1,417 results for Journal article, 2016

  • The Independent Left Press and the Rise and Fall of Mass Dissent in Aotearoa since the 1970s

    Boraman, TN (2016-03-10)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    false

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  • Dual-Band Waveform Generator With Ultra-Wide Low-Frequency Tuning-Range

    IBTISAM A. ABBAS AL-DARKAZLY; Hasan, SMREZAUL (2016-07-07)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    false

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  • Managing surveillance: Surveillant individualism in an era of relentless visibility

    Ganesh, S (2016-01-15)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    false

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  • Fraud and Firm Performance: Keeping the Good Times (Apparently) Rolling

    Malone, CB; Finnerty, JD; Hegde, SD (2016)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    false

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  • Molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter coli strains isolated from different sources in New Zealand between 2005 and 2014

    Nohra, A; Grinberg, A; Midwinter, AC; Marshall, JC; Collins-Emerson, JM; French, NP (2016-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    © 2016, American Society for Microbiology.Campylobacteriosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases worldwide and a significant health burden in New Zealand. Campylobacter jejuni is the predominant species worldwide, accounting for approximately 90% of human cases, followed by Campylobacter coli. Most studies in New Zealand have focused on C. jejuni; hence, the impact of C. coli strains on human health is not well understood. The aim of this study was to genotype C. coli isolates collected in the Manawatu region of New Zealand from clinical cases, fresh poultry meat, ruminant feces, and environmental water sources, between 2005 and 2014, to study their population structure and estimate the contribution of each source to the burden of human disease. Campylobacter isolates were identified by PCR and typed by multilocus sequence typing. C. coli accounted for 2.9% (n = 47/1,601) of Campylobacter isolates from human clinical cases, 9.6% (n = 108/1,123) from poultry, 13.4% (n = 49/364) from ruminants, and 6.4% (n = 11/171) from water. Molecular subtyping revealed 27 different sequence types (STs), of which 18 belonged to clonal complex ST-828. ST-1581 was the most prevalent C. coli sequence type isolated from both human cases (n = 12/47) and poultry (n = 44/110). When classified using cladistics, all sequence types belonged to clade 1 except ST-7774, which belonged to clade 2. ST-854, ST- 1590, and ST-4009 were isolated only from human cases and fresh poultry, while ST-3232 was isolated only from human cases and ruminant sources. Modeling indicated ruminants and poultry as the main sources of C. coli human infection. Importance: We performed a molecular epidemiological study of Campylobacter coli infection in New Zealand, one of few such studies globally. This study analyzed the population genetic structure of the bacterium and included a probabilistic source attribution model covering different animal and water sources. The results are discussed in a global context.

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  • Does Viagra protect fetal lambs against maternal pregnancy toxaemia?

    Peterson, SW; Pain, SJ; McCoard, SA; Oliver, M; Baker, PB; Kenyon, PR; Blair, HT (2016-07-07)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Poor fetal growth is commonly caused by placental insufficiency. In sheep, multiple fetuses have relatively small placentae with fewer cotyledons than singletons, limiting blood flow to the placenta, especially in late gestation when fetal growth rate is highest. Factors that reduce fetal growth, such as maternal genotype, nutrition, age, parity, fetal number, or environmental temperature, typically reduce placental size and are associated with lower rates of fetal oxygen and nutrient uptakes and placental blood flow (Reynolds & Redmer 2001). Further, circumstances that influence placental vascular development have a dramatic impact on fetal growth and development, and affect neonatal survival and growth (Borowicz et al. 2007; Satterfield et al, 2010). Sildenafil citrate (SC, trade names Viagra or Avigra) increases vasodilatation of uteroplacental vessels (Wareing et al. 2005) and may represent a novel therapy to improve fetal lamb growth. Sildenafil citrate has successfully increased birth weight in rodent models and singleton bearing ewes (Satterfield et al. 2010; Miller at al. 2009). There is no published information regarding the use of SC in multiple-bearing ewes. The objective of this trial was to determine if SC administration to triplet-bearing ewes in late gestation could increase lamb birth weight. In addition, the influence of SC on the incidence of pregnancy toxaemia is also reported here.

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  • Reflections on international comparative education survey methodology: a case study of the European Survey on Language Competences

    Ashton, K (2016-05-03)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Accepted

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  • Contribution to Hagger et al (2016). A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect

    Philipp, MC; Cannon, PR (2016)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion. Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [−0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control.

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  • Does ewe nutrition during pregnancy affect the neonatal behaviour of twin-born lambs?

    Gronqvist, GV; Hickson, RE; Corner-Thomas, RA; Kenyon, PR; Stafford, KJ; Morris, ST (2016-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    false

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  • Antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes target airway CD103+ and CD11b+ dendritic cells to suppress allergic inflammation

    Daniels, NJ; Hyde, E; Ghosh, S; Seo, K; Price, KM; Hoshino, K; Kaisho, T; Okada, T; Ronchese, F (2016-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Allergic airway inflammation is driven by the recognition of inhaled allergen by T helper type 2 (Th2) cells in the airway and lung. Allergen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can strongly reduce airway inflammation, however, the mechanism of their inhibitory activity is not fully defined. We used mouse models to show that allergen-specific CTLs reduced early cytokine production by Th2 cells in lung, and their subsequent accumulation and production of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. In addition, treatment with specific CTLs also increased the proportion of caspase+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mediastinal lymph node (MLN), and decreased the numbers of CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs in the lung. This decrease required expression of the cytotoxic mediator perforin in CTLs and of the appropriate MHC-antigen ligand on DCs, suggesting that direct CTL-DC contact was necessary. Lastly, lung imaging experiments revealed that in airway-challenged mice XCR1-GFP+ DCs, corresponding to the CD103+ DC subset, and XCR1-GFP− CD11c+ cells, which include CD11b+ DCs and alveolar macrophages, both clustered in the areas surrounding the small airways and were closely associated with allergen-specific CTLs. Thus, allergen-specific CTLs reduce allergic airway inflammation by depleting CD103+ and CD11b+ DC populations in the lung, and may constitute a mechanism through which allergic immune responses are regulated.

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  • Growth of early weaned lambs on a plantain-clover mix compared with lambs suckling their dam on a plantain-clover mix or a grass based sward

    Cranston, LM; Corner-Thomas, RA; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST (2016-07-07)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Plantain-clover mixes have high metabolisable energy content and have been shown to support greater liveweight gains in lambs both pre- and post-weaning when compared with grass. The aim of this experiment was to determine if a plantain-clover mix could be used as a means to wean lambs earlier. Twin-bearing ewes (n=67) with both lambs at a minimum live weight of 16 kg each were allocated to one of three treatments; 1) ewe and lambs together on grass, 2) ewes and lambs together on plantain- clover mix, 3) lambs weaned at approximately 8 weeks of age onto a plantain-clover mix and ewes on grass. Lambs that were weaned early were lighter (P<0.05; 3.1±0.05 vs 2.9±0.05 vs 2.9±0.05, respectively) than those which remained with their lambs on either a plantain-clover mix or grass. This suggests early weaning improved ewe condition but did not improve lamb performance

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  • Maria Clara for the 21st Century: Filipino Responses to “Neo-Colonial” Encounters

    Diaz Rodriguez, JM (2016-09-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    As an example of a postcolonial critique to certain hegemonic Spanish discourses in the Philippines, this essay examines the practice-as-research dance piece Love, Death, and Mompou (2006), which was a revision of the traditional María Clara dance suite. It argues that the show uses the expressiveness of the body as a trigger to subvert, re-represent and perform a range of “colonial” discourses that were reinforced by Spanish cultural producers, through funding policies, such as the Spanish Program for Cultural Cooperation. In this context, this essay argues that these policies echo a colonial past by influencing the local arts scene, and by establishing what can be perceived as a “neo-colonial” relationship between Spanish official institutions and those local artists involved in the arts events.

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  • Enhancement, disability and the riddle of the relevant circumstances

    Zohny, Hazem (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    The welfarist account of enhancement and disability holds enhanced and disabled states on a spectrum: the former are biological or psychological states that increase the chances of a person leading a good life in the relevant set of circumstances, while the latter decrease those chances. Here, I focus on a particular issue raised by this account: what should we count as part of an individual's relevant set of circumstances when thinking about enhanced and disabled states? Specifically, is social prejudice relevant to an individual's circumstances in regards to how disabled or enhanced they are? For instance, if an individual is discriminated against on the basis of their skin colour, and this leads to a reduction in their well-being, the welfarist account suggests that their skin colour is a disability. To avoid such a seeming mislabel, Savulescu and Kahane have argued for excluding social prejudice from counting as a relevant circumstance to their welfarist definition of disability. I argue, however, that this exclusion of social prejudice is unsatisfactory and incompatible with the goals of this account.

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  • Scripted Spaces: The Geopoetics of the Newspaper from Tret'iakov to Prigov

    Edmond, Jacob (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This essay examines Sergei Tret’iakov’s and Dmitrii Prigov’s turn to the newspaper in their search for a symbolic form adequate to the geopolitical fl ux at the beginning and endpoints of Soviet history. Fusing the epic and the sublime with the modernist montage principle, both present the newspaper as embodying simultaneously totalizing and disintegrative imaginings of space. Refl ecting his avant-gardist and statist commitments, Tret’iakov’s news paper-epic and ocherk journalism figure the tension between socialist internationalism and socialism in one country and between federal and centralist models of the state. Prigov’s newspaper art embodies the contrary pressures of resurgent nationalisms and globalization in perestroika-era and post- Soviet Russia. Having linked the decline of print culture to the Soviet Union’s demise, Prigov addresses the return of an imperial Russian spatial imaginary by highlighting how the tension between spatial boundlessness and totality in the print newspaper anticipates and complicates the information sublime of the digital age.

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  • Evaluating the impact of energy interventions: home audits vs. community events

    Scott, Michelle; McCarthy, Alaric; Ford, Rebecca; Stephenson, Janet; Gorrie, Seth (2016-01-09)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    New Zealand’s housing stock tends to be of low thermal quality that can adversely affect the health and well-being of occupants as well as costing more than necessary to heat. Householders need information and motivation to make material changes and adopt new practices to achieve warmer and more energy-efficient homes. This study compares two different types of energy interventions with householders in three different suburbs in Dunedin, New Zealand. Two suburbs received a home energy audit whereby an auditor surveyed each house and provided personalised advice. Householders in the third suburb took part in community energy events that included general advice and practical workshops. The impacts of these interventions were evaluated through pre- and post-intervention surveys and post-intervention interviews. Home energy audits were successful in encouraging change both behavioural and practical, where it was possible. The energy events promoted community engagement and awareness relating to energy-saving actions. Participant feedback suggests that a combination of both types of intervention may be most effective in promoting household change, beginning with energy events in communities before offering home energy audits. This would enable people to share their thoughts and concerns about energy with the support of their social networks and engender trust in the process, before offering personalised audits. Overall, the results show that interventions need to be correctly targeted to appropriate communities to be effective.

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  • The New Zealand Coroners Amendment Bill's Proposed Approach to Healthcare-Related Deaths that are Reportable to the Coroner

    Moore, Jennifer; Stokes, Tim; Gray, Ben (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    When must a death that occurs in a health care setting be reported to the coroner? This article explores this question by analysing the New Zealand (NZ) Coroners Act 2006 and the amendments to the health care-related deaths provisions in the Coroners Amendment Bill 2014 (NZ). At the time of writing, the Bill was at the Select Committee stage. This article examines whether the amendments may improve the inconsistent clinical and coronial practices with respect to reportable health care-related deaths. It concludes that, while the proposed amendments are an improvement on the current legislative drafting, doubt remains about whether they will solve the challenges presented by health care-related reportable deaths. The second and third readings of the Bill should give serious consideration to the submissions received by the NZ Law Commission that express the view that the Queensland or Victorian legislation should be used as models.

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  • Understanding the energy consumption choices and coping mechanisms of fuel poor households in New Zealand

    McKague, Fatima; Lawson, Rob; Scott, Michelle; Wooliscroft, Ben (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    One in four households in New Zealand are fuel poor. A growing body of evidence links the technical and economic aspects of this phenomenon, however comparatively little research has focused on the wider social impacts. The behavioural and social interactions associated with fuel poverty have not taken centre stage in the literature. This study presents, through fuel poor households’ voices, the realities of living in energy hardship, and the impact on day to day lives. Our research finds that fuel poverty impacts widely on the quality of life of participants, and highlights the barriers and support systems in place that may hinder or help their circumstances. This in depth, multi-faceted portrayal of fuel poverty will aid in policy development and contribute to efforts to curtail fuel poverty in New Zealand.

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  • Improving publication: advice for busy higher education academics

    Gibbs, Anita (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    A major challenge for higher education academics is to research and publish when faced with substantial teaching responsibilities, higher student numbers, and higher output expectations. The focus of this piece is to encourage publication more generally by educators, and to build publication capacity, which academic developers can facilitate. The author’s experience as a busy social work educator highlights the potential for educators in such fields as teacher-training, nursing, medicine and other professional disciplines, to make better use of their daily work material in publication.

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  • Deletion of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 from forebrain neurons delays infertility and onset of hypothalamic leptin resistance in response to a high fat and high sucrose diet

    McEwan, Hayden; Inglis, Megan; Quennell, Janette; Grattan, David; Anderson, Greg (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This archive contains supplementary material to the main paper published in Journal of Neuroscience.

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  • Change trends in urban freight delivery: a qualitative inquiry

    Hopkins, Debbie; McCarthy, Alaric (2016-06-08)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In this paper we present the findings of a qualitative investigation of change trends in urban freight deliveries. The empirical material was gathered with urban freight (courier) company managers and drivers in Aotearoa New Zealand. It presents personal accounts of the everyday lived experiences of those intimately involved in the delivery of goods within the urban environment. Twenty five interviews were conducted across four urban centres between June and September 2015. We use the four elements of the Energy Cultures Framework to explore what urban freight managers and drivers ‘have’, ‘do’ and ‘think’, and the pressures of an external context. Four interrelated themes are presented, 1. Online shopping and home deliveries, 2. Tracking and transparency, 3. New technologies, and 4. Meeting (changing) expectations, with evidence provided by way of verbatim quotations. The ‘mobility cultures’ concept is used to explore the relationships between the four themes, and to identify the key change trends that may affect the ability of the freight industry to contribute to a low-carbon transport transition. We conclude by signalling some policy implications and future research directions.

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