226 results for Report, Lincoln University Research Archive

  • The Nature of Wellbeing: How nature’s ecosystem services contribute to the wellbeing of New Zealand and New Zealanders

    Roberts, L.; Brower, A.; Kerr, G.; Lambert, S. J.; McWilliam, W.; Moore, K.; Quinn, J.; Simmons, D.; Thrush, S.; Townsend, M.; Blaschke; Costanza, R.; Cullen, R.; Hughey, K.; Wratten, S.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    What do we need for a ‘good life’? At one level, the answer to this question will differ for each person. Yet at a deeper level, we all share a common set of fundamental needs that must be met for us to experience wellbeing. Understanding those needs and the crucial contribution of nature’s services in enabling us to meet them is the subject of this report. The report brings together research on wellbeing and research on ecosystem services, focusing principally on the services that come from indigenous ecosystems in New Zealand. There has been a massive upsurge in research on ecosystem services in the last 20 years, including much detailed research and discussion about how to classify and categorise the types of ecosystem services that contribute to wellbeing, and numerous studies attempting to determine the monetary value of various ecosystem services. However, the question of how to categorise and understand the types or aspects of wellbeing that ecosystem services may contribute to has not been explored to anywhere near the same extent. This may be a reflection of the fact that much of the impetus for studying ecosystem services has come from ecologists and economists, rather than from social scientists who are more familiar with the rapidly expanding wellbeing literature. To date, much of the work of ecologists has focused on the supply of ecosystem services, while that of economists has focused on the demands for ecosystem services, both marketed and non-marketed. However, there has been little focus on what is driving our demand for ecosystem services—a desire for enhanced wellbeing.

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  • Information on water allocation in New Zealand

    Lincoln Environmental

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Prepared for Ministry for the Environment (Report No 4375/1, April 2000).

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  • Results of the Westland petrel satellite tracking programme 1995 season

    Freeman Amanda, N. D.; Wilson Kerry Jayne

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Three male Westland petrels, Procellaria westlandica, with chicks were tracked by satellite between 11 August and 19 September 1995. The flights are illustrated in the accompanying maps. The results show the importance of the continental slope to breeding Westland petrels. They also show that a breeding bird can complete a long distance flight ranging up to 800km from the colony. Although the tracked birds did spend some time in the vicinity of hoki trawlers, they also foraged over a far greater area than that worked by the fishing fleet.

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  • Morepork (Ninox novaseelandiae) distribution and conservation on Banks Peninsula

    Pohnke, C.; Evans, A.; Bowie, M. H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The morepork (Ninox novaeseelandiae) project on Banks Peninsula was initiated in July 2014 and is expected to continue until 2017. The aim of this project led by the Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust (BPCT) is broadly to identify the habitats occupied by morepork and based on those findings, improve predator control in targeted areas as well as prohibiting the use of toxins. This work will contribute to improving the breeding and survival success of morepork and therefore increase their abundance in a fragmented and modified habitat on Banks Peninsula.This project successfully combined the use of several data collection methods to create a comprehensive spatial distribution map. Morepork appear to be wide-spread, but patchily distributed across the peninsula, and the number of individuals may still be relatively small. Additional research is required to detect their presence in more remote locations. The morepork monitored in Kaituna Reserve were foraging outside of the reserve, which suggests that small remnants are not sufficient to maintain a breeding pair. These birds did not successfully breed despite the presence of fertile eggs. Defining suitable morepork habitat may not mainly depend on the presence of predators and food sources (small rodents). Additional research is required to identify what characteristics determine the quality of a morepork habitat. The use of nesting boxes, as well as predator control may increase their survival rate.

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  • Jet boating on Canterbury Rivers - 2015

    Greenaway, R.; Gerard, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    All jetboating rivers in Canterbury are described in terms of their values, flow needs and other considerations. Access, flow restrictions, and seasonal limits are identified and the top boating opportunities are highlighted. The rivers are dealt with geographically and reported on by section according to the findings of the River Values Assessment System which was the base research undertaken.

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  • Assessment of effects of different flow regime scenarios on native riverbed nesting birds of the Hurunui and Waiau rivers

    Hughey, K.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The scope of this report relates to an evaluation of different flow regime management scenarios for both the Waiau and Hurunui rivers with regard to their potential effects on native riverbed nesting birds.

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  • Food miles - comparative energy / emissions performance of New Zealand's agriculture industry

    Saunders, C.; Barber, A.; Taylor, G.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Food miles measures the distance food travels from producer to consumer. Food that has travelled long distances is perceived as being harmful to the environment and has some media attention in New Zealands's key markets, especially in Europe. However, this report argues that it is not the distance that should be assessed but the total energy used, production to plate including transport. The results of this analysis show that New Zealand products compare favourably with lower energy and emissions per tonne of product delivered to the UK compared to other UK sources. In the case of dairy New Zealand is at least twice as efficient; and for sheep meat four times as efficient.

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  • Environmental indicators for the sustainable management of freshwater

    Ward Jonet, C.; Pyle Eric

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The Ministry for the Environment is developing a core set of nationally standardised environmental indicators that will help to assess the state of the environment and help to monitor the effectiveness and suitability of regional and national environmental policy and legislation. The purpose of this report is to suggest an approach to and some examples of indicators for the sustainable management of freshwater. In this report, the emphasis is on indicators of life supporting capacity/ecosystem health because the indicators of human uses and values are relatively well established. It is recognised that indicators of ecosystem health will overlap with other groups of indicators to be developed later as part of the Ministry for the Environment's indicator programme. Management objectives of the agencies responsible for monitoring may vary with the site to be monitored and the region. Therefore the indicators selected for monitoring will be influenced by particular waterbody and the objectives for management.

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  • Uptake of 1080 by watercress and puha – culturally important plants used for food

    Ogilvie, S.; Miller, A.; Ataria, J.; Waiwai, J.; Doherty, J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This research was aimed at examining the uptake and persistence of 1080 in two plants of cultural importance, puha, (Sonchus spp.) and watercress (Nasturtium microphyllum/officinale). The work was carried out between September 2007 and March 2009.

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  • A re-evaluation of potential rodenticides for aerial control of rodents

    Eason, C.; Ogilvie, S.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Rodent control is carried out extensively in New Zealand to protect the native fauna and flora. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of different rodenticides as alternatives to sodium fluoroacetate (1080), and their suitability for aerial application. It includes existing rodenticides and those in the registration ‘pipeline’, as well as those that are not currently available in New Zealand. In the short to medium term, the focus for aerial baits should be on those compounds already registered in New Zealand or other countries. Aerial brodifacoum baiting is appropriate in isolated situations, but is not suitable for repeated use on the mainland, as brodifacoum is highly persistent and will bioaccumulate. Diphacinone has been registered for field use in New Zealand and the US Environmental Protection Agency has recently registered it for aerial control of rodents for conservation purposes; therefore, this is a logical first choice for control in New Zealand. Cholecalciferol is the next best option, as there is no secondary poisoning and thus there would be lower risk to non-target bird species; this is currently registered for field use as a rodenticide in bait stations. The third option is cholecalciferol in combination with coumatetralyl, which should be more effective than cholecalciferol alone, and the fourth is zinc phosphide. In the longer term, the preferred alternative to 1080 would be a novel, humane red blood cell toxin, related to para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP). PAPP is an attractive new pesticide that is being developed for stoat (Mustela erminea) and feral cat (Felis catus) control; however, the rodenticidal potential of this class of compounds still remains to be determined. Availability and registration status could influence this priority list in the future. A strategy to manage mice (Mus musculus) and sustain rat (Rattus spp.) control needs to be flexible and integrate non-anticoagulant and anticoagulant use.

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  • Assessing the palatability of threatened plant species to possums

    Hickling Graham, J.; Mallinson, F. J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The introduction of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) into a country previously without arboreal mammals has had a pervasive impact on New Zealand's indigenous ecosystems (Green 1984). Possums selectively browse palatable plant species, eliminating some while favouring those that are unpalatable. This results in a progressive change in the species composition of browsed vegetation associations. Measuring diet preferences of free-ranging animals is fraught with problems (Norbury & Sanson 1992), especially when the species concerned are rare or threatened. However, it is particularly important to establish the palatability of such species to possums, as this will help direct their future conservation management. In this report, we propose a method for assessing the palatability of selected threatened plant species using captive possums.

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  • The conservation status of invertebrates in Canterbury

    Pawson Stephen, M.; Emberson Rowan, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report uses a species-based approach to identify invertebrates that are threatened / endangered, and, in some cases, needing short- or long-term management to ensure their survival. The aims of this project were to: Collate available information on threatened invertebrates in Canterbury (including that from Molloy & Davies (1992) and Patrick & Dugdale (2000)); Raise awareness of groups of invertebrates previously not considered and provide a revised list of species considered to be threatened; Provide some measure of the conservation status of these threatened species and thus set priorities for action; Provide location, biology, taxonomic and ecological information, where available, and highlight areas where further research is necessary. Unfortunately some groups, for example nematodes and terrestrial gastropods, have been excluded due to resource constraints, or a complete lack of information when compiling the list.

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  • Complementary pathways to sustainability

    Hunt, L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • Diurnal variation in Te Waihora water quality

    Fisher, Kelly

    Report
    Lincoln University

    WCFM Summer Scholarship Report 2011-02, Prepared for Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management(WCFM), University of Canterbury & Lincoln University.

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  • Visitors to Christchurch : characteristics and decision-making

    Moore, K.; Simmons, D.; Fairweather, J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the results from a survey of visitors to Christchurch, New Zealand which investigated visitors' general characteristics (e.g., age, gender, origin country, group type, etc.), prior knowledge of Christchurch and perceived information needs, recommendations and decision-making processes (e.g., timing of itinerary planning, perceived influences on decisions). A selective review of the literature on visitor decision-making is presented which emphasizes the various processes involved and the role of information. It also explores the affective and family contexts of visitor decision-making. An alternative understanding of decision-making is presented based upon discursive psychological approaches that emphasise the discursive work carried out by visitors' discourse about information and their decision-making. This approach helps to highlight the role that information-gathering activities have in the visitor experience and the interactions visitors have with information sources.

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  • Creating and publicising a web-based database of 1080 and taonga species information: final report

    Ataria, J. M.; Waiwai, J.; Doherty, J.; Ogilvie Shaun, C.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The research was aimed at producing a web-based database of information on 1080 impacts on non-target species, identified as important by Maori. The research reported here was carried out between August 2006 and June 2007, and was undertaken by a collaborative team of researchers from Lincoln University, Landcare Research Ltd, Lake Waikaremoana Hapu Restoration Trust, and Tuhoe Tuawhenua Trust.

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  • Community perceptions of tourism in Christchurch and Akaroa

    Shone, M.; Simmons, D.; Fairweather, J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This study reports on community response to tourism in the urban centres of Christchurch and Akaroa (Canterbury, New Zealand). Specifically, it examines residents' perceptions, expectations and adaptations to tourism at the local level and thus represents a host community perspective on the phenomena of tourism in the Canterbury region. This report is the fourth of four case studies in New Zealand visitor destinations that are aimed at understanding the way in which host communities influence tourism and, conversely, the ways in which tourism influences them. The three previous community case studies undertaken as part of the wider research programme include Kaikoura (1998), Rotorua (2000) and Westland (2001). Taken together, the potential impact of visitors on host destinations and communities has seen growing attention given to the issue of sustainability in tourism development. Central to this notion of sustainability is the recognition that tourism has both positive and negative impacts on host destinations. Good management of this growing industry therefore requires us to understand how tourism development occurs at the local level, as well as how different communities adapt to that development. Increasing our understanding of these processes is vital to the sustainability of the industry, and is a crucial component of the strategies that local communities need to develop in order to reap the benefits that they seek from tourism.

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  • Bay of Plenty surf break study

    Peryman, P. Bailey

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Prepared by Bailey Peryman, with assistance from Bay of Plenty Regional Council.

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  • Status and conservation of the sooty shearwater colony at Mt Oneone, Wanganui River, Westland

    Wilson Kerry Jayne

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The sooty shearwater colony at Mt Oneone (also known as the Doughboy) at the mouth of the Wanganui River is one of few mainland sooty shearwater colonies remaining in Westland (Hamilton et al. 1997). The Wanganui River Walkway provides access to a viewing platform on top of Mt Oneone (65 m) and the shearwater colony is beneath this platform. In this study we set out to determine the status of, and breeding success at, the Mt Oneone colony.

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  • A survey of community attitudes to Akaroa hosting cruise ship arrivals

    Wilson, J.; Shone, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Since the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquakes, Akaroa has been hosting the majority of cruise ship arrivals to Canterbury. This amounts to approximately 70-74 days per season, when between 2,000- 4,000 persons come ashore between 9am and 4pm when in port. This increased level of cruise ship arrivals has had significant impacts, both beneficial and detrimental, on Akaroa. Attitudes within the Akaroa community to hosting cruise ship arrivals appear to be divided, and has led to public debate in Akaroa about the issue. In response to this situation, Christchurch and Canterbury Tourism (CCT) commissioned this research project to assess the impact of cruise ship tourism on the Akaroa community.

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