Scholes, V. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Increasing empirical research on productivity supports the use of statistical or ‘rational’ discrimination in hiring. The practice is legal for features of job applicants not covered by human rights discrimination laws, such as being a smoker, residing in a particular neighbourhood or being a particular height. The practice appears largely morally innocuous under existing philosophical accounts of wrongful discrimination. This paper argues that lawful statistical discrimination treats job applicants in a way that may be considered degrading, and is likely to constrain people’s freedoms in relation to employment, thus giving us reason for moral concern.

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  • A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mika, J.P.; O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This is a conceptual article located in the discourses of indigeneity, post-colonialism and critical management studies in which we seek to renew interest in Māori management as a distinctive form of management within Aotearoa New Zealand. We discuss defining Māori management and Māori organisations and their relevance for today's organsiations in New Zealand and internationally. We examine differences and similarities between Western and Māori management in terms of the four functions of management adapted from principles first proposed by Fayol in 1949. We propose a theoretical model of Māori management and discuss the implications of Māori management for management research, policy and practice.

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  • www.useless.com: Crisis communications on shaky ground

    Vavasour, K (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that struck the city of Christchurch on February 22, 2011, the physical and communications infrastructure that many city dwellers rely on suddenly ceased to function. For many, this disruption to physical and virtual networks resulted in access to media, information, assistance and family being cut off or restricted in a number of different ways. Survey results show residents of the less-damaged suburbs made more use of television, websites and social media than those in badly damaged areas, who relied more on radio, word-­of-mouth, and print material. Social media and new technologies are now an established part of the crisis communications discourse; however, the infrastructure they rely on is not as solid and reliable as it may appear. After exploring the concept of blackboxing, the failures and weaknesses of previously backgrounded objects exposed by the earthquakes provide examples of its undoing (un-blackboxing). Quantitative and qualitative survey data is used to show how variations in location and disruption impacted on the information-­seeking of residents, and how the un-­blackboxing of infrastructure and socio-­technical networks left residents out of the loop. This research also challenges perceptions of how widely used, accessible and/or useful technologies like Twitter are to those in the middle of a disaster.

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  • Exploratory factor analysis of the clinical learning environment, Supervision and Nurses Teacher Scale (CLES+T)

    Watson, P.B.; Seaton, P.; Sims, D.; Jamieson, I.; Mountier, J.; Whittle, R.; Saarikoski, M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background and Purpose: The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES1T) scale measures student nurses’ perceptions of clinical learning environments. This study evaluates the construct validity and internal reliability of the CLES1T in hospital settings in New Zealand. Comparisons are made between New Zealand and Finnish data. Methods: The CLES1T scale was completed by 416 Bachelor of Nursing students following hospital clinical placements between October 2008 and December 2009. Construct validity and internal reliability were assessed using exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Exploratory factor analysis supports 4 factors. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from .82 to .93. All items except 1 loaded on the same factors found in unpublished Finnish data. The first factor combined 2 previous components from the published Finnish component analysis and was renamed: connecting with, and learning in, communities of clinical practice. The remaining 3 factors (Nurse teacher, Supervisory relationship, and Leadership style of the manager) corresponded to previous components and their conceptualizations. Conclusion: The CLES1T has good internal reliability and a consistent factor structure across samples. The consistency across international samples supports faculties and hospitals using the CLES1T to benchmark the quality of clinical learning environments provided to students.

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  • New erythraeids (Parasitengona) from recent glacial outwash, Southern Alps, New Zealand; Callidosoma, Momorangia, Grandjeanella, and Pukakia gen. nov.; with a description of the deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki

    Clark, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Callidosoma susanae sp. nov., Momorangia chambersi sp. nov., Grandjeanella macfarlanei sp. nov. and Pukakia aoraki gen. nov., sp. nov., are described from recent glacial outwash in a braided river bed, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Two species previously placed in Momorangia Southcott, 1972 are removed. Neomomorangia Fain and Santiago-Blay, 1993 stat. nov. from Brazil is given generic status, and a Kenyan species is moved to Charletonia Oudemans, 1910 as Charletonia gabini (Haitlinger 2004b) comb. nov. Grandjeanella emanueli Haitlinger, 2010, Grandjeanella londaensis Haitlinger, 2011 and Callidosoma matsumuratettix Tseng et al. 1976 are left as species inquirendae. Pussardia Southcott, 1961, Harpagella Southcott, 1996 and Pukakia gen. nov. are placed in Abrolophinae, Witte, 1995. New host records are given for Callidosoma tiki Southcott, 1972 and Momorangia jacksoni Southcott, 1972. The deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki is described.

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  • High intensity interval training in a real world setting: A randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen intake

    Lunt, H.; Draper, N.; Marshall, H.C.; Logan, F.J.; Hamlin, M.J.; Shearman, J.P.; Cotter, J.D.; Kimber, N.E.; Blackwell, G.; Frampton, C.M.A. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training) improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot) study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. Methods: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention) were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg), before and after the 12 week interventions. Results: On ITT (intention to treat) analyses, baseline (N = 49) and exit (N = 39) _VVO2 was 25.364.5 and 25.363.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N = 16, 24.264.8/25.664.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.062.8/25.263.4; walking N = 17, 26.565.3/25.263.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, 20.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and 21.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03). The actual (observed, rather than prescribed) time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis) was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p = 0.001). On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. Conclusions: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a cohort of overweight/obese participants undertaking aerobic interval training in a real world setting was modest. The most likely reason for this finding relates to reduced adherence to the exercise program, when moving beyond the research clinic setting.

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  • Export barriers in a changing institutional environment: A quasi-longitudinal study of New Zealand's manufacturing exporters

    Kahiya, E.T.; Dean, D.L.; Heyl, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The primary gap in export barrier literature has been the lack of studies adopting a longitudinal research design to examine this phenomenon. This vital and timely research addresses this long standing void by investigating the influence of export barriers at two specific points in time, 1995 and 2010. Examining the influence of export barriers across time is fundamental for aligning export development programmes with exporter needs and also for helping export managers craft winning strategies. Following a careful review and synthesis of extant literature, the study uses changes in the exporters’ institutional environment to predict change in the influence of export barriers. Data are drawn via simple random probabilistic samples of manufacturing exporters, from the same working population, using an identical survey instrument. Discriminant analysis results show that the influence of export barriers differs markedly over the two periods as evidenced by the classification accuracy of 85 %. There is support for the overarching hypothesis that export barrier influence is traceable to the changes occurring in the institutional or task environment. Specifically, deregulation of the economy, commitment to free trade, increased adoption of information and communication technology communication and floating of the exchange rate appear to shape the influence of export barriers for New Zealand exporters. Thus, while past research ascribes change in export barrier influence to organizational and internationalization variables, our study suggests that over time the institutional environment can explain export barrier influence. The study makes the case for policymakers to better align export development programmes with prevailing barriers while challenging export managers to revisit and augment the skill sets required for export success.

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  • An exploration of influences on women’s birthplace decision-making in New Zealand: a mixed methods prospective cohort within the Evaluating Maternity Units study

    Grigg, C.; Tracy, S.; Daellenbach, R.; Kensington, M.; Schmied, V. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: There is worldwide debate surrounding the safety and appropriateness of different birthplaces for well women. One of the primary objectives of the Evaluating Maternity Units prospective cohort study was to compare the clinical outcomes for well women, intending to give birth in either an obstetric-led tertiary hospital or a free-standing midwifery-led primary maternity unit. This paper addresses a secondary aim of the study – to describe and explore the influences on women’s birthplace decision-making in New Zealand, which has a publicly funded, midwifery-led continuity of care maternity system. Methods: This mixed method study utilised data from the six week postpartum survey and focus groups undertaken in the Christchurch area in New Zealand (2010–2012). Christchurch has a tertiary hospital and four primary maternity units. The survey was completed by 82% of the 702 study participants, who were well, pregnant women booked to give birth in one of these places. All women received midwifery-led continuity of care, regardless of their intended or actual birthplace. Results: Almost all the respondents perceived themselves as the main birthplace decision-makers. Accessing a ‘specialist facility’ was the most important factor for the tertiary hospital group. The primary unit group identified several factors, including ‘closeness to home’, ‘ease of access’, the ‘atmosphere’ of the unit and avoidance of ‘unnecessary intervention’ as important. Both groups believed their chosen birthplace was the right and ‘safe’ place for them. The concept of ‘safety’ was integral and based on the participants’ differing perception of safety in childbirth. Conclusions: Birthplace is a profoundly important aspect of women’s experience of childbirth. This is the first published study reporting New Zealand women’s perspectives on their birthplace decision-making. The groups’ responses expressed different ideologies about childbirth. The tertiary hospital group identified with the ‘medical model’ of birth, and the primary unit group identified with the ‘midwifery model’ of birth. Research evidence affirming the ‘clinical safety’ of primary units addresses only one aspect of the beliefs influencing women’s birthplace decision-making. In order for more women to give birth at a primary unit other aspects of women’s beliefs need addressing, and much wider socio-political change is required.

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