133 results for Report, 2010

  • Enhancing learning for engineering trade learners: Augmented paper-based materials in course design.

    Brown, C.; Glaeser, M.; Maathuis-Smith, S.; Mersham, G. M. (2010)

    Report
    Open Polytechnic

    This project tested the feasibility of embedding augmented reality targets, which could be viewed on computers using a simple webcam, into print material for second-year apprentice engineering trade learners at the Open Polytechnic. This would enable them to see the images in 3-D form, thus improving their learning experience. With augmented reality (AR) software the real-world image is augmented by virtual computer-generated imagery that is created when a webcam or camera-like device "reads" the target embedded in a page. The second-year apprentice engineering trade learners were chosen as a "test" group because they are generally kinaesthetic learners who don't always have access to the real-life artefacts they are studying. If this project was successful, further developments could be undertaken to enable augmented targets to be viewed via cellphones. Learners who view images of artefacts on a computer screen are able to rotate and enlarge them, as well as view them from different angles.

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  • Data for an Archaeozoological Analysis of Marine Resource Use in Two New Zealand Study Areas (Revised edition)

    Smith, Ian; James-Lee, Tiffany (2010-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Auckland DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Whanganui DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Lakes DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Northland (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Waikato (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Hutt Valley DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Counties Manukau (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Waitemata DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Bay of Plenty (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Midcentral DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Capital and Coast DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Taranaki (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The impacts of liquor outlets in Manukau City: Summary report

    Cameron, Michael Patrick; Cochrane, William; McNeill, Kellie; Melbourne, Pania; Morrison, Sandra L.; Robertson, Neville (2010-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    There has been significant recent debate over the impact of liquor outlets on communities in New Zealand. This report summarises the key results from a research project undertaken between 2008 and 2010. Media analysis and research with community stakeholders confirm that the issue is a focus of concern among communities in New Zealand. In Manukau City, off-licence liquor outlets tend to be located in areas of high social deprivation and high population density, while on-licence liquor outlets tend to be located in main centres and areas of high amenity value. Higher off-licence density is associated with lower alcohol prices and longer opening hours. The density of both off-licence and onlicence liquor outlets is associated with a range of social harms, including various police events and motor vehicle accidents. However, these results are context specific and care should be taken in applying them to other locations.

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  • Laptops for teachers: An evaluation of the TELA scheme in schools (Years 4 to 6)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann; Forret, Michael; McGee, Clive; Miller, Thelma (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this evaluation was to investigate the impacts of the Laptops for Teachers Scheme (referred to from here as the TELA scheme) on Years 4 to 6 teachers’ work over a period of three years (2004-2006) and to record emerging changes in laptop use. The investigation focused on the Ministry of Education expectation (Ministry of Education, 2004) that teacher access to a laptop for their individual professional use would lead to gains in confidence and expertise in the use of ICTs, to efficiencies in administration, would contribute to teacher collaboration and support the preparation of high quality lesson resources. It was also anticipated that teacher would use their laptop in the classroom for teaching and learning.

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