19 results for Report, Massey Research Online

  • The Impact of Person-Directed Care at Metlifecare - Application of the Eden Alternative. The Final Report - August 2016

    Yeung, PHY; Dale, M; Rodgers, V; O'Donoghue, K (2016-09-13)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Non-Government Organisations (NGO) Study Awards – Exploring the Impact on Social Work Students and Social Service Organisations

    Yeung, PHY; Mooney, H; English, A (2016-09-16)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • The sustainable delivery of sexual violence prevention education in schools

    Julich, SJ; Oak, E; Terrell, J; Good, G (2015)

    Report
    Massey University

    Sexual violence is a crime that cannot be ignored: it causes our communities significant consequences including heavy economic costs, and evidence of its effects can be seen in our criminal justice system, public health system, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), and education system, particularly in our schools. Many agencies throughout New Zealand work to end sexual violence. Auckland-based Rape Prevention Education: Whakatu Mauri (RPE) is one such agency, and is committed to preventing sexual violence by providing a range of programmes and initiatives, information, education, and advocacy to a broad range of audiences. Up until early 2014 RPE employed one or two full-time positions dedicated to co-ordinating and training a large pool (up to 15) of educators on casual contracts to deliver their main school-based programmes, BodySafe – approximately 450 modules per year, delivered to some 20 high schools. Each year several of the contract educators, many of whom were tertiary students, found secure full time employment elsewhere. To retain sufficient contract educators to deliver its BodySafe contract meant that RPE had to recruit, induct and train new educators two to three times every year. This model was expensive, resource intense, and ultimately untenable. The Executive Director and core staff at RPE wanted to develop a more efficient and stable model of delivery that fitted its scarce resources. To enable RPE to know what the most efficient model was nationally and internationally, with Ministry of Justice funding, RPE commissioned Massey University to undertake this report reviewing national and international research on sexual violence prevention education (SVPE). [Background from Executive Summary.]

    View record details
  • Report on the 2010/2011 West Bengal Anglo-Indian Survey: ‘Anglo-Indian Count’

    Andrews, RA (2015-08-31)

    Report
    Massey University

    In December 2010 and the first few months of 2011 a survey was conducted in West Bengal which collected demographic information on the Anglo-Indian community. This report describes the methods used and presents selected findings under the headings: educational levels, housing, amenities, card-holding, employment, income, languages spoken, and religion.

    View record details
  • Barriers to Active Transport in Palmerston North

    Cheyne, CM; Muhammad, I; Scott, M; Tien, C

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Active music

    Rickson, Daphne; Evans, Axel; Claydon, Natasha Ratitihuia; Dennis, Patrice; Dovey, Kate; Francis, Tess Kiernan; Pollock, Janiece; Sos, Shafiq; Erin, Upjohn-Beatson; Williams, Kwame; Dombroski, Jacob; McMahon, Sarah; Haanen, Tessa; Watkins, Edward (2014)

    Report
    Massey University

    We are a group of eleven young people with intellectual disability and three music therapists. We did action research at a university. We wanted to find out how a music group might be helpful for young people with intellectual disabilities. We wanted to tell our own story and use our own words because we have a lot to say. We wanted people to read our story and to use our ideas to help young people with intellectual disabilities to have good lives. We went to twenty sessions of music research, and five more sessions of research analysis. We also did a lot of research work in between sessions. We found out that music groups can be fun. They can also be hard work. They help us develop skills like listening and waiting. They are places where we can be independent. But music groups are also good places to practice working as a team. They can be safe places for people to express emotions. Music helps us to know people. It brings us together. Playing musical instruments can also help physical development. A good life for us would include having the chance to play music with others or to have music lessons. But it is not always easy for us to go to ordinary lessons or music groups. It might be important for young people with intellectual disability to have support from people who understand them at first. We want to be independent but we need help to develop our dreams in practical ways. We found that doing research is fun and interesting. We were all researchers but we had different things to do. The adults had to be the organisers, setting up the research. We knew from the start the research would be about what young people think about music. The adults had done their reading and had written the literature review. The young people decided on other questions, and gathered data in lots of different ways. They also did some of the analysis, and decided on the findings of each cycle. The findings of each cycle, with more of the young people’s words, are in the appendices. Later, the adults wrote the main findings, the discussion and conclusion. We all discussed the things we wrote along the way and at the end of the research. The adults have tried to help the young people understand what has been written. The research took a lot of time and it was hard work for everybody. To be a good researcher you need to learn research skills. It is important that young people with intellectual disabilities are not exhausted by research. They need to be able to enjoy the things they are doing. We all liked being involved in research even though it was hard work. We think that research is important and helpful. Young people should be involved in research that is about them. We learnt that young people with intellectual disabilities can go to university. Going to university was scary at first but we got used to it and we started to enjoy it. We need to do more research to make sure universities are ready to welcome students with intellectual disabilities. We can use our research to show universities that it can be a good idea to support people with intellectual disabilities to go to university. We can also use our research show people what we can do; what we like to do; and what we want to do in the future. Most of us would like to do more music and research in future.

    View record details
  • Creating Engineers - Climbing the Educational Stair-case

    Frater, TG; Grigg, NP

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Papua New Guinea National Human Development Report

    Banks, GA

    Report
    Massey University

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) stands at a critical moment in its development. With Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth of over 20 per cent expected for 2015, following the start of production from the massive PNG Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) project, the country has a unique opportunity to leverage significant sustainable and equitable improvements in levels of health, education, income and other elements of inclusive human development. At the same time, the country also faces considerable risks. If poor choices are made, the impact of the high growth rates will be limited, even detrimental to the development prospects of Papua New Guineans and the nation and the lives of people living in poverty. This report aims to provide information and national as well as international case study experiences to assist decision-making in the country. The report has four purposes: (1) Review the extent to which Papua New Guinea’s revenues from extractive industries have led to practical human development outcomes; (2) Reveal lessons from other countries that can be useful for Papua New Guinea; (3) Highlight some specific innovations from Papua New Guinea’s experience that can contribute to development in other countries; and (4) Stimulate, inform and shift the debate in the country to enable leaders to make appropriate choices for the wellbeing of citizens. Papua New Guinea’s 40 year history of Independence has been dominated by the extractives sector. Large-scale mine and oil production (worth at least K150billion since Independence) has driven formal sector growth, underpinned budgets that have improved health and education outcomes, as well as provided significant improvements in incomes and livelihoods for some. At the same time however, this production has sparked civil strife, caused massive environmental damage, arguably distorted the economy, and brought about a range of negative impacts on communities. Valuable lessons are being learnt (and have potential international relevance), but still the risk remains that the existing model of economic growth in the country will not deliver sustained improvements in wellbeing for the majority of the population. The report reviews the state of human development in Papua New Guinea in terms of the three pillars of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental – and specifically examines the ways in which the extractive industries have contributed – positively and negatively – to these related but distinct pillars. While there have been some measurable achievements in terms of improvements in human development (increases in life expectancy, per capita income and educational achievement), many of the indicators are less positive. Despite 14 consecutive years of economic growth, there has been little change in poverty levels in the country. In fact the level of inequality in the country has increased. There is much that is positive about the contribution of the extractives sector to Papua New Guinea’s development, including significant revenue flows to government, cutting edge innovations to enhance revenue and transparency at the national level, as well as the involvement of some communities in some operational decision-making. There remains however, considerable scope for improvement. Other positive impacts include recent initiatives addressing service delivery, governance, and policy direction that provide useful guides to future action. The report reviews the significant amount of national and international experience and recent policy development throughout the extractives sector, much of which has been driven by the realization that mineral and oil wealth has not always been a positive force for a country’s national development. The term ‘resource curse’ captures the international view that growth based on a dominant extractives sector can, if not managed well, lead to a range of negative effects, including stunted economic growth, corruption, weak institutions, conflict, human rights abuses, and poor human development outcomes. There is also, however, experience that suggests the ‘resource curse’ is not inevitable: that there are particular political, institutional and economic mechanisms that can be used to better connect resource wealth with sustainable human development. Papua New Guinea is on the frontline of innovation in some of these areas, and valuable lessons can inform international best practice and decision-making. Based on a review of the state of human development and the experience of the extractives sector in Papua New Guinea, along with case studies and lessons from the national and international experience, the report presents a range of policy options – framed around a United Nations Development Program’s Strategy on Extractive Industries and Human Development. This aims to assist in better translating minerals and oil revenues into more sustainable and inclusive forms of human development. For this to happen, countries should seek to capture as much of the resource revenue as possible through transparent and accountable systems - without losing the foreign investment - and use this to boost human development through effective service delivery to the largely rural-based population, while working to reduce the negative social, economic and environmental impacts. Policy options to do this include ways of making policy frameworks and operation-specific negotiations more effective and more inclusive, refinements in institutional governance and service delivery, improvements to transparency and management of revenue flows (though mechanisms such as the Sovereign Wealth Fund and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative), the establishment of a formal sector-specific grievance mechanism, a focus on building economic diversification into non-extractive sectors (especially agriculture and tourism), novel environmental management approaches, better integration of corporate community development contributions, and improvements in data collection and management processes. Taken singularly, or preferably as a whole, these options provide the basis for enhancing the contribution of the sector to sustainable human development. They are offered as a basis for public and policy dialogue and debate, which should then form the basis for action. The report recognises that it is only the timely actions of stakeholders in the country – governments, leaders, politicians, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), development partners, citizens and the private sector – that will make a practical and real difference to human development outcomes in Papua New Guinea. Papua New Guinea has a unique window of opportunity to make some of these decisions now. The country needs to grasp this opportunity.

    View record details
  • An Evaluation of Clinical Supervision of Allied Health Professionals from Two District Health Boards: A preliminary summary report

    O'Donoghue, KB (2016-03-31)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Global Media Monitoring Project National Report: New Zealand

    Fountaine, SL

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Sustaining lean manufacturing in New Zealand organisations

    Goodyer, J; Grigg, N; Murti, Y (2011)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • UK Degree Apprenticeships a Year in Review

    Goodyer, JE

    Report
    Massey University

    This report summarises the first year operation of the digital & technology solutions degree apprenticeship at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) in the UK. It focuses on MMU's progress and their SME engagement. This report provides valuable insights, adding detail and depth, to the understanding of the early stages of the Trailblazer journey.

    View record details
  • Stepping into one another's world: Apprenticeships - Transforming Engineering Technologist Education in New Zealand

    Goodyer, JE; Frater, TG (2015-06-30)

    Report
    Massey University

    The authors have been contracted to advise the Tertiary Education Commission on the viability of apprenticeship models to educate degree level engineering technologists. We have conducted a literature review of learning models that have high levels of employer involvement, supplemented by interviews with tertiary providers involved in delivering new degree apprenticeships. We have found that there has been a resurgence of apprenticeships as a model for delivering higher education. The challenges of the future require engineering graduates to be more rounded individuals than those educated through traditional means. Apprenticeships deliver this more rounded engineer. Two key findings are the need for effective collaboration between employers and educationalists at the design and planning stage, and clear pathways to higher levels of education. Employers have to be in the driving seat, specifying degree standards that are outcome-based and occupation-driven. We have endorsed apprenticeships as a viable learning model for educating engineering technologists and have provided recommendations for establishing new degrees based on an apprenticeship learning model.

    View record details
  • Māori farming trusts - A preliminary scoping investigation into the governance and management of large dairy farm businesses.

    Phillips, Tom; Woods, Christine; Lythberg, Billie (2014)

    Report
    Massey University

    This preliminary scoping study investigates areas for possible improvement in the governance and management of large Māori dairy farm businesses. Building on the innovative practices of their tūpuna – including Rawiri Taiwhanga, the country’s first commercial dairy farmer – Māori are defining their own aspirations, realities and goals in the dairy farming world (Durie 1998, 2000). This report outlines these, and their accompanying challenges, as expressed by individuals and collectives currently engaged in Māori Dairy farm businesses. The Māori way of doing business is described in this study as having a ‘Quadruple Bottom Line of Profit, People, Environment and Community’ business objectives. More specifically, ‘Māori farms often have an inverted Quadruple Bottom Line. People, Environment and their Community often come before Profit….but without Profit none of it happens.’ Māori strategic plans and business values place emphasis on relationships, responsibilities, reciprocity and respect. These are exemplars of a Māori world-view, which explicitly acknowledges particular historic and cultural contexts (Tapsell and Woods 2010). The strategic management plans of the Māori Farming Trusts illustrate the spiral or matrix of values ‘He korunga o nga tikanga’ envisaged by Nicholson, Hēnare and Woods (2012). They prioritise the development of social capital to create competitive advantage. Such strategic plans reflect Māori vision and aspirations. These are to sustain and grow the land base; to provide leadership and guidance for the whānau; to develop capacity and resources within the Trusts and to perform better as businesses.

    View record details
  • Smaller scale New Zealand dairy farmers: long term plans and key challenges

    Westbrooke, Victoria; Nuthall, Peter; Phillips, Tom (2016)

    Report
    Massey University

    Farmer wellbeing has been defined as “a dynamic process that gives people a sense of how their lives are evolving” (Nimpagariste & Culver, 2010). In order to support and enhance the wellbeing of farmers in New Zealand, the farmers’ goals, future plans and challenges to their plans all need to be understood. A particular group of interest is smaller scale dairy farmers. The average size of dairy farms in developed agricultural nations is increasing and New Zealand is no different. A high proportion (62%) of NZ dairy herds are smaller scale, milking less than 400 cows at peak. Their wellbeing, now and in the future, is important to the New Zealand dairy industry as a whole. Consequently, the aim of this study is to develop an understanding of smaller-scale dairy farmers’ future goals, plans and challenges so that recommendations can be made to enhance and support their wellbeing in the future. Farms who peak milked less than 400 cows were surveyed via telephone. A total of 346 surveys were completed, in Taranaki (n=103), the Waikato (n=144) and Northland (n=99). The majority of respondents’ were owner-operators (75%), male (67%), born and bred in a rural area (79%), and between 40 and 60 years old (57%). Overall, the mean farm size was 97ha, with 240 cows producing 86,789kgMS with 0.83 of a full time employee. Respondents’ had high (67%) equity levels in their businesses and a third (35%) had non-farming investments. Farmers’ most likely future investments were related to their current farming business, that is reducing debt to very low levels and increasing production by more than 10%. Based on farmers future plans and challenges reported and discussed in this study, it is clear the smaller scale dairy farmers would like knowledge and assistance in five key areas; succession, regulation and compliance, staff, technology and cash-flow/profitability. This report concludes with suggestions for each of these areas, which has the potential to maintain or increase the wellbeing of smaller scale dairy farmers in New Zealand. [Executive summary]

    View record details
  • Self-assessment in tertiary education. Final research report to Ako Aotearoa

    Bourke, R; Tait, C (2012)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • It's My Life: Evaluation Report

    Tilley, EN; Page, W; Balasubramanian, R; O'Meara, R; Gee, S; Hazou, R; Galloway, C; Waterworth, C; Brown, A; Steelsmith, M; Sligo, F; Kingi, TK; Jones, L; Page, R; Love, TR; Soma, J (2014-11-28)

    Report
    Massey University

    This report presents a snapshot of some outcomes from the by-youth for-youth It's My Life youth smokefree research project, which was funded by the Pathway to Smokefree New Zealand 2025 Innovation Fund. The report includes quantitative data from the It’s My Life pre and post evaluation surveys, campus cessation reporting, and social media analytics, plus qualitative data from youth participants in the project. Two key results from the Massey University surveys are that over the It’s My Life campaign timeframe, smokers’ desire to quit increased and tolerance of the tobacco industry, in general but also particularly among smokers, reduced. We interpret these results as an endorsement of the decision by the young people who designed the campaign not to vilify smokers but to use positive empowerment themes to make smokers feel supported and encouraged to take back control of their lives from tobacco companies.

    View record details
  • The Cookbook: A discussion on the process, pitfalls and successes of hacking an open textbook

    Pearson, EE

    Report
    Massey University

    This report represents the process and reflections on the creation and curation of an open source 'texthack' for a media studies textbook for students in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific. This document is provided as a resource for anyone contemplating a similar texthack project. Suggestions on processes and issues for consideration are presented along with information about success and difficulties of this specific project.

    View record details
  • National Health Emergency Plan: A framework for the health and disability sector

    Johal, SS; MacDonald, C; Mitchell, J (2015-10-15)

    Report
    Massey University

    This edition of the National Health Emergency Plan has been revised and updated to reflect current thinking on the health aspects of emergency management in New Zealand and internationally. It reflects the sophistication of a second-generation, risk-based plan developed by emergency management specialists under the leadership of the Joint Centre for Disaster Research in partnership with the Ministry of Health. The plan was developed in consultation with local and international specialists in the field of emergency management, emergency managers and planners in the health and disability sector, and other key stakeholders. A collaborative, consultative approach has been taken throughout the development of the plan, including holding workshops with health emergency management stakeholders across the nation. Constant contact has been maintained with the concurrent review of the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015 (National CDEM Plan) to ensure consistency between the two plans. In acknowledgement of the importance of evidence-based policy and practice, an extensive international literature review formed the basis for much of the plan’s content. To maintain its alignment with the National CDEM Plan, the National Health Emergency Plan will be reviewed by the Ministry of Health within five years of its adoption. The plan will also be reviewed and updated as required following any new developments or substantial changes to the operations or organisation of New Zealand health and disability services, as a result of lessons from a significant emergency affecting the health of communities or the health and disability sector itself, if new hazards and risks are identified, or by direction of the Minister of Health or Director-General of Health. Annexes at the back of the plan are intended to provide a short document format that can be rapidly updated with new or revised guidance on specific issues as they are identified. The Ministry of Health welcomes submissions of good practice that can be incorporated into future editions.

    View record details