304 results for Report, 1990

  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 4: The Expansion of Organic Food Production in Nelson and Golden Bay

    Coombs, Brad; Campbell, Hugh (1998)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents the fourth and final case study in a program of research on the changes within organic production in key regional areas of New Zealand. The four reports are the results of a body of research funded by the Public Good Science Fund and titled ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. Specifically, the present report examines the evolution of organic production in the Nelson/Golden Bay1 area of the South Island. During the early 1980s, inhabitants of that area were some of the first in New Zealand to become involved in sales of organic produce, with an even longer history of non-commercial, self-sufficiency oriented organic production. In this historical respect, the area stands in contrast to some of the other regions examined in the current series of reports. Of the other three, it is most similar to the situation in Canterbury (Campbell 1996), where organics also started in the domestic and informal sectors of the economy. However, while the domestic component of organics has grown in Canterbury, it has also become secondary in terms of both volume and value to the organic goods exported from that region. It is the lack of a sizeable export organic industry in Nelson which has drawn the attention of the current authors. Organic wine/grapes (Vitus vinifera), hops (Humulus lupulus), kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa), nashi (Pyrus pyrifolia) and bee products are exported from the Nelson region but their volume is relatively small when placed alongside the volume of exports in other organic producing areas with a similar number of producers. The relative absence of organic exporting means that the structure of the organic industry in Nelson is radically different from that in the export oriented Bay of Plenty (Campbell et al. 1997) and Gisborne District (Coombes et al. 1998). In the latter case, there is almost no sign of a domestic industry, this highlighting the differing extremes of regionalisation in New Zealand’s organic industry. While these comparisons are interesting, and while they will be made at various points throughout this report, extensive comparisons have been set aside for a future publication devoted singularly to that task.

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  • Planning a safe city for women

    Brewster, Karen E. (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 256 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 3: Exporting Organic Produce from Gisborne District

    Coombs, Brad; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (1998-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is the third in a series of four case studies on the evolution of organic production in key regional areas of New Zealand. The other three case studies are Canterbury (Campbell 1996), Bay of Plenty (Campbell et al.1997) and Nelson (to be completed in mid 1998). The four reports are the main outputs for the research program ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’, funded by the Public Good Science Fund. The current report presents the findings of research into the development of organic production in Gisborne District1 (see Figure 1.1). Although these findings are significant and stand in their own right as suitable for individual publication, some comparisons are made in the text between the evolution of organics in Gisborne and the development of organics in Canterbury and Bay of Plenty. This mainly involves comparisons between Gisborne and Canterbury, because organic crops and an individual company – Heinz-Wattie Ltd.2 – have been prominent in both areas. This enables the Gisborne case study to be more fully understood. Nevertheless, extensive comparisons are not made in this report: they have been set aside for a future publication to be completed after the Nelson report.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 2: Kiwifruit in the Bay of Plenty

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John; Steven, David (1997)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents the findings of research into the development of organic kiwifruit production in the Bay of Plenty. These results form the second of four case studies which constitute the Public Good Science Fund programme ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. The other case study regions are Canterbury (Campbell 1996), Gisborne (to be completed during 1997) and Nelson (to be completed by 1998). The primary objective of this report is to document developments in the organic export industry in the Bay of Plenty. Comparisons between Canterbury and the Bay of Plenty have occasionally been included in this report in order to provide more clarity about the development of organic production in the Bay of Plenty itself. While there is some discussion of the differences between Canterbury and the Bay of Plenty in the Conclusion, these are only brief. Full comparison of the regional factors influencing the development of organic exporting will be set aside until all four case studies have been completed.

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  • The Development of Organic Horticultural Exports in New Zealand

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (1998)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The following report presents a summary of findings from a series of publications arising from the FRST Public Good Science Fund programme ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. This research programme started in 1995, and in mid 1998 had completed three years of research into four regional case studies of organic export development. To date, there have been a number of reports and other publications which have sought to outline various aspects of organic agriculture in New Zealand1, contribute to reviews of the organic industry2, or attempt to situate organic developments in New Zealand within wider trends in world agriculture, politics and trade3. Given the wide content of these publications, the many different arenas in which they have been published, and the encouraging level of interest from members of the organic agriculture industry, it is timely that an attempt be made to provide a basic summary of the findings. The present report attempts to do this in a way that is accessible to participants in the industry, and which will attempt to answer key questions about the industry. The most important issue is identifying key factors involved in successful exporting of organic products.

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  • Strategies for 'Greening' the New Zealand Pipfruit Export Industry: The Development of IFP and Organic Systems

    McKenna, Megan; Campbell, Hugh (1999)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report provides an introduction to New Zealand’s pipfruit industry, and a review of different attempts within the industry to produce fruit which has an enhanced environmental or ‘food safety’ profile. While the New Zealand pipfruit industry has been recognised throughout its history as a producer of high quality fruit, in the last five years there has been increasing pressure from both consumers and trade regulators to formalise production practices that are ‘safe’ and guarantee minimum consumer risk through unacceptable chemical residues. Collectively we refer to these strategies as ‘greening’, however, as this report will detail, there are many factors prompting greening of exports and the potential strategic responses vary.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 1: Organic Food Exporting in Canterbury

    Campbell, Hugh (1996)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Since 1990, the exporting of certified organic produce has emerged as a new industry in New Zealand. Five provinces – Canterbury, Gisborne, Bay of Plenty, Hawkes Bay and Manawatu – provide the majority of exports with two business organisations – the Kiwifruit Marketing Board, and Wattie Frozen Foods Ltd. – being prominent in this. In 1990, a MAF report (MAF 1991) estimated that the total value of organic production in New Zealand (primarily directed at the domestic market) was around NZ$1.1 million. Since that time there has been a massive increase in the value of organic production, and in the 1995/ 96 year, the newly formed Organic Products Exporting Group assessed the export value of its members at NZ$12 million. Given that this ignored those few organisations outside the group and also did not assess the size of the domestic market, it could be conservatively estimated that the total annual value of organic product in New Zealand was NZ$15 million by 1996. While this figure is not large by comparison to some of New Zealand’s established export industries it is still around 25% of the export value of wine – one of the most high profile new primary production sectors in New Zealand.

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  • Strategies for 'Greening' the New Zealand Honey Industry: An Evaluation of the Development of Organic and Other Standards

    Bourn, Diane; Newton, Bronwyn; Campbell, Hugh (1999)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The overall aim of this research programme is to examine the ‘greening’ of five sectors within NZ Horticultural production - kiwifruit, wine, squash, apples and honey. This study of the honey industry comes at the later stages of a 5-year programme of research into the differing strategies that horticultural industries are deploying to respond to ‘greening’ pressures in markets. In prior studies into the processed vegetable - (Campbell, 1996), kiwifruit (Campbell et al., 1997), sweetcorn (Coombes et al., 1998) and organic fresh fruit and vegetable (Coombes and Campbell, 1998) industries, various factors were identified which have created a new trading environment for horticultural exports. Specifically, an environment in which increasingly stringent ‘food safety’ and ‘environmentally enhanced’ criteria are applied to food exports is developing - both at the regulatory level and in the purchasing preferences of distributors and consumers (Campbell and Coombes, 1999). While the overall findings of prior industry studies have identified a general trend towards ‘greening’ exports, the pressures for greening are felt unevenly through horticultural sectors and levels of response have also varied significantly. The purpose of the current series of industry studies is to identify the current configuration of horticultural industries towards greening, and to identify the kinds of social and industry dynamics which are influencing industry strategies (or inhibiting the formation of such strategies) in each sector. Each report therefore serves as a benchmark for each industry that can then be used to assess the overall movement towards sustainable practices in NZ horticulture.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Whiuwhiu o te Hau Maori Counselling Certificate Programme: Agency placements and supervision. Summary of and evaluation

    Moeke-Pickering, Taima Materangatira; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1995-01-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Three major characteristics in determining a potentially successful practicum were identified. Firstly, the importance of determining early on whether an agency can expose the student to the necessary counselling experience that enables students to meet the requirements of the course. Secondly, the importance of exposing students to information that enable them to efficiently achieve practicum placement goals. Thirdly, the need to utilise both reflective and skills based assessment to assess the development of counselling skills, as well as the completion of tasks and duties that are required of students. Further information was gleaned about the research participants' perspectives on supervision procedures, practicum contracts, benefits of having a practicum placement and suggested training areas for the proposed TWH supervision module.

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  • Stratigraphy and reserves of pumiceous sand deposits in Perry's 'Asparagus Block' at Horotiu

    Nelson, Campbell S.; Lowe, David J.; Lootsma, A (1997)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The stratigraphic relationships between the deposits of the Hinuera Formation and the Taupo Pumice Alluvium are described over a 16 ha plot of land known as the 'Asparagus Block' at Horotiu. The Hinuera Formation is exposed at the surface at the southern end of this block, and is overlain by a wedge of Taupo Pumice Alluvium which increases in thickness from 0 to 8 m northwards across the block. Lithofacies in the Hinuera Formation are dominated by trough cross-bedded gravelly sands (lithofacies AI), with common cross-laminated sands (lithofacies B) and massive to horizontally laminated silts (lithofacies D). The pumice content of these deposits is mainly 70%. Lithofacies in the Taupo Pumice Alluvium are dominated by horizontally to inclined (tabular cross-) bedded slightly gravelly sands and sands (lithofacies G 1/2), with common occurrences of horizontally bedded to massive sandy silts (lithofacies D). The pumice content of these Taupo deposits is high, typically >80%. Cross-sections are presented showing an interpreted subsurface distribution of these lithofacies from south to north through the 'Asparagus Block'. The estimated reserve of extractable pumice sand from the block is of the order of about 400,000 to 450,000 m³.

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  • Profile descriptions of Quaternary basaltic volcanogenic soils of the Mount Gambier area, southeast South Australia

    Lowe, David J. (1992)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The volcanoes of southeast South Australia form the western extension of the Newer Volcanics province of Victoria, and comprise two distinct groups: a northern Pleistocene group of 15 eruption centres in the Mount Burr range, and a southern Holocene group of two isolated eruption centres at Mounts Gambier and Schank (Fig. 1). All the volcanoes are basaltic and are formed predominantly of explosively-erupted fragmental (pyroclastic) products including ash, lapilli, and scoria; lava is less common and is rarely soil-forming (Irving & Green, 1976; Sheard, 1978; 1983a, b; 1986; 1990). Mounts Gambier and Schank are aged about 4000-5000 years old and are the youngest volcanoes on the Australian mainland (Fig. 2) (Barton & McElhinny, 1980; Barbetti & Sheard, 1981; Blackburn et al., 1982; Sheard, 1990). They were erupted through consolidated calcareous sands of the Bridgewater Formation, and the resultant pyroclastic deposits may contain up to 25% of non-volcanic material, chiefly limestone fragments (Sheard, 1990).

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  • Proposed changes in the classification of Histosols, Alfisols, Andisols, Aridisols, Inceptisols, Mollisols, Entisols, and Spodosols in South Australia

    Fitzpatrick, R.W.; Hudnall, W.H.; Lowe, David J.; Maschmedt, D.J.; Merry, R.H. (1992)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    As a result of intensive field and laboratory work being conducted in specific key areas in South Australia need for improvements and modifications to Soil Taxonomy have become obvious to several soil scientists. This report proposes some changes to the 1990 Keys to Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff, 1990) in order to provide more suitable categories for some soils in South Australia. These improvements were also identified and improved upon by several workers during a series of three Soil Taxonomy workshops held in South Australia during September and October, 1991.

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  • Soil-landscape modelling and soil property variability for forestry land evaluation in Longwood Forest, Southland. Phase 1: soil-landscape model development

    Jones, Hayden S.; Lowe, David J.; McLay, C.D.A. (1997)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Large scale, quantitative information about the variability of target soil properties is required for forest management. This project is attempting to determine whether or not the New Zealand Soil Classification system (NZSC), when used in combination with a soillandscape model, adequately communicates this information. In the first phase of this project a soil-landscape model was developed and a pilot variability study conducted. The soils in the study area, located in the W oodlaw Block of the Longwood Range, are formed from either Permian andesite or greywacke on moderately steep to steep hill slopes under a moist cool climate and a vegetation cover of beech and podocarp forests. The soil-landscape model was developed using the land systems approach. The model consists of predictive relationships between topographic features and soil classes. There is a clear relationship between slope steepness, the abundance of surface boulders and the gravel content of the soil. A soil-landscape unit map showing the distribution of predicted soil classes has been produced. The results of the pilot variability study have showed that the soils sampled are acidic and have moderate to high P-retention values. An analysis of variance indicated that both of these properties are significantly variable between sites and between horizons. There appears to be a relationship between land component type and the magnitude and variability of these properties. The clay mineralogical analysis revealed that the dominant clay minerals present in all the soils sampled are chlorite-vermiculite, kaolinite, sepiolite, and allophane. The presence of allophane and kaolinite may be related to the moderate to high P-retention values.

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  • Geoscientific reconnaisance of Perry Aggregates quarry, River Road, Horotiu

    Nelson, Campbell S.; Lowe, David J. (1997)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    At the request of David Jennings, Opus International Consul tan ts Ltd, Hamil ton, we visited the Perry Aggregates quarry on River Road, Horotiu, on the morning of Wednesday 23 April 1997 to comment on the geoscientific context of the quarry. Our specific remarks relate only to observations made at the pit face at the present northwestern extremity of the quarry, which nevertheless are probably appropriate for the quarry as a whole. The quarry area inspected lies on a low terrace about 8 m above present-day river level (about 15 m a.s.l.) immediately adjacent to the Waikato River and covers an area of about 180 x 250 m centred on approximate grid reference S14 029885 (1:50 000 topographic map series NZMS 260).

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  • Child pedestrian safety en route to and from rural schools: A case study

    Russell, Tonya; Westbrook, Tony; Swain, David (1999)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This research examines the safety hazards faced by child pedestrians at rural schools within the Waipa District. The main objectives of this research were to identify hazards child pedestrians face, to identify current counter-measures to these hazards, and to evaluate the regulations and policies pertaining to these counter-measures and child pedestrian safety. Meeting these objectives then allowed the design of possible counter-measures to the hazards faced by rural child pedestrians. The ultimate goal of this research was to improve child pedestrian safety at rural schools.

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  • An evaluation of the effectiveness of social equity strategies for Maori students in the School of Science and Technology

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1999-11-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In 1991 the School of Science and Technology (SOSAT) at the University of Waikato had a very low participation rate of Maori and students from other non-dominant ethnic groups. This situation was serious enough to concerned the then Dean of the School and strategies were developed to change this situation. Four major strategies are used to encourage, support and retain Maori students to successfully pursue and complete a degree in Science. They are: the Te Putahi o te Manawa programme - a mentoring programme; a scholarship and grant writing strategy (in particular assistance with Tuapapa Putaiao Maori Fellowships(TPMFs) administered by FRST); school visits; and field trips with secondary schools in the Waikato region that have a high proportion of Maori students. The Maori & Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) was contracted by Gary Bramley of the Equity Office of the SOSAT to conduct this evaluation. Evaluative information was gathered through administering questionnaires, completing key informant interviews, and completing focus group interviews. In this evaluation we sought to determine the effectiveness of the social equity strategies for Maori students in the SOSAT at the University of Waikato.

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  • An Audit of Ethnic Monitoring: West Midlands Regional Hospital Episode Statistics April - September 1995

    Lay-Yee, R; Gilthorpe, MS; Wilson, RC (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Consuming identity : modernity and tourism in New Zealand

    Taylor, John Patrick (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    What do visitors to New Zealand seek to gain from their travels, and in what ways are such expectations shaped? This work assesses the relationship between tourism-related discourse and identity, and ideas about distance and difference, by exploring aspects in the promotion and production of tourism products in New Zealand. Travellers to New Zealand often seek the "unspoilt" in nature, that which represents a beauty and "authenticity" seen to be lacking "at home". Likewise, infused with ideas regarding "ethnicity" and the traditional (as well as residual notions of the primitive or noble savage), images of Maaori in tourism are situated in relation to the "modern" tourist's self. For many travellers to New Zealand, alongside physical travel with its timetables and ticket stubs is a parallel symbolic journey through Time. Reversing Western narratives of progress and the Fall, the travellers' quest is to "unwind" the coils of technological - and often "intellectual" - Time. This work traces the fundamental ideological components of this world-view from the colonial period through to present-day tourism. What emerged in the early period of tourism development was the production and propagation of a pseudo-knowledge surrounding New Zealand's natural heritage and Maaori population. Although the last century has seen changes in styles of tourism, promotion, production, travel and tourist behaviour, it is argued that this prevailing system of representation continues to influence tourist perceptions of New Zealand and Maaori in negative ways. The ideas put forward by colonial writers concerning Otherness in nature and culture have remained as essential features of present tourism discourse. These have taken concrete form in a range of tourism related products which tend to promote a specifically modernist perception of place. Such works not only provide potential tourists with practical information about New Zealand as a holiday destination, but they also circulate within wider discursive fields that seek to legitimate ideological projects and further their cause.

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