22,242 results for Journal article

  • Measuring preferences: What are the MBTI word pairs and phrase questions doing?

    Bathurst, J.; Geyer, P. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Measuring preferences

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  • National culture and e-government readiness.

    Kovacic, Z. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The importance of nonverbal elements in online chat.

    Gajadhar, J.; Green, J. S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The use of nonverbal elements in text-based virtual interactions in an online chatprovides participants with some of the richness of real-time, face-to-face interactions.

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  • The role of an electronic discussion list in community formation: A case study of NZRecords.

    Oliver, G. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Has the Statute of Frauds been rendered nugatory?

    Barrett, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The Statute of Frauds and Perjuries 1677 s 4, which requires the terms of oral guarantees to be recorded in writing, has been imported and retained by certain overseas jurisdictions, including Western Australia. Along with this statutory requirement, the attendant issue of the extent to which equity may intervene to allow enforcement of an imperfect guarantee has been transplanted. Typified by the House of Lords decision in Actionstrength Ltd v International Glass Engineering [2003] UKHL 17; [2003] 2 AC 541, English courts have generally adopted a restrictive approach to equitable estoppel, particularly regarding the application of this doctrine to the Statute of Frauds. Since the landmark case of Waltons Stores (Interstate) Ltd v Maher [1988] HCA 7; (1988) 164 CLR 387, Australian courts have generally adopted a wider approach to equitable estoppel and one seemingly incompatible with English law in this regard. The recent case of Tipperary Developments Pty Ltd v The State of Western Australia [2009] WASCA 126 confirmed that equitable estoppel could specifically outflank the Statute of Frauds. This decision appears to widen the gap between the two conceptions of equitable estoppel still further, and raises the question whether the Statute of Frauds has been rendered nugatory in Western Australia, if not elsewhere. This note discusses Tipperary Developments and considers these possibilities.

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  • Time capsule: Exploration of concepts of law and time in colonial New Zealand.

    Barrett, J.; Strongman, L. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Postcolonial legal culture in New Zealand (Aotearoa) has sought to revise the past by reinterpreting Victorian legal contexts in the light of contemporary understandings of inter-cultural differences. This article develops an argument that demonstrates the relationship between cultural and legal notions of time during nineteenth century New Zealand. It examines the way in which Victorian attitudes were expressed in the expansion of colonial empire and the discursive ideologies which may have informed them. It explores the notion of time as expressed in lawmaking in colonial New Zealand through an examination of legal and philosophical commentary derived from contemporary jurisprudence and para-legal literature. The article is concerned with presenting an argument for the way in which colonial law and lawmakers manipulated the symbolic notion of time to the possible occlusion of indigenous interests in colonial New Zealand.

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  • Breaking ties: Interpreting very low MBTI scores.

    Bathurst, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • A measure of serenity: A fresh look at well-being.

    Boyd-Wilson, B. M.; Walkey, F. H.; McClure, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • ESP, serenity and enlightenment.

    Boyd-Wilson, B. M. (2008)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Display of empathy and perception of out-group members.

    Yabar, Y.; Hess, U. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether empathy, when shown by a member of a stigmatized out-group, increases liking and rapport, and whether this effect generalizes to the out-group as a whole. Eighty-nine participants were asked to narrate a sad autobiographical event in the presence of a confederate who was either an in-group or an out-group member. During the interaction, the confederate either kept a neutral demeanour throughout or showed facial expressions congruent with the story content. Overall, participants rated both the in-group and the out-group confederate more positively when they displayed a congruent facial expression. However, this increase in liking did not generalize to the out-group to which the confederate belonged. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for multicultural countries, including New Zealand.

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  • Flourish and thrive: An overview and update on positive psychology in New Zealand and internationally.

    Jarden, A. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    For many people the term �positive psychology� will draw a blank. For others, it will spark interest or even create excitement. Such is the current status of the field in New Zealand (NZ), and to a lesser extent, internationally. However, positive psychology has progressed substantially in its short 12 year history. I describe positive psychology, briefly review its development and history, outline a selection of current teaching and research in NZ, summarise its status within the wider government sector, and highlight a few interesting findings from the field to date. I also review trends in contemporary research and speculate as to where the field is heading in the future.

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  • Post-traumatic growth: An introduction and review.

    Jarden, A. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Stereotyping and action tendencies attributions as a function of available emotional characteristics.

    Philippot, P.; Yabar, Y. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The voluntary choice of an auditor of any level of quality.

    Davis, D.; Hay, D. (2004)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Serenity: Much more than just feeling calm.

    Boyd-Wilson, B. M.; McClure, J.; Walkey, F. H. (2004)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Force field: Vitruvian man and the physics of sensory perception.

    Strongman, L. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, a diagrammatical design of the human form in relation to its geometrical proportions, is one of the most enduring images of the European Renaissance. Vitruvian Man provides a key to the proportions of Vitruvius's architectural drawings contained in his Ten Books on Architecture, De Architectura. (The description of Vitruvian Man is formed from Book Three in particular). Completed in 1490, it was fashioned after drawings of the Roman architect/engineer Vitruvius who lived in 1BCE. Da Vinci sought to portray the symmetry of human form as both measurer and agent of civilisation. Da Vinci placed his diagrammatical interpretations of Vitruvius's writings inside a square and overlaid this with a circle representing a secular design of the human form in three-dimensional space. However, Vitruvian Man depicts not only a relationship of geometrical proportion but also a human 'performance model'. Whether Leonardo thought that the mathematical delineations pointed to an underlying implicate order, he did not directly write on the subject. Vitruvian Man represents the dividing moment between the natural world and the world of modern civil engineering and the human architectural environment. It is a founding document for the evolution of the Newtonian age and the recognition of humankind as the centre of civilisation.

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  • Indigenous suicide and colonization: The legacy of violence and the necessity for self determination.

    Lawson, K.; Liu, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Contemporary indigenous first nations psychologists have developed an alternative frame for viewing suicide that not only shifts the focus from individual-level to group-level explanations, but challenges discourses that position group-level influences as "risk factors" that can be easily subsumed within standard repertoires for suicide prevention. First nations psychologists show the violent legacy of colonization has left a dark shadow on the contemporary lives of young people, so that around the world, suicide rates for indigenous peoples are much higher than for non-indigenous peoples in the same country. These arguments, which rely on historical accounts, cannot be neatly demonstrated using empirical data, but form an important part of a self-determination movement among indigenous peoples, directly challenging unequal power relations in society as a means to seek redress for particular issues of inequity like rates of youth suicide. We present a theoretical case study and analysis of contemporary suicide among Maori youth in New Zealand. In a traditional Maori conceptualization, individual well-being is sourced and tied to the well-being of the collective cultural identity. Therefore, individual pain is inseparable from collective pain and the role of the collective becomes that of carrying individuals who are suffering. The state of kahupo or spiritual blindness (Kruger, Pitman, et al. 2004) is characterized by a loss of hope, meaning, and purpose and an enduring sense of despair. It bears the symptoms of chronic dissociation or separation of the physical from the spiritual and vice versa. We describe community empowerment practices and social policy environments that offer pathways forward from colonization towards tino rangatiratanga, or indigenous self-determination, noting significant obstacles along the way.

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  • Learning expectations of different ethnic groups: An exploration.

    Li, M.; Marshall, K.; Baker, T.; Isaac, M. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Learning expectations of different ethnic groups: An exploration

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  • Value dimensions of culture: Comparative analysis.

    Papazova, E.; Pencheva, E.; Moody, R.; Tsuzuki, Y.; Bathurst, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This article traces out and analyzes the Schwartz cultural value dimensions.

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  • An indigenous Maori potato or unique Maori cultivars?

    Harris, G. F. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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