278 results for Report, ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • Issues facing Southland’s wetlands - recommendations for future management

    Campbell, David I.; Clarkson, Beverley R.; Clarkson, Bruce D.

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this report we provide an overview of the issues facing Southland’s wetlands as we perceive them and record our recommendations for future management

    View record details
  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

    View record details
  • E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū: Indigenous methods of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Scofield, Paul; Raharuhi, Urukeiha; Green, Lynda; Matamua, Rangi; Temara, Pou; Roa, Tom (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Naming in Māori society is a relationship of mana. It is a relationship formulated on establishing and reinforcing connections, identity, and place through whakapapa, between the person or group doing the naming and the thing being named. Māori have always named our world and therefore our realities. The overall goal of this Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga-funded extension of excellence project was to research and investigate indigenous methodologies of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa and to develop a naming protocol for the naming of birds in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In addition to semi-structured interviews and a wānanga, reviews of scientific, archival and oral Māori resources, were undertaken.

    View record details
  • The built environment, Hamilton City Council policies and child driveway safety: a balancing act

    Madley, Brendan; Campbell, Maxine M. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Driveway run-overs continue to bring tragedy to New Zealand families at a higher rate than any other Western nation. Meanwhile, little progress appears to have been made in regard to the recommendations of previous research. This project investigates whether recommendations in regard to one key factor in driveway run-overs, the built environment, are reflected in current local body policies and regulations. The research evaluates Hamilton City Council policies affecting the renovation and/or erection of domestic residences with a view to determining whether they are consistent with existing knowledge and best practice initiatives designed to minimise accidental injuries to children on driveways. The project compares the findings of a review of the existing literature on child safety best practice for the built environment and urban design of driveways, with a review of Hamilton City Council policies and guidelines relating to the built environment of residential properties and adjacent roads (the Operative District Plan, Ten Year Plan, Urban Growth Strategy, Vista, and more), along with relevant central government policy. These findings are triangulated with data from interviews with four expert informants – one child safety expert and three Hamilton City Council employees involved in planning, policy and transport – who provide insights into the translation of policies into practice.

    View record details
  • An evaluation of Te Rau Puawai workforce 100: Evaluation overview

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Levy, Michelle Patricia; Henry, Jacqueline; Whangapirita, Laura (2002-05-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In July 2001, the Maori & Psychology Research Unit of the University of Waikato was asked to conduct an evaluation of the Te Rau Puawai programme, a joint venture between the former Health Funding Authority and Massey University. The overall goal of the programme is to contribute at least 100 Maori graduates to the Maori mental health workforce within a five year period. The overall aim of the evaluation was to provide the Ministry of Health with a clearer understanding of the programme including: the perceived critical success factors, the barriers if any regarding Te Rau Puawai, the impact of the programme, the extent to which the programme may be transferable, gaps in the programme, and suggested improvements. Through archival search, questionnaire surveys and interviews, evaluative data was collected from major stakeholders in the Te Rau Puawai programme.

    View record details
  • Abundance of mysid shrimp (Tenagomysis chiltoni) in shallow lakes in the Waikato region and implications for fish diet

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hicks, Brendan J.; Powrie, Warrick (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Tenagomysis chiltoni, a species of mysid shrimp, is widely distributed amongst the riverine lakes of the lower Waikato basin. They appear to thrive in turbid waters, with the greatest abundances found in lakes such as Waahi and Waikare, which have low Secchi transparencies and sparse aquatic macrophyte communities representing remnants of formerly dense beds (Kirk, 1983; Chapman el al., 1991). Maximum mysid abundances of 2,868 and 857 individuals m⁻² in Lake Waahi and Waikare respectively were recorded by Chapman et al. (1991) in March-April 1987. Anecdotal evidence suggests that mysid abundance in Lake Waikare is markedly reduced since the late 1980s (Gary Watson, Te Kauwhata, pers. comm.) with the arrival and proliferation of koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) presumed to be the cause. Koi carp arrived in Lake Waikare after 1987 and by 2007 it was estimated that over 80% of the fish biomass present in Lake Waikare was comprised of koi carp (Hicks, 2007). Sable isotope studies on carp (Matsuzaki et al., 2007) have shown that mysid shrimp can form a significant component of their diet. This suggests that mysid shrimp may be predated on by koi carp in the Waikato which has implications on mysid shrimp abundance as well as the abundance of native fish species which rely on mysid shrimp as a food source (Champman et al., 1991). The objective of this study was to measure mysid abundance in three shallow, turbid lakes in the lower Waikato basin (Lake Waikare, Whangape and Waahi) to compare with previous abundance estimates made in the late 1980s. A second objective was to determine whether mysid shrimp form a significant component of the diet of koi carp in the study sites by examining their stable isotope signatures.

    View record details
  • Monitoring first year Maori students enrolled in selected Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses: A report prepared for the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

    Levy, Michelle Patricia; Williams, Margaret H. (2003-03-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Monitoring first year Maori Students Enrolled in Selected Faculty of Arts andSocial Sciences Courses. The total number of Maori students targeted by this project was 182, representing 93% of the total number of Maori students enrolled in Semester B level one courses. The majority of students participating in this initiative were first year students, although a small number of students taking 100 level courses were second, third or graduate year students. 11 Student views on the monitoring and support initiative Students were provided with the opportunity to comment on the monitoring and support initiative. All students contacted (49) recommended that this intervention continue for future first year Maori students enrolled in FASS.

    View record details
  • Bay of Plenty Region and its Territorial Authorities: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana; Pawar, Shefali (2013-12)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Bay of Plenty Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

    View record details
  • Science in the New Zealand Curriculum e-in-science

    Buntting, Catherine Michelle; MacIntyre, Bill; Falloon, Garry; Cosslett, Graeme; Forret, Michael (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This milestone report explores some innovative possibilities for e-in-science practice to enhance teacher capability and increase student engagement and achievement. In particular, this report gives insights into how e-learning might be harnessed to help create a future-oriented science education programme. “Innovative” practices are considered to be those that integrate (or could integrate) digital technologies in science education in ways that are not yet commonplace. “Future-oriented education” refers to the type of education that students in the “knowledge age” are going to need. While it is not yet clear exactly what this type of education might look like, it is clear that it will be different from the current system. One framework used to differentiate between these kinds of education is the evolution of education from Education 1.0 to Education 2.0 and 3.0 (Keats & Schmidt, 2007). Education 1.0, like Web 1.0, is considered to be largely a one-way process. Students “get” knowledge from their teachers or other information sources. Education 2.0, as defined by Keats and Schmidt, happens when Web 2.0 technologies are used to enhance traditional approaches to education. New interactive media, such as blogs, social bookmarking, etc. are used, but the process of education itself does not differ significantly from Education 1.0. Education 3.0, by contrast, is characterised by rich, cross-institutional, cross-cultural educational opportunities. The learners themselves play a key role as creators of knowledge artefacts, and distinctions between artefacts, people and processes become blurred, as do distinctions of space and time. Across these three “generations”, the teacher’s role changes from one of knowledge source (Education 1.0) to guide and knowledge source (Education 2.0) to orchestrator of collaborative knowledge creation (Education 3.0). The nature of the learner’s participation in the learning also changes from being largely passive to becoming increasingly active: the learner co-creates resources and opportunities and has a strong sense of ownership of his or her own education. In addition, the participation by communities outside the traditional education system increases. Building from this framework, we offer our own “framework for future-oriented science education” (see Figure 1). In this framework, we present two continua: one reflects the nature of student participation (from minimal to transformative) and the other reflects the nature of community participation (also from minimal to transformative). Both continua stretch from minimal to transformative participation. Minimal participation reflects little or no input by the student/community into the direction of the learning—what is learned, how it is learned and how what is learned will be assessed. Transformative participation, in contrast, represents education where the student or community drives the direction of the learning, including making decisions about content, learning approaches and assessment.

    View record details
  • Nutrient budget and water balance for Lake Ngaroto

    Beaton, Rowena; Hamilton, David P.; Brokbartold, Marcel; Brakel, Christoph; Özkundakci, Deniz (2007-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The objectives of the present study were to provide an indication of tributary nutrient and sediment levels, and the lake water quality for Lake Ngaroto over a period of summer sampling from December 2006 to February 2007. The measurements were designed to provide a foundation for a comprehensive water balance and nutrient load assessment for the lake in a future study, and to ultimately support informed decision making related to lake management.

    View record details
  • Boat electrofishing survey of Lake Ngaroto

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Brijs, Jeroen (2009-10)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Ngaroto, a 130-ha hypertrophic lake located near Te Awamutu, has previously been found to contain a diverse fish fauna of both native and introduced fish. Native fish in the lake are common bullies (Gobiomorphus cotidianus), shortfin eels (Anguilla australis), longfin eels (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and common smelt (Retropinna retropinna). Introduced species include goldfish (Carassius auratus), brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus), rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus), gambusia (Gambusia affinis) and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio), with some koi carp/goldfish hybrids. As part of the ongoing research of the invasive fish research programme, run by the Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research (CBER), current baseline values for species abundance and indigenous biodiversity need to be established for at least 5 Waikato lakes over 5 ha in size, with Lake Ngaroto selected as a candidate.

    View record details
  • A sensitive genetic-based detection capability for Didymosphenia geminate (Lyngbye) M. Schmidt: Phases two and three

    Cary, S. Craig; Hicks, Brendan J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Rueckert, Andreas; Gemmill, Chrissen E.C.; Barnett, Catherine Margaret Eleanor (2007-10)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This study sought to develop a sensitive DNA-based protocol capable of detecting D. germinate in environmental samples with extreme sensitivity. This report is a direct extension from our previous interim report and addresses the subsequent progress in the development and validation of two DNA detection methods for D. germinata.

    View record details
  • Field trip guide to the Onland Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary Record, Eastern Taranaki Basin Margin

    Nelson, Campbell S.; Kamp, Peter J.J. (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This field guide affords a north to south transect through examples of the Mesozoic to Quaternary sedimentary succession exposed in the Waikato, King Country and coastal strip of the eastern Taranaki basins, with particular focus on the Oligocene and Miocene deposits and how these link into the offshore parts of Taranaki Basin. The trip starts in Hamilton and ends at Tongaporutu on the north Taranaki coast, with overnight accommodation available at either Awakino or Mokau. Primarily under both local and more distant tectonic control, the stops provide examples of the various carbonate and terrigenous (locally volcaniclastic)-dominated facies associated with marginal marine, shoreline, shelf and slope-to-basin depositional settings, and their stratigraphic architecture and wider sequence stratigraphic context. Along the way, visits are recorded to basement greywacke, serpentinite and limestone quarries.

    View record details
  • Field trip guide to Oligocene Limestones and Caves in the Waitomo District

    Nelson, Campbell S.; Hendy, Chris H. (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The field guide runs from Hamilton to Waitomo to Te Anga and return in limestone-dominated country developed in transgressive sedimentary deposits of the Oligocene Te Kuiti Group – a world class example of a temperate shelf carbonate depositional system. Attention focuses on the nature, distribution and paleoenvironmental controls of the main limestone facies and some of the mixed terrigenous-carbonate facies in the Group. Along the way features of the Waitomo karst landscape are noted and the trip concludes by going underground in the Ruakuri Cave to discuss cave origins and the evidence for paleoenvironmental changes locked up in speleothems.

    View record details
  • Environmental effects of the Manganui ski field, Mt Taranaki/Egmont

    Efford, Jackson Tai; Bylsma, Rebecca Johanna; Clarkson, Bruce D. (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    During May 2012, the environmental effects of the Manganui ski field were examined. Permanent quadrats first established in 1974 to monitor vegetation changes were re-measured, vegetation mapping was conducted, modifications to ground form and drainage were identified, soil compaction was examined, and stream water from the ski field catchment was tested for nutrient enrichment. This report focusses primarily on the lower Manganui ski field, as the upper Manganui ski field consists mostly of unmodified herbfield or gravelfield, protected by a sufficient snow base over the winter months. The lower Manganui ski field has a long history of modification spanning from the early 1900s. Vegetation types mapped on the lower field included unmown tussockfield, mown tussock-herbfield, shrubland and exotics. The re-measurement of vegetation in permanent quadrats on the lower field suggests that since the last re-measurement in 1994, several exotic species have increased in cover, including Carex ovalis, Poa annua, and Agrostis capillaris (percentage cover increases of up to 46.6%, 42.0% and 20.7% respectively). Vegetation mapping and historic photographs indicate that the lower ski field sits within the elevational belt of shrubland vegetation, little of which remains due to regular mowing conducted on the field since 1947. Shrubs which have been largely excluded from the field through mowing include Brachyglottis elaeagnifolius, Hebe odora, Ozothamnus vauvilliersii, Dracophyllum filifolium, Pseudopanax colensoi, Raukaua simplex and Hebe stricta var. egmontiana. Areas of the ski field dominated by exotic vegetation were predominantly associated with historic culvert construction and rock dynamiting. Compaction by machinery was confined to the sensitive mossfield area at the base of the lower field.

    View record details
  • Evaluation of the Hamilton City Council plants for Gullies programme

    Clarkson, Bruce D.; Clarkson, Fiona Marie; Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This evaluation found that the Hamilton City Council Plants for Gullies programme is successfully facilitating the restoration and enhancement of Hamilton City gullies by private gully owners. The mean number of native species in surveyed gullies was 2.1 in non-restored sites and 18.4 in restored sites. While the mean number of invasive species was 4.1 in non-restored sites to 2.6 in restored sites. This quantitative measure is a valuable indication of the ecosystem gains for Hamilton City. Hamilton gully owners are very satisfied with the Plants for Gullies programme; the mean satisfaction rating was 8.9 out of 10. These residents dedicate significant time and energy to restoring their gully sections; the mean time contribution of survey participants was 10.3 hours per month. Gully owners were found to be utilising knowledge acquired through participation in the programme to add valuable diversity to their gully ecosystems. This was repeatedly demonstrated by programme participants not only reintroducing the native plants supplied by the programme but also adding large quantities of privately-sourced plants. This investigation found that the Plants for Gullies and Gully Restoration programmes are effective in communicating key ecological restoration concepts. This was reflected by gully owner prioritisation of eco-sourcing, biodiversity and weed control as considerations in their restoration projects. The Gully Restoration Guide was found to be the most valuable component of the programme’s educational tools. However, it is recommended that this resource is updated to support the many gully owners who require information for advanced stages of ecological restoration. In summary, the Plants for Gullies programme is successfully delivering gully restoration assistance and advice to gully owners, which is resulting in significant improvements to Hamilton City’s gully systems. The programme is valued by all who are involved and could be recommended to other New Zealand cities as an effective model for environmental restoration and community engagement.

    View record details
  • Ecological study of Hickford Park and coastal walkway route options

    Bylsma, Rebecca Johanna; Efford, Jackson Tai (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    An ecological study of Hickford Park, (New Plymouth) was conducted by the Environmental Research Institute, University of Waikato, for the New Plymouth District Council. The main ecological features of the park were mapped and described and recommendations were made for the future management of the site. Hickford Park encompasses significant wetland habitat (Waipu Lagoons and oxidation ponds), sections of planted native species, an extensive duneland system, exotic plantation forest, grazed pasture, sports playing fields and the recently completed Taranaki Velodrome. The Waipu Lagoons represent a rare coastal lagoon ecosystem type in Taranaki, and host a diverse range of native wetland flora and fauna. The acclaimed coastal walkway currently extends half way through Hickford Park to St Andrews Drive. The environmental impacts of several proposed routes for the extension of the coastal walkway through the remainder of the park to Bell Block beach were assessed and recommendations made for the preferred route from an ecological perspective. In summary: • Indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna should not be disturbed if an alternative option is available. Possible ecological impacts of the walkway development may include removal of native vegetation, impact on dune system, alteration to land contours and slope, soil disturbance and sediment input to waterways. • Construction of the coastal walkway along the originally proposed route option (1.1) would require both vegetation removal and re-contouring and would result in a decrease or degradation of natural dune habitat. • Route option 1.2 appears to be the most feasible option, as the Waitara sewer line has previously been installed in the same location and no vegetation removal would be required. • Route options 1.2, 1.3 and the proposed walkway links, provide an opportunity to enhance the public’s appreciation of the ecology within Hickford Park. • In all cases, the ecological effects of the preferred walkway route should be offset via enhancement and restoration plantings.

    View record details
  • Storm water inflow to Oranga Lake, University of Waikato Hamilton Campus

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Oranga Lake is one of three constructed lakes located on the University of Waikato Hamilton campus. It has had persistent problems of high turbidity, prolific seasonal macrophyte growths and phytoplankton blooms. Recent restoration measures of pest fish removal, sediment removal and alum dosing resulted in some improvements in water clarity. But these improvements appear to have been largely temporary and water clarity is low, reducing the aesthetic value of the lake which is located in a prominent area of the campus. This study was commissioned by Facilities Management Division of the University of Waikato to determine the extent to which inputs from the main storm water inflow to Oranga Lake contribute to poor water clarity in the lake. Discharge, suspended sediment and nutrients were sampled from the main inflow on 12 occasions. These samples related to four storm events over a three-month period from November 2013 to January 2014. Sampling was conducted with the objective of capturing periods of high, medium and low flows during three separate storm events. This was achieved on two occasions during November; however, the low-intensity, short-duration storm events that occurred in January resulted in limited runoff and were not considered representative of a major summer storm event.

    View record details
  • PUCM Practice Development Programme (PDP): February 2005

    PUCM: Planning Under Co-operative Mandates (2005-02)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this report is to identify a Practice Development Programme (PDP) for the presentation of relevant innovative practices and tools arising out of the first two Phases of PUCM (Planning Under Co-operative Mandates). During Phase 3 of the research (2004-2006) the PDP will be extended as new findings come to hand.

    View record details
  • Hotspots: Modelling capacity for vector-borne disease risk analysis in New Zealand: A case study of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus incursions in New Zealand

    de Wet, Neil; Slaney, David; Ye, Wei; Hales, Simon; Warrick, Richard A. (2005-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This Hotspots case study of Oc. camptorhynchus in New Zealand forms part of the wider aims and objectives of the Hotspots project. The overall aims of the case study were: 1. To evaluate the performance of the Hotspots model as a risk analysis tool for Oc. camptorhynchus; 2. To use and learn from the experience of the various incursions of Oc. camptorhynchus in order to critically assess and improve the model; 3. To gain experience in using the model for risk analysis for Oc. camptorhynchus in particular, and in so doing, also develop experience applicable to risk analysis for other vectors of concern (Table 1); and, 4. To develop an experience and knowledge base as well as guidelines for future use of the model in its various applications related to biosecurity, surveillance and risk assessment and management.

    View record details