1,487 results for Report, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Ruakaka Wastewater Long Term Resource Consents Project. Cultural Impact and Assessment Report

    Kepa, Tangiwai (2009-05)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Historical Background The development of Te Poupouwhenua, the Ruakaka/Marsden Point area, began in the mid-1860s, after large stretches of land were taken from Māori by the Crown. The idea that development, meaning industrialization, considerably improved the lives of all New Zealanders is well documented. However, the alienation of Māori from the sea and their ancestral lands was (and continues to be) an adverse consequence of development. Māori with lands around Te Poupouwhenua included people from Patuharakeke Hapū. The tribe had lands taken from them so that roads and towns could be built for the settlement of British immigrants and the establishment of industry. In the 20th century, the Takahiwai Hills and the Pukekauri Land Block were taken from Patuharakeke Hapū under the Public Works Act. The construction of the New Zealand Oil Refining Company and the deepwater port at Koutu, Marsden Point, resulted in parts of the sea and the ancestral lands becoming permanently inaccessible to the people. In the 21st century, the Takahiwai Hills continue to be excavated for metal and the seabed for sand. The construction of roads, railways, ports and cities continues! What Māori has experienced as a result of all the development is the process of weakening the relationship between culture and specific place; however, the disconnection does not mean that culture has lost value and relevance for Patuharakeke Hapū. In 1998 a Tiriti o Waitangi Claim was lodged with the Waitangi Tribunal to address concerns that Patuharakeke Hapū has with questionable land sales, land confiscations etc that took place in the mid 1860s. The claim was accepted by the Waitangi Tribunal and was designated Waitangi Tribunal Claim # 745. The Waitangi Tribunal Claim # 745 seeks redress for the wrongs inflicted on Patuharakeke Hapū by the Crown (The New Zealand Government) for breaches of the Tiriti o Waitangi which was signed by the Chiefs of Aotearoa and the representatives of Queen Victoria (Queen of Britain) at the time.

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  • Services Under Challenge: Critical success factors in meeting high and complex needs of people in mental health care

    Kidd, Jacqueline; Lampshire, D (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report provides information about mental health services in New Zealand that have successfully adjusted service provision to meet "high and complex needs‟ of some service users. Some people with mental health and addiction problems appear unable to have their needs met through mental health and addiction services. They continue to cycle in and out of care, and for various reasons, they prove a challenge to services. Rather than exploring the perceived failings of services, the Mental Health Advocacy Coalition (MHAC) wanted to discover what happened in services that stepped up to the challenge and changed what they did for the benefit of this group of service users. This project aimed to identify and analyse examples of such services. The researchers conducted interviews with 16 service managers and key workers and 23 service users. Participating services included three District Health Board (DHB) providers and five non-governmental organisations (NGOs) across the middle and upper North Island. In answer to the question: "What has made your care successful?‟, the participants – whether managers, key workers or service users – universally identified „relationships‟. This answer applied to broad intrasectoral relationships between the mental health sector and social agencies such as Work and Income, Housing New Zealand and workplaces; intrasectoral relationships between specialist and community services, DHB provider arm services and NGOs; and DHB funders and planners and all contract holders. This answer also applied to the close, committed, "give a damn‟ relationships between service users and their carers – regardless of the background and qualifications of the carer. These relationships formed the springboard for meeting needs such as having a settled and safe place to live, working, reconnecting with whānau and communities and making friends. Clinical expertise was not considered the foundation of these successful services; rather, it was the services‟ ability to negotiate the need for clinical care within those relationships and in support of meeting those human needs.

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  • RESEARCH INTO THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPORT PARTICIPATION, TRUANCY, SELF-ESTEEM AND SCHOOL CONNECTEDNESS: FINAL REPORT, commissioned by Sport and Recreation NZ

    Widdowson, Deborah; Dixon, Robyn (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPORT PARTICIPATION, TRUANCY, SELF-ESTEEM AND SCHOOL CONNECTEDNESS ABSTRACT Truancy among secondary school students is a significant and ongoing problem in New Zealand (Ministry of Education, 2007; 2010). Research has shown a relationship between truancy and a range of at-risk behaviours (Fergusson, Lynskey & Horwood, 1995), while resiliency research has identified protective factors for at-risk adolescents, including connectedness to adults and school and participation in extracurricular activities, like sport (Resnick, 2000, p159). Research has also shown that physical activity has positive effects on a range of academic, social and psychological outcomes (Marsh & Kleitman, 2003). Moreover, evidence suggests that the development of physical competence has a strong effect on self-esteem, confidence and peer acceptance (Bailey, 2005). Yet, little is known of the impact of participation in sport on school behaviour and school attendance (Bailey, 2005). Understanding the contribution of participation in sport and physical activity to protective factors like school-connectedness, and school attendance, is an important area worthy of investigation. This study examines the relationship between secondary school students’ participation in school sport and physical activity, self-esteem/self-concept, school connectedness and school attendance. The study employs a mixed methods research design with a follow-up explanations model. The sample consisted of a total of 2463 Year 9, 10 and 11 students from four, large, co-educational, low decile secondary schools in South Auckland. Two schools had a high sporting emphasis and two had a low sporting emphasis. Students completed an anonymous questionnaire about their participation in sport, physical and academic self-concept, connectedness to school and truanting behaviour. Following preliminary analyses of questionnaire data, eight focus group discussions – two at each school – were conducted with a total of 93 students. Overall, findings reveal a relationship between participation in school sport, academic self-concept, school connectedness and truanting. Participation in sport reliably predicted school attendance in that participation was associated with a reduced amount of serious truancy. A positive association was also found between sport participation and academic self-concept and school connectedness. This study highlights the value of school sport in contributing to positive student outcomes and suggests strategies that may assist in reducing truancy.

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  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

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  • ASPIRE: Assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders

    Parsons, M; Anderson, C; Senior, H; Chen, X; Kerse, N; Jorgensen, D; Brown, P; Jacobs, Stephen; Vanderhoorn, S; Kilpatrick, J (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Assessment of Services Promoting Independence and Recovery in Elders (ASPIRE) was a prospective meta-analysis 1 of three initiatives designed to promote independence and continued living in the community for elderly people (ageing-in-place). The three initiatives are: • The Community Flexible Integrated Restorative Support Team (Community FIRST) initiative in Hamilton; a restorative home support model of care; • The Promoting Independence Programme (PIP) in Lower Hutt; a rehabilitation services model of care; and • The Coordinator of Services for Elderly (COSE) initiative in Christchurch; an individual case-management model of care. This report presents the results of a cost effectiveness analysis of each of the three ageing-in-place initiatives to assess their cost effectiveness relative to the elderly receiving conventional health care services (usual care) in each region. The study design was based around 3 randomised controlled trials with a total sample size for analysis of 564 older people assessed as having high or very high needs, across the 3 centres; Christchurch had a much larger sample size with 350 participants compared with 111 in Hamilton and 103 in Lower Hutt.

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  • ASPIRE: Assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders

    Parsons, Matthew; Anderson, C; Senior, H; Chen, X; Kerse, N; Jorgensen, D; Brown, P; Jacobs, S; Vanderhoorn, S; Kilpatrick, J (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Assessment of Services Promoting Independence and Recovery in Elders (ASPIRE) was a prospective meta-analysis 1 of three initiatives designed to promote independence and continued living in the community for elderly people (ageing-in-place). The three initiatives are: • The Community Flexible Integrated Restorative Support Team (Community FIRST) initiative in Hamilton; a restorative home support model of care; • The Promoting Independence Programme (PIP) in Lower Hutt; a rehabilitation services model of care; and • The Coordinator of Services for Elderly (COSE) initiative in Christchurch; an individual case-management model of care. This report presents the results of a cost effectiveness analysis of each of the three ageing-in-place initiatives to assess their cost effectiveness relative to the elderly receiving conventional health care services (usual care) in each region. The study design was based around 3 randomised controlled trials with a total sample size for analysis of 564 older people assessed as having high or very high needs, across the 3 centres; Christchurch had a much larger sample size with 350 participants compared with 111 in Hamilton and 103 in Lower Hutt.

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  • Tree-ring analysis of kauri (Agathis australis) timbers from a partially demolished house, 6 Stokes Road, Mt Eden, Auckland City.

    Boswijk, G (2012)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tree-ring analysis of sub-fossil kauri (Agathis australis) from Verberne Farm, Korariwhero Flat, Dargaville, Northland.

    Boswijk, G; Palmer, J (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is a technical archive report describing crossdating and chronology development of tree-ring samples from Verberne Farm, Korariwhero Flat, near Dargaville. Please note that although the tree-ring dates presented here will not change, it is possible that interpretation of the results may change as new evidence comes to light.

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  • Measurement of family violence at a population level: What might be needed to develop reliable and valid family violence indicators?

    Gulliver, P; Fanslow, Janet (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Issues Paper reviews some of the available sources of data on family violence, assesses strengths and limitations of these data sources for measuring trends in family violence, and seeks to assist the reader to develop an understanding of the issues associated with family violence data collections. Government agencies, non-government organisations and researchers all require reliable measures of family violence to understand the magnitude of the problem, to appropriately target resources, and to identify strategies that are effective in reducing and ultimately eliminating family violence. In this paper we: Draw attention to the data that is currently available in New Zealand; Assess the strengths and weaknesses of this data in relation to monitoring trends in family violence at the population level; Highlight opportunities for further development of existing datasets, drawing on the experiences of other developed countries; Consider some of the implications for reporting family violence data at the national level; and Suggest some future courses of action which could support the development of reliable and valid family violence indicators.

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  • Tools to support multi-agency collaboration

    Murphy, C; Fanslow, Janet (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Collaboration and coordination are key to effective responses to family violence, however they are intricate and challenging in practice. This list of articles, reports, and tools was collated during the development of the New Zealand Family Violence Clearinghouse Issues Paper, “Building collaborations to eliminate family violence: facilitators, barriers and good practice”. It is intended to provide readers with helpful tips, tools and strategies considered critical to the effective functioning of collaborative family violence initiatives. It is not exhaustive or definitive. Section headings within the document guide readers to the aspect of coordinated response being discussed.Topics covered include: (1) Tangata whenua; (2) General information about multi-agency collaboration; (3) Case management resources; (4) Diversity resources; (5) Communication skills; (6) Prevention; (7) Real stories; (8) Gender analysis; (9) National accountability framework; and, (10) Governance.

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  • A Detailed Review of the Worldwide Reinjection Experience in Power ProducingGeothermal Fields

    Kaya, Eylem; Zarrouk, Sadiq; O'Sullivan, M; Brockbank, K (2014-02-24)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 we conducted a review of the worldwide experiences with injection in geothermal fields based on information from 91 electric-power producing geothermal projects. In the present review we have extended the database to include detailed information about these fields: such as their installed capacity, reservoir information, production and injection conditions, their reinjection strategies and response of different type of geothermal reservoirs to these strategies. The reports and articles available in the open literature were the main source of this review report. Additional information is also presented in the database in order to provide details about each field. This information is summarized in tables and includes data relevant to the steamfield (drilled area, number of production and injection wells, type of reservoir, reservoir temperature and average enthalpy, reservoir depth), to the power plant (type of plant, installed capacity, annual electricity production, number of units, total and steam production rates) and to the type of reinjection (injection strategy and rate). Experience from these ninety-one electric-power producing geothermal fields shows that: a reinjection plan should be planned at the very earliest stages of field development and is likely to change with time depending on the response of the field to various strategies. An optimum reinjection design should balance the requirements to sustain the reservoir pressure and to prevent early breakthrough of cold reinjected water. Also the effects of reinjection on the natural hot recharge, and therefore on energy recovery from the system is an important matter to consider.

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  • Growing New Zealand Businesses: Summary of survey findings

    Whittaker, David; Fath, Benjamin; Fiedler, Antje; Simmons, Glenn (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Growing New Zealand Businesses (GNZB) is a project being undertaken by staff and research students at The University of Auckland Business School (UABS). It seeks to understand growth and innovation activities and challenges of New Zealand small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The project is creating a knowledge base which will inform teaching and related outreach activities, and ultimately to assist the growth and development of New Zealand SMEs. A key part of the project is a GNZB survey, developed in collaboration with researchers at the University of Cambridge, and the University of Queensland Business School. The survey was carried out in late 2010 – early 2011, against a backdrop of continued sluggishness in the economy in the wake of the global financial crisis, and between the first and second major Canterbury earthquakes. The GNZB Survey was sent to the Chief Executive Officer of 11,188 manufacturing and business service SMEs (with fewer than 250 employees) in November 2010, with follow-up reminders in late November and mid December. Some (552) were returned unopened (‘wrong address’, ‘business closed’, etc.). Altogether 1911 were filled in and returned, marking an 18% response rate. Of these, 1762 fitted the size (less than 250 employees) and sector (manufacturing and business services) criteria, and are the focus of analysis here. The survey had five sections: General Characteristics of Your Business, Innovation, Competitive Situation and Collaborative Activity, Finance, and You and Your Business. One striking feature of the returns was the care with which they were completed, both in terms of figures provided, and responses to an open question about success and its measurement. This summary is based on descriptive statistics, prior to detailed analysis. The survey itself will be followed by interviews of roughly thirty CEOs, selected from over 50% of respondents who indicated a willingness to be interviewed. In addition, similar surveys carried out in the UK and Australia – and potentially other countries – will provide the basis for comparative analysis and benchmarking. This will further enrich our understanding of New Zealand SMEs, their innovative activities and growth challenges.

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  • Kia mau te kahu whakamauru: Health literacy in palliative care

    Kidd, Jacqueline; Reid, S; Collins, N; Gibbons, V; Black, S; Blundell, R; Peni, T; Ahu, H (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The New Zealand Palliative Care Strategy (Minister of Health 2001) recognised the need for local and national policies that support the specific needs of Maori, including linkages with Maori organisations and care coordinators. While there are increasing numbers of research studies about access to palliative care for Maori and others (Frey et al 2013; Robinson et al 2013), this is the first to have taken a health literacy perspective. Health literacy is described as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions” (Nielsen-Bohlman et al 2004; Ministry of Health 2010a). For health professionals, health literacy is about their ability to communicate health information and build skills and knowledge. For health organisations, health literacy is about the appropriateness of the health information and services they provide for patients and their families as well as the organisational systems and processes to support health professionals to build health literacy. The Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) and the Ministry of Health as the Maori Health Joint Venture, contracted UniServices to identify, from a health literacy perspective, issues for Maori and their whanau in accessing palliative care services. Four key areas in the Request for Proposal of interest were identified, including: 1. Ways in which Maori access palliative care services 2. The current level of Maori health literacy with regards to palliative care 3. The way in which different factors within whanau influence the ability of Maori to obtain, process and understand palliative care information and services 4. Identification of communication models which are effective in enhancing this ability.

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  • Forest Health News: Eucalypt pest gum leaf skeletoniser reaches the central North Island

    Withers, TM; Gresham, B; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo (2014-10)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Corporate Sustainability Reporting in New Zealand

    Griffiths, Kerry; Lindesay, J (2006-10-03)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2002 the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (PCE) signaled in his "Creating Our Future" report, the emergence of "Triple Bottom Line" (environmental, social and economic) reporting in New Zealand: "Other options include the business sector adopting models such as Triple Bottom Line (TBL) reporting and the Natural Step that raise awareness about sustainable ways of doing business." (p17) Since that time TBL reporting has continued to develop in New Zealand in both the public and private sector albeit in a variety of forms and under a variety of names - including Sustainable Development Reporting, Corporate Responsibility Reporting, Sustainability Reporting. This paper provides an update on TBL Reporting in New Zealand since 2002 and covers: - the international context - the state of reporting in New Zealand - the value of reporting - concluding comments While the paper provides a brief commentary on TBL reporting by public sector agencies, the focus of the paper is on reporting by the business sector (including CRIs and state owned enterprises). This paper does not attempt to provide a critical and thorough analysis on the extent to which corporate sustainability reporting contributes to sustainable development per se, although some comment is made on that subject.

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  • Northland Kauri: Auckland and Northland, New Zealand, January 21-15, 2014. Fieldguide for the 9th International Conference on Dendrochronology, Melbourne, Australia, Post Conference Tour (New Zealand).

    Boswijk, G; Fowler, A; Lorrey, A (2014-01-21)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Experiencing integration: A pilot study of consumer and provider experiences of integrated primary health care

    Banfield, M; Parkinson, A; McRae, I; Jowsey, Tanisha; Cox, D; Douglas, K; Strazdins, L; Dawda, P (2016-02-26)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Privacy Patterns

    Thomborson, Clark (2016-12-05)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Inspired by the design patterns of object-oriented software architecture, we offer an initial set of "privacy patterns". Our intent is to describe the most important ways in which software systems can offer privacy to their stakeholders. We express our privacy patterns as class diagrams in the UML (Universal Modelling Language), because this is a commonly-used language for expressing the high-level architecture of an object-oriented system. In this initial set of privacy patterns, we sketch how each of Westin's four states of privacy can be implemented in a software system. In addition to Westin's states of Solitude, Intimacy, Anonymity, and Reserve, we develop a privacy pattern for an institutionalised form of Intimacy which we call Confidence.

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  • Automating R Demonstration Videos

    Murrell, Paul (2016)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This document describes a proof-of-concept for producing R demonstration videos in a fully-automated manner. The “script” for the video consists of a text file containing code chunks paired with text commentary. The video is produced by running the code while recording a screen capture, using text-to-speech software to record audio of the commentary, then combining video and audio with appropriate timings and pauses.

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  • The Starpath Project. Starpath Phase 2. Final Summative Evaluation Report

    Kiro, Cynthia; Hynds, Anne; Eaton, J; Irving, E; Wilson, Aaron; Bendikson, Linda; Cockle, Victoria; Broadwith, Mark; Linley-Richardson, T; Rangi, M (2016-03-31)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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