978 results for Report, 2000

  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Marketing education: recommendations for targeting Asian students - Report 3

    Fam, Kim-Shyan; Simpson, Lisa (2001)

    Report
    University of Otago

    As shown in Report 2 of this series, the Asian market is proving to be an increasingly attractive area of opportunity for New Zealand tertiary educational institutions. Where Report 2 aimed to identify how New Zealand tertiary institutions could better target this lucrative market, this report aims to provide some distinct recommendations for tertiary educational services marketers attempting to enter the three countries used in the study. These recommendations are in terms of promotional message, promotional tools and media and key marketing strategies that are most effective in Malaysia, Hong Kong and Singapore.

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  • Increasing capacity at Monarch Wildlife Cruises and Tours: a case study approach

    Keenan, Victoria (2004-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Monarch Wildlife Cruises and Tours is a small eco-tourism business providing tours of the Otago Peninsula and an unrivalled wildlife cruise around Taiaroa Head. This company has continued to grow since its inception in 1985, but faces serious capacity constraints in the land transport aspect of its business. The purpose of this research is to examine options available to the company to increase their land transport capacity; the aim is to evaluate each option and recommend the most appropriate forward focus for the business. The research was conducted using a single case study methodology and involved four stages. These stages included a review of the academic literature, semi-constructed interviews, the collection of data through company documentation and observation as well as various discussions with potential organisations that lease and sell buses. Seven options for increasing the transport capacity of the company were investigated in this research. These were: staying with the status quo, withdrawing the transport from the tours, buying an additional bus, selling their van and buying or leasing an additional bus, selling all the vehicles or leasing them on long - term contracts. The last option investigated in this research was contracting all transport facilities to another party. Each option was analysed on cost, practicality, and its overall effect on the business. The benefits and disadvantages of each option were also discussed and contributed to the final decision. It is recommended that the transport aspect of the business be contracted out to another party. Further investigation will be required to determine the most appropriate organisation to contract to. Further work will also be needed to define the terms of such an agreement. However, at this stage Malcolm Budd from the Otago Explorer seems to meet all requirements. The recommended option was chosen because of its propensity to be cost effective and provide benefits that would outweigh cost. The disadvantages of this option were found to be minimal in that they would not adversely affect service quality or the core operations of the business, which is wildlife cruises. Lastly, the recommendation effectively increased the company's transport capacity and proved to be advantageous over the long term. Secondary recommendations included decreasing prices in the winter months to encourage people that might not otherwise purchase the tours; that the number of free of charge passengers be reduced in order to make room for paying customers, and to further manipulate demand and supply by allowing employees to leave secondary tasks till quieter periods, when the business is busy. The company also has the potential to diversify into other areas and increase customer involvement in the service delivery process by allowing customers to book and pay their tours on-line.

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  • Marketing education: a guide to better targeting of Malaysian students - Report 1

    Fam, Kim-Shyan; Thomas, Chris (2000)

    Report
    University of Otago

    As funding for tertiary education decreases, New Zealand tertiary educational institutions have been forced to fund existing services via other means. It has been suggested that tertiary institutions have attempted to target overseas students because of the high per student revenue received for this market segment. In particular, it has been suggested that New Zealand tertiary institutions have been particularly successful in marketing their product to Malaysian students. However, this segment seems to be growing faster internationally than observed in New Zealand, and as such, this study aims to identify how New Zealand tertiary institutions might better target this lucrative market segment. The current study examined a group of Malaysian students who had yet to make their decision regarding what country/institution they were going to attend, once their secondary education had been completed. The students were from a range of colleges and states in Malaysia. The students were administered a self-completion questionnaire, based on four specific topic areas: preferred promotional tools, preferred promotional messages, cultural values and socio-economic perceptions (of Malaysia compared to New Zealand). The aim of this survey was to determine whether there were any differences in students' choice of promotion tools and promotional messages. The study also attempted to examine the students' cultural values and their perceptions of the level of socio-economic development (in Malaysia compared to New Zealand). Additionally, 20 New Zealand marketers were also administered a similar questionnaire that sought to contrast the assumptions that these marketers had about the market they were attempting to target. As such, the current study has several implications for improving the effectiveness of the international marketing of New Zealand educational institutions. Demographically, the student respondents were from a range of religious beliefs and favoured a range of countries for further tertiary education. New Zealand was of particular importance to these students with 20% indicating that this was the country they favoured, with only the United Kingdom (22%) rating higher. The findings also revealed an array of differences in the students' choice of promotion tools and promotional messages. In particular, the WWW was the most common source for educational information. The second most important tool was print media. The promotion message that appealed most to the students was a quality learning environment, followed by the reputation of the Institution. Culturally, most Malaysian students were very traditional and respected both their elders and those in authority. They were also ambitious and yet open to new ideas. Socio-economically, the Malaysian students perceived their country's standard of education as relatively similar to New Zealand. However, they were less optimistic about Malaysia' standard of living. These differences in cultural values and socio-economic development could have caused the Malaysian students to value some promotion tools/messages as more important than the others. However, it is beyond the scope of this report to link cultural values and socio-economic development to the students' choice of promotion tools and messages. New Zealand marketers seem to have a rather firm grasp of the promotional messages that are particularly important to students, however they do not understand why these messages are important, nor do they understand what tools should be best utilised to most effectively promote to Malaysian students. Of particular concern in this area is the extent which New Zealand marketers over-value their own contribution, whilst ignoring particularly important promotional tools such as print media. This report then applied the findings of this study to New Zealand Universities’ marketing. In conclusion, the theme of these recommendations were that the New Zealand Universities should: "…Ask not what Malaysian students can do for New Zealand Universities, but what New Zealand Universities can do for the Malaysian students…” (Paraphrasing John F. Kennedy)

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  • New Zealand farmer and orchardist attitude and opinion survey 2008 : characteristics of organic, modified conventional (integrated) and organic management, and of the sheep/beef, horticulture and dairy sectors

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Benge, Jayson; Campbell, Hugh; Greer, Glen; Lucock, Dave; Manhire, John; Meadows, Sarah; Moller, Henrik; Saunders, Caroline; Fukuda, Yuki (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study of New Zealand farms (including orchards in the case of the kiwifruit sector). Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic green management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature and effects of production from these different management systems from environmental, economic and social points of view. A survey in 2005 provided the means to examine general farmer attitudes and practices and to assess what differences may occur in the different sectors and for farms under different management systems. It also provided the means to show that the panels were reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The ARGOS research design included a second survey in 2008 in order to test and elaborate on emerging research results. This report is the first presentation of the 2008 results.The questions asked of farmers were sourced from contributions from the team of ARGOS researchers drawing on results and issues in the literature, and from contemporary farming issues. These sources provided too many questions for one questionnaire. Accordingly, two questionnaires were used, one sent to a simple random sample of all New Zealand farmers and the other sent to separate random samples of each of the main farming sectors, namely sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture. The two surveys generated a large data set. In order to make the results easier to comprehend we have presented them in two separate outputs, as follows: 1. Analysis of the three main sectors (sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture) and the three main management systems (conventional, integrated and organic) (this report). 2. Analysis of agriculture generally (see companion report).

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  • Social objective synthesis report: differentiation among participants farmers/orchardists in the ARGOS research programme

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The main objectives of this report are to assess the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and to assess how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. The report is framed by a brief outline of the social dynamics of agricultural sustainability and the emerging significance of market audit systems as a key structuring feature of contemporary attempts to achieve more sustainable production systems. The findings are presented separately for the kiwifruit and sheep/beef sector. The report concludes with recommendations for transdisciplinary engagement among the ARGOS objectives. Overall the current set of ARGOS social data for the kiwifruit sector suggests that, while there is great similarity among the panels, the Organic panel demonstrates the greatest number of distinctive characteristics. The assessment of difference among kiwifruit panels reflects survey results (six variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (more obviously distinctive characteristics attributed to the Organic panel) and causal map analysis (Organic orchardists listed a greater number of factors). The other surveyed data and the sketch maps do not show many panel differences. These kiwifruit results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, orchard management approaches, scope of control, and on- and off-farm relationships. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Gold orchardists were closer to the Organic panel than the Kiwigreen panel (more double arrows and total connections in causal maps; a greater readiness to assume risk in the interviews). The sheep/beef results show that, once the many similarities among sheep/beef farmers are taken into account, the Organic panel again demonstrated several distinctive characteristics compared to the Conventional and Integrated panels. This assessment similarly reflects survey results (14 variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (distinctive response of Organic panel to several topics of enquiry) and causal map analysis (Organic farmers had a greater number of important factors). In addition, both the sketch map and the causal map data indicated that location explained some of the variation among farmers. The sheep/beef results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, on- and off-farm relationships, production system management and responses to innovation and risk. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Integrated farmers were more similar to the Organic than the Conventional ones. Finally, the report interprets the findings in terms of their potential to differentiate the panels on the basis of social dimensions. While the literature shows at least 15 potential bases for social differentiation between panels, our results support 12 of these. Of these there is six (community; grower networks; craft orientation; sense of place; grower stress and wellbeing; identity) for which there evidence for subtle to moderate differentiation while the remaining six (commercial and economic orientation; learning and expertise; symbolic ‘look’ of the farmscape; indicators of on-farm processes; positioning towards nature/environment; farm management approaches) provide a stronger base for differentiation among panels. In its conclusion, the report identifies key indicated themes that have potential for transdisciplinary discussion, including: audit and market access, resilience, and intensification.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Midcentral (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Bay of Plenty (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Lakes DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Northland (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Otago (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Taranaki (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Auckland (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that they can access the resources they require to ensure their long term health and wellbeing.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Canterbury (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Waitemata DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Whanganui DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Wairarapa (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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