135 results for Report, 2008

  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • New Zealand farmer and orchardist attitude and opinion survey 2008 : characteristics of organic, modified conventional (integrated) and organic management, and of the sheep/beef, horticulture and dairy sectors

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Benge, Jayson; Campbell, Hugh; Greer, Glen; Lucock, Dave; Manhire, John; Meadows, Sarah; Moller, Henrik; Saunders, Caroline; Fukuda, Yuki (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study of New Zealand farms (including orchards in the case of the kiwifruit sector). Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic green management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature and effects of production from these different management systems from environmental, economic and social points of view. A survey in 2005 provided the means to examine general farmer attitudes and practices and to assess what differences may occur in the different sectors and for farms under different management systems. It also provided the means to show that the panels were reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The ARGOS research design included a second survey in 2008 in order to test and elaborate on emerging research results. This report is the first presentation of the 2008 results.The questions asked of farmers were sourced from contributions from the team of ARGOS researchers drawing on results and issues in the literature, and from contemporary farming issues. These sources provided too many questions for one questionnaire. Accordingly, two questionnaires were used, one sent to a simple random sample of all New Zealand farmers and the other sent to separate random samples of each of the main farming sectors, namely sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture. The two surveys generated a large data set. In order to make the results easier to comprehend we have presented them in two separate outputs, as follows: 1. Analysis of the three main sectors (sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture) and the three main management systems (conventional, integrated and organic) (this report). 2. Analysis of agriculture generally (see companion report).

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  • Boat electrofishing survey of common smelt and common bullies in the Ohau Channel

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We conducted a boat electrofishing survey of the Ohau Channel, which flows from Lake Rotorua to Lake Rotoiti, on 13 December 2007. The purpose of the survey was to investigate the longitudinal pattern in densities of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) and common bullies (Gobiomorphus cotidianus) along the Ohau Channel. We caught 1,267 fish comprising three native fish species and two introduced fish species in 1.58 km of fished distance at a total of 10 sites. Native species caught were the common smelt, common bully and longfinned eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and introduced species were rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Assuming that the bow-mounted anodes effectively fished a 4 m swath then the total area fished was 6,328 m2 (0.632 ha). Common smelt densities varied among the 10 different sites in the Ohau Channel ranging from 0 to 10.6 fish 100 m-2. Smelt density was higher at the upstream end of the channel near the weir at the Lake Rotorua outlet, decreasing with increasing distance from the weir. Smelt were found in the littoral zones but were not caught in mid-channel habitats. In the upstream reaches of the Ohau Channel, directly below the weir, a high number of juveniles (4.4 fish 100 m-2) were captured compared to the amount of juveniles captured at the other sites (0 – 1.2 fish 100 m-2). Common bully densities varied among the 10 different sites in the Ohau Channel ranging from 0.2 to 58.3 fish 100 m-2. No longitudinal pattern in the distribution of common bullies was evident along the channel. The highest densities were found halfway along the Ohau Channel where there was an abundance of dense macrophyte beds. Common bully densities were found to be much higher in the edge habitats with macrophyte beds compared to the mid-channel habitats and the willow edge habitat where there were relatively low densities. Size frequency data shows that there is generally a higher proportion of small bullies than larger ones suggesting that recruitment is occurring. Both adult and juvenile rainbow trout were observed in the Ohau Channel. Most of these individuals were found in the upstream section of the channel below the weir and ranged from a 75 mm juvenile to a fully grown adult about 500 mm long. Large longfinned eels were also captured and were only found in the downstream section of the Ohau Channel in willow-dominated edges. In the bottom third section of the channel, near the possible artificial embayment, goldfish were present.

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  • Stratigraphic columns and correlations for the Late Eocene - Oligocene Te Kuiti Group, central-western North Island, New Zealand

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Tripathi, Anand Ratnakar Prasad; Nelson, Campbell S. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report presents a compilation of stratigraphic columns for geological sections and outcrops of Late Eocene – Oligocene Te Kuiti Group units in central-western parts of North Island, New Zealand, between Port Waikato and Awakino. The columns have been prepared as part of a basin analysis investigation undertaken by the Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Research Group in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Waikato, and have been compiled into a common format from recent MSc and PhD theses to make the information more readily available, principally to assist hydrocarbon exploration activities in the region. The columns represent a level of detail underpinning a rationalized lithostratigraphy of the Te Kuiti Group presented in a companion report (Tripathi et al. 2008). This report contains two enclosures, one show in the location of columns in relation to the distribution of the two subgroups (Okoko Subgroup, Castle Craig Subgroup) of the Te Kuiti Group, and the other shows a series of north-south and west-east column correlation panels.

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  • New Zealand Pastoral Farmers and the Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases in the Agricultural Sector

    Rosin, Chris; Cooper, Mark; MacKenzie, Angela; Maegli, Tanja (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The implementation of an emissions trading scheme (ETS) as a policy instrument is intended to contribute to the efficient reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in New Zealand within the limits agreed to in the Kyoto Protocol. The ETS provides the mechanism through which ‘emissions units’ equal to the committed level of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) can be allocated among the sectors of the New Zealand economy. By establishing emission units as tradable items, the ETS would create what is essentially a new commodity that demands inclusion in the financial planning strategies of producers of goods and services. In this manner, the ETS is expected to incentivise the incorporation of GHGs within production strategies. The transition to a carbon economy may, however, prove more difficult than the mere extension of accounting procedures to expenditures of GHG emissions and sequestration of carbon. The conceptual process of envisioning carbon equivalents (both emitted and sequestered forms) has been hampered by at least two factors. First, because the New Zealand economy has experienced an intensification of emissions-generating economic production since agreeing to the Kyoto Protocol, compliance with limits on GHG emissions has largely been represented as an additional cost as producers struggle to compensate for liabilities. In addition, commonly recognised alternatives to the purchase of emissions units (including tree planting) often involve a reduction in production intensity that does not conform to existing understandings of good business practice. Such complicating factors operate with similar impact on industrial and agricultural production.

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  • Causal mapping of ARGOS dairy farms and comparisons to sheep/beef farms

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Agriculture Research Group On Sustainability (ARGOS) is investigating the social, environmental and economic consequences of different management systems in different farming sectors in New Zealand (for more information visit www.argos.org.nz). The sectors being studied include kiwifruit, sheep/beef and dairy, and the systems being studied include conventional, integrated and organic management. Twelve farms under each system are being studied. As part of the ARGOS social objective, causal mapping was used to document how the participating dairy farmers described and explained the factors involved in their farming systems, broadly defined to include economic, social and environmental factors. Participants identified which factors in the 41 provided were important to the management and performance of their farms and linked these together in the form of a map.

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  • Excavations at Te Hoe Mahia Peninsula

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2008-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • TELA: Laptops for teachers evaluation—Final report years 9-13

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann; McGee, Clive; Cooper, Beverley; Forret, Michael; Miller, Thelma; Gardiner, Ben (2008-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this evaluation, three methods of data collection were used: first, six focus groups of teachers in face-to-face meetings, second, a questionnaire sent to teachers in a range of schools, and third, case studies of eight schools participating in the TELA scheme. The focus groups allowed teachers to talk about their experiences and changes in their use of the laptop over the three years. Each year, teachers from twenty focus group secondary schools met in five regions. The annual questionnaire asked teachers about various aspects of their laptops’ experience, including school support for laptops, professional development, their use of laptops at home and in school, and their goals for future use. In this final report, questionnaire results are presented together with the results from focus groups held over three years and case study data from three years of case studies.

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  • TELA: Laptops for teachers evaluation—Final report years 7 & 8

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann; Forret, Michael; McGee, Clive; Miller, Thelma (2008-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this evaluation, two methods of data collection were used: first, two focus groups of teachers in face-to-face meetings and second, a questionnaire sent to teachers in a range of schools. The focus groups allowed teachers to talk about their experiences and changes in their use of the laptop over the three years. Each year, one focus group was held for Year 7 and 8 teachers in full primary schools and the other held for Year 7 and 8 teachers in intermediate schools. The annual questionnaire asked teachers about various aspects of their laptops’ experience, including school support for laptops, professional development, their use of laptops at home and in school, and their goals for future use. In this final report, questionnaire results are presented together with the results from focus groups held over three years.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2007

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2007. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Viewing the world through a wider lens: Māori and council planning documents

    Kennedy, Nathan (2008-07-30)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    My effort to convey an iwi perspective on environmental resource management - what we call kaitiakitanga – should highlight for new planners about to enter the profession that the environmental perspectives of hapū and iwi (which are provided for in the RMA), are currently not well covered in either mainstream local government planning or education.

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  • Māori provisions in plans: Mana whenua, mauri of water, and wahi tapu

    Kennedy, Nathan; Jefferies, Richard (2008-07-31)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The intention of this document is to allow those using Ngā Mahi: Kaupapa Māori Outcomes an Indicators Kete (Jefferies and Kennedy, 2009, PUCM Māori Report 2) to view a range of examples of Māori provisions within statutory planning documents against plans being evaluated. The extracts in this Report 3 on Māori Provisions in Plans relate to the three tikanga in the Ngā Mahi report: Mana Whenua, Mauri (relating to water), and Wähi Tapu. It is intended that as we develop new kete (containing worksheets and user guides) and thereby expand Ngā Mahi, this current report will be revised to include plan provisions relating to additional tikanga.

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  • The use of boat electrofishing for koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) control in the Kauri Point catchment.

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Brijs, Jeroen; Heaphy, John; Bell, Dudley G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The koi carp is an ornamental strain of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) which is believed to be one of the most ecologically detrimental of all freshwater invasive fish species. They are widespread in the Auckland and Waikato region and appear to be spreading both north and south of these areas. The presence of koi carp in 3 ornamental ponds at Kauri Point, Katikati which is located in the western Bay of Plenty region was confirmed in late 2006. Because koi carp is designated an unwanted organism under the Biosecurity Act it was decided by the Department of Conservation (DOC) that an attempt to eradicate them from this locality would occur. One possible option for eradication of koi carp in this catchment was the use of and electric fishing boat from the University of Waikato. This boat operates by putting a pulsed DC current into the water column where it attracts and then incapacitates fish, allowing operators to remove them from the water with hand nets. The Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research (CBER) at the University of Waikato was contracted to attempt to eradicate koi carp from the three ponds at Kauri Point by boat-electrofishing. The objectives were (1) to survey the fish abundance, (2) to remove as mand koi as possible in an attempt for eradication and (3) to estimate the proportion of koi carp removed from the system by boat-electrofishing. On 21 and 22 April 2008, a total of 327 fish comprising of 307 koi carp (137.5 kg of biomass), 1 goldfish(Carassius auratus) and 19 koi-goldfish hybrids were captured and removed from the 3 ponds located within the Kauri Point catchment by a combination of electric fishing (307 fish) and gill netting (20 fish). The majority of these fish (299 koi, 1 goldfish, 19 koi-goldfish hybrids) were removed from the largest pond (pond A). Boat-electrofishing caught a wide size range of koi (70 mm to 510 mm) and at least four distinct size classes of koi were apparent. The high proportion of juvenile (<200 mm) caught along with reasonable numbers of mature males and females in pond A strongly suggests that breeding is occurring within the Kauri Point aquatic ecosystem. Results from analysing scales of a small sub sample of koi (n=34) also shows that there was a wide range of ages of pond A (ages 1 to 8 years old). Pond A had a relatively high density of 4.6 koi carp 100 m⁻² compared to pond B and C which had low densities of 0.5 and 0.2 koi carp 100 m⁻² respectively. No juvenile carp were observed to be present in ponds B and C. Population and total biomass estimates for koi carp in pond A prior to removal of fish were calculated to be 358±66 koi carp and 145.14 ±44.27 kg (mean ±95% C. I) respectively. 299 koi carp or 122.30 kg of biomass (71-84% of the estimated population) were removed from pond A over two days of electric fishing, leaving a possible 125 koi carp or 67.11 kg of biomass remaining in the pond. Boat-electrofishing proved to be a successful too for removing a large proportion of the estimated biomass of koi carp in the Kauri Point ponds. Eradication of koi carp by boat-electrofishing from this system was not possible due to poor water visibility (difficult to spot narcotised carp), limited time allocated and successful koi carp breeding occurring in the ponds. Viable options of koi carp eradication in the Kauri Point catchment would involve the partial draining and poisoning of the three ponds and the associated tributaries where koi carp are found.

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  • Lake Taihu water quality monitoring station: Technical Manual

    McBride, Chris G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Lake Taihu monitoring station was constructed over September and October 2007. It is intended to provide real-time, internet accessible data for the water quality and meteorology of Lake Taihu, as well as contributing to the Global Lakes Ecological Observatory Network (www.gleon.org). The system was commissioned by the Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese academy of Sciences, and designed and built by Chris McBride and Professor David Hamilton of Waikato University, New Zealand, with direction from Associate Professor Guangwei Zhu, and Dr. Liancong Luo (NIGLAS). A range of high quality environmental sensors have been used in order to provide reliable and accurate observations of the climate and limnology at Taihu. The sensors were chosen for their accuracy and long-term stability, however, as with any sensor-based monitoring, regular maintenance and calibration of the sensors is essential for the collection of accurate and precise data over long time periods. This manual is intended to provide background information about the function and configuration of the monitoring system, and to act as a step-by-step guide for the proper cleaning and calibration of the sensors.

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  • BioFish survey of Lake Taupo, 2006

    McBride, Chris G.; Hamilton, David P.; Gibbs, Max M.; White, Paul; Stewart, Louise (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report provides details of a “BioFish” survey of Lake Taupo conducted in 2006. This first BioFish survey of Lake Taupo was initiated in late 2004 and continued until autumn (May) of 2005 (Hamilton et al. 2005). The 2004-5 survey involved deployment of the BioFish along a transect that commenced near the outlet of Lake Taupo, progressed south-west to ‘Station A’, a deep central site near the middle of the lake, and then north-west to include shallower lake bays; Whangamate Bay and Whakaipo Bay. This transect was repeated five times in 2004-5.

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  • A brief review of recent cyanobacteria monitoring results in the Waikato River

    Hamilton, David P. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Herewith is a report on possible reasons for low concentrations of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) cells in the Waikato River in summer 2007-08 compared with previous records from 2003 to 2007. Because of time constraints, this report is a cursory consideration and does not provide the level of detail and analysis required to more fully evaluate phytoplankton succession as it relates to the complex interplay amongst physical, chemical and biological variables. This report was requested by Mighty River Power following a summer when, as a result of drought conditions, the hydro system was operated in a manner similar to 2003, when cyanobacteria blooms(>15,000 cells mL⁻¹) occurred in the upper river and water temperatures were elevated. These operating conditions were characterised by maintenance of high water levels in the hydro dams and low inflows into the system, resulting in relatively long water residence times.

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  • Evaluating remote sensing data classification techniques for mapping freshwater habitats: Trial application in the Tongariro River delta, Lake Taupo

    Ashraf, Muhammad Salman; Brabyn, Lars; Hicks, Brendan J. (2008-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate different classification techniques that can be applied to multi-source satellite remote sensing data to map different freshwater habitat zones. The Tongariro River delta at the southern side of the Lake Taupo was used as a test site to evaluate these techniques.

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  • Fish biosurveillance by genetic methods: a feasibility study

    Knox, Matthew Andrew; Hicks, Brendan J.; Banks, Jonathan C.; Hogg, Ian D. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We evaluated the possibility of isolating DNA from environmental samples to detect and identify invasive fish species based on variation in the sequences for mitochondrial gene region. Goldfish CO1 DNA was successfully amplified from the water in a tank containing goldfish. Sequencing results verified that the DNA extracted from water matched goldfish sequences obtained from DNA extracted from tissue from other sources. We also evaluated the potential of a DNA-based system to detect and identify invasive fish species based on difference in the length of several gene regions. Sequences for the 12S and 16S rRNA genes, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene and the d-loop region downloaded from GenBank suggested that sequences from these genes would contain enough variation to distinguish six pest fish species (koi carp, rudd, brown bullhead catfish, goldfish, perch and gambusia) introduced to New Zealand freshwaters. A 250-nucleotide region of the 16S rRNA gene was successfully amplified and sequenced from fish tissue, faecal material and fish mucus. While sequences from these regions could distinguish fish species, there was insufficient variation in length to identify each fish species. Future directions for this research are suggested.

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  • The ‘frontal lobe’ project: A double-blind, randomized controlled study of the effectiveness of higher level driving skills training to improve frontal lobe (executive) function related driving performance in young drivers

    Isler, Robert B.; Starkey, Nicola J. (2008-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate the effectiveness of higher level skills training on safe driving behaviour of 36 teenage drivers. The participants, who attended the Driver Training Research camp in Taupo (NZ) over a two week period, were 16 to 17 years old and had a valid restricted driver licence. The study focused on four main aims. Firstly, the behavioural characteristics of the sample and their attitudes to risk taking and driving were examined. Results showed that speeding was the most anticipated driving violation, and high levels of confidence were associated with a higher number of crashes and a greater propensity for risk taking. Many, often male participants, also rated their driving skills as superior to others and thought they would be less likely than others to be involved in an accident. Secondly, the relationship between driving performance and executive functioning, general ability and sustained attention was evaluated. Overall, better driving performance and more accurate self-evaluation of driving performance was related to higher levels of executive functions, in particular, working memory, and cognitive switching. In addition, higher general ability and greater ability to sustain attention were also linked to better performance on the driving related assessments. The third focus of this study was to compare the effects of both, higher level and vehicle handling skills training on driving performance, confidence levels and attitudes to risk. While both types of training improved direction control, speed choice and visual search, along with number of hazards detected and actions in relation to hazards, statistically significant improvement on visual search was seen only after higher level skills training. Vehicle handling skills training significantly improved direction control and speed choice. In addition, confidence levels in their driving skills were significantly lowered and attitudes to speeding, overtaking and close following had improved significantly in the participants after the higher level driving skills training. The final aspect to this study was to examine the effects of the training over the following 6 month period based on self-reported driving behaviour. The response rate of participants however, was not sufficient to reach any meaningful conclusion on any long-term training effects. A pilot study using GPSbased data trackers to assess post-training driving behaviour revealed some promising results for future driver training evaluation studies. The overall implications of the results are discussed in relation to improving the safety of young drivers in New Zealand.

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