2 results for Report, ASPIRE: Assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders

  • ASPIRE: Assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders

    Parsons, M; Anderson, C; Senior, H; Chen, X; Kerse, N; Jorgensen, D; Brown, P; Jacobs, Stephen; Vanderhoorn, S; Kilpatrick, J (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Assessment of Services Promoting Independence and Recovery in Elders (ASPIRE) was a prospective meta-analysis 1 of three initiatives designed to promote independence and continued living in the community for elderly people (ageing-in-place). The three initiatives are: • The Community Flexible Integrated Restorative Support Team (Community FIRST) initiative in Hamilton; a restorative home support model of care; • The Promoting Independence Programme (PIP) in Lower Hutt; a rehabilitation services model of care; and • The Coordinator of Services for Elderly (COSE) initiative in Christchurch; an individual case-management model of care. This report presents the results of a cost effectiveness analysis of each of the three ageing-in-place initiatives to assess their cost effectiveness relative to the elderly receiving conventional health care services (usual care) in each region. The study design was based around 3 randomised controlled trials with a total sample size for analysis of 564 older people assessed as having high or very high needs, across the 3 centres; Christchurch had a much larger sample size with 350 participants compared with 111 in Hamilton and 103 in Lower Hutt.

    View record details
  • ASPIRE: Assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders

    Parsons, Matthew; Anderson, C; Senior, H; Chen, X; Kerse, N; Jorgensen, D; Brown, P; Jacobs, S; Vanderhoorn, S; Kilpatrick, J (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Assessment of Services Promoting Independence and Recovery in Elders (ASPIRE) was a prospective meta-analysis 1 of three initiatives designed to promote independence and continued living in the community for elderly people (ageing-in-place). The three initiatives are: • The Community Flexible Integrated Restorative Support Team (Community FIRST) initiative in Hamilton; a restorative home support model of care; • The Promoting Independence Programme (PIP) in Lower Hutt; a rehabilitation services model of care; and • The Coordinator of Services for Elderly (COSE) initiative in Christchurch; an individual case-management model of care. This report presents the results of a cost effectiveness analysis of each of the three ageing-in-place initiatives to assess their cost effectiveness relative to the elderly receiving conventional health care services (usual care) in each region. The study design was based around 3 randomised controlled trials with a total sample size for analysis of 564 older people assessed as having high or very high needs, across the 3 centres; Christchurch had a much larger sample size with 350 participants compared with 111 in Hamilton and 103 in Lower Hutt.

    View record details