1,487 results for Report, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • State of our Gulf 2014 Hauraki Gulf - Tikapa Moana/ Te Moananui a Toi State of the Environment Report 2014

    Kelly, S; Sim-Smith, C; Faire, S; Pierre, J; Hikuroa, Daniel (2014-09-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act (2000). It follows on from the 2011 State of our Gulf Report, which highlighted the incredible transformation the Hauraki Gulf had undergone within the last two human lifespans. Over that period a number of native terrestrial species were driven to extinction, native forests and vast wetlands were cleared and replaced with pastoral land, sediment eroded from the land reduced water quality and muddied the Gulf’s estuaries, ecologically important marine habitats were destroyed, populations of fished species were depleted, and urban development led to the loss, modification and contamination of the coast. Most of the indicators examined in 2011 suggested that the Gulf was continuing to experience ongoing environmental degradation, and/or that resources were continuing to be lost or suppressed at environmentally low levels. In response, the Hauraki Gulf Forum developed a strategic framework for action and urged agencies to work collectively on making urgent progress in the following areas: R: A regenerating network of marine protected areas and island sanctuaries. E: Enhancement of fisheries with improved environmental outcomes. M: Mana whenua relationships reflected in resource management practice. A: Active land management to minimise inputs of sediments, nutrients and contaminants. K: Knowledge utilisation within an ecosystem-based management framework. This update re-examines the state of the Gulf and considers progress toward integrated management and the strategic outcomes sought by the Forum.

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  • Sea Change - Tai Timu Tai Pari, Independent Review Panel First Report

    Beverley, P; Ehler, C; Battershill, C; Hikuroa, Daniel; Boven, R (2014-08-21)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Phase II Evaluation of a Gerontology Nurse Specialist in Primary Healthcare.

    King, Anna; Boyd, Michal; Raphael, Deborah; Foster, S; Dagley, E; Calverley, R (2014-04)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Part 1: Intervention for a high needs older population Part 2: Development of a dementia toolkit Part 3: Integrated Transition of Care - Rapid response intervention Health Workforce New Zealand Innovation Projects Funding In collaboration with: Waitemata DHB, Comprehensive Care Ltd in association with Waitemata PHO and the University of Auckland

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  • When people understand sustainability, do they change their behaviour?

    Birdsall, Sally; Glasgow, B (2014-04-30)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of this research was to explore the effects of Year 12 students’ engagement in the Education for Sustainability Achievement Standard 90810. This achievement standard is part of the National Certificate of Educational Achievement [NCEA] and requires students to identify a sustainability issue, plan an action to either mitigate or solve that issue, implement it and then reflect on the efficacy of that action. The research also explored the possibility of such effects influencing these students’ friends and families.

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  • Report to the Blood Service: Behavioural Donor Deferral Criteria Review

    Independent Expert Review Group; Paul, C; Moore, A; Dickson, N; Storey, G; Peters, J; Ritchie, Stephen; Saxton, Peter; Scott, R; Parish, P; McDonald, G (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Changes to blood donor deferral in New Zealand: Gay community summary guide

    Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Deafness Notification Report (2012) Hearing loss (not remediable by grommets) in New Zealanders under the age of 19

    Digby, J; Purdy, Suzanne; Kelly, AS (2013-05)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gender Advisory Support for Grass-roots Health Projects in Papua New Guinea

    Underhill-Sem, Yvonne; Peutalo, B (2006-04-26)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Social impacts of gambling in Manukau City

    Rankine, Jennifer; Haigh, D (2003)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Housing and Health in Auckland

    Rankine, Jennifer (2005)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report summarises selected recent research into housing and health in the Auckland urban region. It was commissioned by Auckland Regional Public Health Services, which has a housing brief. It is written for public health and health promotion workers, local government, Housing New Zealand Corporation (HNZC) and non-governmental organisations with an interest in housing issues.

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  • Media and te Tiriti o Waitangi 2007

    Rankine, Jennifer; Nairn, Raymond; Barnes, AM; Gregory, A; Kaiwai, H; Borell, B; McCreanor, T (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Women and Alcohol in Aotearoa/New Zealand - Te waipiro me ngā wāhine i Aotearoa

    Rankine, Jennifer; Gregory, A; Tonks, A; Thompson-Evans, TP (2013)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tau puipuiaga Faka-Niue ke taofi e mahani kolokolovao/ Niue pathways to the prevention of sexual violence

    Kingi, P; Rankine, Jennifer; Percival, T (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Part of a multi-ethnic (Samoan, Cook Island, Tonga, Niue, Fiji, Tokelau and Tuvalu) research project aiming to: Discuss ethnic-specific Pacific views of sexual violence, including protective and risk factors Analyse the extent to which traditional Pacific cultural sexual violence prevention methods have been upheld or have broken down within the New Zealand context Examine Pacific cultural sexual violence prevention approaches that could be further developed by sexual violence workforce in New Zealand Determine the feasibility and appropriateness of traditional Pacific cultural sexual violence prevention approaches in New Zealand Pacific contexts Extract positive messages and useful points for prevention, intervention and post-intervention Provide recommendations for further developing Pacific pathways for sexual violence prevention. This project also intends to analyse relevant cosmology, language, rituals, protocols, behaviours, narratives, symbols, genealogies and practices as potential sources of pacific core values, ethics and beliefs relevant to healthy and safe relationships and sexual violence prevention.

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  • Ko na auala faka-Tokelau ke puipui ai na amio faifakaulugaliki fakamalohi/Tokelau pathways to the prevention of sexual violence

    Hope, LT; Rankine, Jennifer; Percival, T (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is part of a qualitative research project conducted among seven ethnic communities in Aotearoa – Cook Islands, Fiji, Niue, Samoa, Tokelau, Tonga and Tuvalu.

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  • Interim Report from a Perspective of the Organic Linkage between Research and the Construction of Learners’ Corpus of Japanese as a Second Language by International Cooperation

    Kondo, Reiko; Sakoda, K; Nishina, K; et al. (2014-03-28)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Seventh annual report of the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee: Reporting mortality 2011

    Farquhar, CM (2013-06)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is the seventh annual report of the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee (PMMRC). The aim of this committee is to identify areas in maternity and newborn care where improvements could be made. The purpose of this report is to provide an accurate estimate of the numbers and rates of perinatal and maternal deaths in New Zealand, to describe the risk factors for perinatal and maternal deaths, and to attempt to identify where the attention of maternity and neonatal services might be focused to prevent perinatal and maternal deaths.

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  • National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan for Indigenous Communities

    Langton, M; Parsons, Meg; Leonard, S; Auty, K; Bell, D; Burgess, P; Edwards, S; Howitt, R; Jackson, S; McGrath, V; Morrison, J (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    NCCARF developed a National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan (NARP) for Indigenous Communities in 2012 to identify research required to provide decision makers within government, industry and communities with the information they need to effectively respond and adapt to the impacts of climate change on Indigenous communities. The Indigenous Communities NARP identifies what information is needed to increase understanding of climate change adaptation for Australia’s Indigenous communities. It outlines research priorities that will inform decisions about adapting to climate change to produce effective, efficient and equitable strategies and outcomes. This Plan will guide governments and other investors over the next five years to fund research to deliver maximum benefit to Indigenous communities, and provide a broad framework for longer term research planning.

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  • A psychosocial needs assessment of communities in 14 conflict-affected districts in Aceh

    Good, M-JD; Good, BJ; Grayman, Jesse Hession; Lakoma, M (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Between December 2005 and November 2006, a team of researchers from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Department of Social Medicine from Harvard Medical School, carried out a Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA) in high conflict sub-districts across Aceh, in two phases. Phase 2, or Psychosocial Needs Assessment 2 (PNA2) conducted research in 75 high conflict villages in 11 districts throughout Aceh. The PNA2 report is an extension of the research for Psychosocial Needs Assessment 1 (PNA1), which was conducted in high conflict sub districts in Aceh Utara, Bireuen and Pidie, Aceh in February 2006. Research for this second study was conducted in 10 districts in July 2006 with funding from the World Bank, Decentralization Support Facility (DSF), IOM, and the Harvard Medical School, and in Aceh Besar district in November 2006, funded by IOM and the Harvard Medical School. The primary focus of this report is to provide findings from the PNA2 data and to compare these data with data previously analysed and published in the first Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA1) report.(1) Research for PNA1 was funded by the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, IOM and Harvard Medical School. The basic goal of the overall project was to evaluate the psychosocial and mental health needs in communities which have been deeply affected by the years of conflict between armed forces of the Republic of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM), given the cessation of violence after the signing of the August 2005 Memorandum of Understanding. This report focuses on past traumatic experiences and current psychosocial and mental health needs in high conflict areas throughout Aceh. Although the peace agreement ended almost three decades of violence most of the traumatic experiences reported date from the early 1990's until August 2005. The report deliberately refrains from identifying groups or individuals instrumental in the violence visited upon these communities.

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  • Psychosocial Needs Assessment of Communities Affected by the Conflicts in the Districts of Pidie, Biereuen, and Aceh Utara

    Good, BJ; Good, M-JD; Grayman, Jesse Hession; Lakoma, M (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Between December 2005 and February 2006, a team of researchers from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Department of Social Medicine from Harvard Medical School, carried out a Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA) in three high conflict districts on the northeast coast of the province of Aceh (N.A.D.), with financial support from the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and an IOM contract with Harvard Medical School. The basic goal of the assessment was to evaluate the psychosocial and mental health needs in communities which have been deeply affected by the years of conflict between armed forces of the Republic of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement(G.A.M.),given the cessation of violence following the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding of August 15, 2005. This report focuses on current psychosocial and mental health needs in high conflict areas of Pidie, Bireuen, and Aceh Utara and deliberately refrains from identifying groups or individuals instrumental in the violence visited upon these communities.

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  • Vulnerability analysis of unreinforced masonry churches (EQC 14/660) - Final Report

    Goded, T; Cattari, S; Lagomarsino, S; Giovinazzi, S; Ingham, Jason; Marotta, A; Liberatore, D; Sorrentino, L; Ottonelli, D; Pinna, M; Clark, W (2016-06-30)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We undertake the first (to our knowledge) seismic vulnerability method specifically designed for New Zealand Unreinforced Masonry (URM) churches. The vulnerability index (VI) methodology developed by Lagomarsino et al. (2003) for European churches and other monumental buildings has been the basis for our work. The technique entails a macroseismic approach which is based on the use of vulnerability curves to correlate the postseismic damage grade of the building to the shaking intensity experienced, using a discrete probabilistic distribution. The method has been redefined, with a new set of parameters and modifiers specifically created for New Zealand URM churches. This has been done by analysing the damage caused to 48 URM churches in the Canterbury region during the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence. This report shows the main achievements obtained during this project, funded by the Earthquake Commission (reference 14/660, January 2014-June 2016), which include: (a) the structural data compilation of a wider stock of 297 URM churches spread within New Zealand; (b) a specific typological classification for New Zealand unreinforced masonry (URM) churches; (c) a damage survey form for URM churches; (d) a macroseismic method to obtain the seismic vulnerability of URM churches using VI modifiers that have been developed specifically for New Zealand URM churches, using the damage data from the Canterbury earthquakes; and (e) the development of seismic scenarios for the URM churches in Wellington, Auckland and Dunedin, using the new parameters developed within this project. The typological analysis of the New Zealand URM churches justified the need to develop a method specifically created for this country, as results show the great differences in typologies to European churches, with very simple architectural designs and a majority of one nave churches in New Zealand. The method has been applied to three cities in New Zealand, with very different seismic activity, from low (Auckland) to intermediate (Dunedin) and high (Wellington). Differences in the results due to the different characteristic scenarios show the need to develop specific scenarios for each city / region. This project is seen as a first step towards the qualification of all the historical buildings in the country, in order to preserve New Zealand’s cultural and historical heritage. Future work identified includes (a) the development of seismic scenarios for the URM churches in the rest of New Zealand, (b) addition of site effects to the seismic scenarios, to account for local differences in intensities experienced in each church, to be developed for the entire set of URM churches in the country, (c) development of a more sophisticated method based on the mechanical approach that analyses the structural behaviour of individual components of the building (macroelements) and (d) the addition of other buildings part of the cultural heritage in New Zealand.

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