142 results for Report, 2011

  • Field-based early childhood teacher education : "but are they already teachers ...".

    Brennan, M.; Everiss, L.; Mara, D. (2011)

    Report
    Open Polytechnic

    Despite its long history in early childhood initial teacher education (ITE) programmes, there remains a limited research base about the nature of the field-based approach and more specifically student/tutor interactions in the tertiary classroom. This study adds to a growing area of scholarship that seeks to articulate a distinct pedagogical base to field-based teacher education. The tertiary classroom was chosen as the site of study because it affords researchers and teachers opportunity to place an intense focus on students and tutors 'doing field-based teacher education' and to explore new understandings that sit apart from traditional preservice ITE approaches.

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  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Otago and Southland (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Predicting the distribution of acid volatile sulfide in marine sediment from colour analysis of sediment-profile images

    Wilson, P; Vopel, K (2011-07-25)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a major concern worldwide. It is caused by an increase in the deposition of organic matter via terrestrial runoff (Gray et al. 2002) and aquaculture (Holmer & Kristensen 1994), or as a result of eutrophication driven by anthropogenic loading of coastal waters with phosphorus and nitrogen (Nixon 1995, Cloern 2001, Rosenberg et al. 2009). In coastal waters the majority of deposited organic carbon is mineralised by bacterial sulfate reduction because of the abundance of sulfate in the marine environement (Thode-Andersen & Jørgensen 1989, Bagarinao 1992). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced during sulfate reduction, reacts with dissolved iron or reactive iron minerals to form acid-extractable iron sulfides (termed acid volatile sulfide, AVS) that contribute to the distinct black colouration of organic-rich sediment. Although there is a strong relationship between sedimentary sulfide content and organic matter input, its measurement has not been used in routine monitoring because of its laborious nature. Bull and Williamson (2001) tested a new approach to predict the sediment AVS concentration from sediment images. The authors used film photography in a laboratory and found a weak linear correlation (R2 = 0.67) between sediment colour and AVS concentration.

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  • Lotteries literature review: final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides an overview of available literature relating to lotteries products, based on five specific question areas of focus: • To what extent do lotteries products in general and New Zealand lotteries products in particular appeal to problem and under-age gamblers? Do someproducts appeal more than others and, if so, can this be described? • What policies, programmes, codes of practice and corporate social responsibility guidelines have other lotteries adopted and is there any evidence about the impact these have had on problem and under-age gamblers? • What other lotteries have made existing or new products available on the internet or via electronic media and what impact, if any, have these had on problem and under-age gambling? • What is the role of lotteries marketing in shaping people’s views on participating in lotteries and about gambling in general? • What education programmes or materials have been developed to educate gamblers about responsible gambling and are there examples of ‘good practice’ in this area? The review was commissioned by the New Zealand Lotteries Commission in order that research gaps could be identified and recommendations made for research that the New Zealand Lotteries Commission could potentially contract. The review consisted of an extensive search of library and other electronic databases, personal specialist collections and grey literature. Professional and personal networks were also drawn on to locate unpublished reports and more especially, organisational documents relating to social responsibility and/or educational programmes and materials that might otherwise not have been easily accessible via the public domain. Relevant documentation was accessed and critically reviewed. Background and contextual information is provided in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 outlines the methodology used. The literature review (Chapter 3) comprises the main body of the report and is followed by the conclusion (Chapter 4), identified research gaps (Chapter 5) and recommendations for research (Chapter 6). Key points from the review follow, grouped under the five questions areas of focus.

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  • Problem gambling assessment and screening instruments: phase one final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M; Volberg, R; Garrett, N; Coombes, R (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Objectives: This project was commissioned by the Problem Gambling Committee (PGC); subsequently the Ministry of Health assumed responsibility from the PGC. The primary objectives of the project were to: 1. Review the assessment and screening instruments currently used in New Zealand and internationally for the assessment of problem gamblers at the clinical level including by the telephone helpline 2. Following the review, to recommend a full set of screening and assessment instruments to be used in the clinical treatment of problem gamblers; selected instruments will be able to be used to monitor client progress in follow-up assessments currently undertaken at six monthly intervals 3. To pilot the recommended screening and assessment instruments in order to test the application of these screens in the New Zealand setting The research was divided into two phases. There was a particular focus on the screening instruments currently mandated for use by Ministry of Health funded problem gambling service providers, namely the South Oaks Gambling Screen - Three Month time frame (SOGS-3M), DSM-IV gambling criteria, Dollars Lost assessment and Control over Gambling assessment. Other screening tools used by the service providers were also considered. Additionally, the family/whanau checklist was reviewed.

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  • Formative investigation into the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes in New Zealand

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Exclusion of patrons from gambling venues is potentially an effective early intervention for minimising harm from excessive gambling since it may contribute to the treatment and/or recovery of people with developing and established gambling problems. Internationally, some jurisdictional regulations mandate „imposed exclusion‟ programmes, where gamblers with problems are identified by venue staff (usually casinos) and barred from gambling at those venues. In other jurisdictions, „self-exclusion‟ programmes are in place, where gamblers may request that they be banned from the venue, removed from its mailing list and potentially face legal consequences if they re-enter the premises. Traditionally, such self-exclusion programmes have been operated by casinos but increasingly are being required for clubs and pubs where electronic gaming machines are located. In New Zealand, The Gambling Act 2003 stipulates that both imposed- and self- exclusion measures should be operated. The Act refers to these exclusion measures as an "order‟ but colloquial use of the term "contract‟ has been used throughout this report due to the word usage amongst participants in this research and in the literature. However, there is a paucity of research regarding the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes per se and even less information outside the casino environment. In addition, the effectiveness of the particular processes in force in New Zealand has not been evaluated. Currently, different processes are operated by different venues, for example with variations in minimum and maximum exclusion periods, and different requirements for re-entering the gambling venue when an exclusion contract comes to an end. Given that exclusion programmes consume private and public resources and are a legislated requirement, it is important that their effectiveness be ascertained. This will have substantial implications in terms of the potential to improve existing processes to ensure maximum minimisation of harms from gambling. In August 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Formative investigation into the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes in New Zealand. The purpose of this project was two-fold: a) to ascertain the most suitable methodology and processes for researching venue excluders in order to robustly evaluate the effectiveness of current venue exclusion processes, and b) to gain some initial insight into the effectiveness of gambling (particularly electronic gaming machine and casino) venue exclusion processes in New Zealand.

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  • Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services: stage three final report

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Garrett, N; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Ministry of Health is responsible for the funding and coordination of problem gambling services and activities in New Zealand. This includes the funding of a national telephone helpline, two national face-to-face counselling services and several regional treatment providers which include Maori and Pacific specific services (Asian specific services are provided as a division of one of the national face-to-face treatment providers) (Ministry of Health, 2008a). From 2008, the Ministry of Health funded face-to-face problem gambling treatment providers have received specific training around the Ministry of Health expectations for service practice requirements (e.g. the types of intervention that will be funded and the processes expected within those interventions as well as for referrals for co-existing issues), and expectations around data collection, management and information submission to the Ministry of Health. The Ministry of Health has also identified specific sets of screening instruments to be used with clients, which vary depending on whether the client is receiving a Brief or Full-length intervention, or is a problem gambler or family/whanau member („significant other‟) of a gambler. These screening instruments came into use in 2008, with different sets of instruments having been used previously. At the present time, the effectiveness of the current problem gambling treatment services is largely unknown, as is the optimal intervention process for different types of client. Whilst this sort of information can ultimately only be ascertained through rigorously conducted effectiveness studies (randomised controlled trials) (Westphal & Abbott, 2006), an evaluation (process, impact and outcome) of services could provide indications as to optimal treatment pathways and approaches for problem gamblers and affected others, as well as identifying successful strategies currently in existence nationally and internationally and areas for improvement in current service provision. In September 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services. This project was to focus on four priority areas: 1.) Review and analysis of national service statistics and client data to inform workforce development, evaluation of the Ministry of Health systems and processes, and other related aspects 2.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the effect of different pathways to problem gambling services on client outcomes and delivery 3.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of distinct intervention services 4.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the roll-out and implementation of Facilitation Services2

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  • Kaipatiki project environment centre: project analysis

    Douglas, C; Ryoo, Y; Davis, M (2011-10-13)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Kaipatiki Project

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  • The role of academic literacy in post-graduate hospitality education

    Strauss, P; Goodsir, W (2011-10-31)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Staff and students in the School of Hospitality and Tourism at AUT, and practitioners working in a number of hotels in Auckland, participated in a project investigating the role of academic literacy in postgraduate hospitality study. The project investigated stakeholders‟ perceptions as to what they regarded as appropriate standards of literacy and how challenges in this area could be addressed. First language speakers of English (L1) were overrepresented in the student cohort, yet even among this group it was apparent that academic writing was problematic. As well as linguistic and structuring difficulties, it appeared that the educational practices many had experienced in their undergraduate studies had not equipped them to communicate effectively in writing at this level. Lecturers were concerned about the lowly status accorded to Hospitality in the academic world. It was a matter of concern that hospitality students, particularly at postgraduate level, be judged as the equal of their peers in other fields. While they shared a concern about students‟ ability to write effectively they were divided as to how the competing discourses of the academy and the industry should be managed. The practitioners were concerned that hospitality education at university level was not sufficiently practical. They did not feel that students‟ ability to write effectively was a major concern although they did want graduates to produce clear, succinct texts. In this research suggestions have been made as to how these tensions might be addressed by the academic community. These include acknowledging the changing face of tertiary education and considering a more flexible approach to student writing; providing embedded discipline-specific academic literacy support utilising a team teaching approach with an EAP (English for academic purposes) practitioner; pursuing various feedback options on draft writing and acknowledging that writing skills are a „work in progress‟

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  • The effects of adult involvement on children participating in organised team sports

    Walters, SR; Schluter, P; Thomson, R; Payne, D (2011-10-21)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    There are clearly identified social, physical, and mental health benefits of physical activity in primary aged children. With an unequivocal link between sport and physical activity, it would appear to be fundamentally important that children are encouraged to participate in sporting activities. Parents and coaches have been acknowledged as key influences in their children‟s uptake, enjoyment, and ongoing participation in sport. However, concerns have been commonly expressed in the media, both in New Zealand and internationally, about inappropriate sideline behaviour displayed by adults at children‟s sporting events. In spite of this, few studies have examined the nature and effect of parental or coaching behaviour at children‟s sporting events. In addition, although young children‟s views are increasingly becoming seen to be important, relevant and valuable, there is no evidence in the peer-reviewed literature of New Zealand based research that has been undertaken with children in this area. Using a scientifically robust epidemiological design and observation instrument, a key aim of this research was to benchmark the prevalence of various coaching behaviours at children‟s (aged 6 to 11 years) events for four major sports (rugby union, touch rugby, soccer, and netball). Utilising a mixed-methods approach, another key aim of this research was to give voice to sporting administrators, parents, children, referees/umpires, and coaches about the effects of parental behaviours at children‟s sporting fixtures. The findings presented in this study provide prevalence and patterns of verbal coach behaviour from 72 sporting fixtures not previously recorded in New Zealand. In total, 10,697 coach comments were recorded at, on average, 3.71 (95% CI: 3.64, 3.79) comments/minute. The coaching behaviours recorded did not always reflect a nurturing, positive, developmentally-appropriate approach to the coaching of children‟s team sports. Of the total number of comments recorded, 35.4% were categorised as positive, xii 21.6% as negative, and 43% as neutral. Significant differences in the distribution of comments were found between sports, with rugby union coaches recording the lowest percentage of positive comments and the highest percentage of negative comments. The percentage of negative comments aimed at umpires and officials was higher in touch rugby and in rugby union than in netball and soccer. The discursive analysis employed in this study revealed the dominance of a sport as competition discourse that would appear to serve the needs more of over-competitive coaches and parents than the needs of children. For children, being treated equally and fairly is a primary concern. Children enjoy competition, but appear to be able to put winning into perspective. There is pressure on children, through disciplinary measures, to conform to the normative behaviours associated with an adult-controlled version of sport. The results of this research provide an evidence-base to inform policy and the development of interventions with regions and nationally; evidence which may also be applicable to other developed countries. Until a child-centred approach to coaching is routinely adopted across all sports, the sometimes extremely negative perceptions of children‟s sport will remain.

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  • FSL-RFG(Maleimide) FSL construction kit

    Henry, SM; Rodionov, I (2011-10-12)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The FSL-RFG(Maleimide) FSL Construction Kit is for use in creating Function-Spacer-Lipid (FSL) constructs for use in non-covalent cell-surface modification/engineering of cellular membranes, viral particles, liposomes, or other surfaces [1-10]. FSL-RFG(Mal) is one of several FSL constructs with Reactive Functional Groups (RFG); with this construct having maleimide as its Function group. The semi-rigid Spacer in this molecule is constructed via modified hexapeptide unit (Gly-Gly-Ida)2 coupling to both amino groups of ethylenediamine and has been designed to ensure accessibility for target binding/external interactions and proper presentation of functional peptides at a cell or virion surface as well as imparting good solubility to the construct. Electrostatic repulsion forces of spacer’s anionic groups probably favor uniform distribution of the incorporated constructs on the membrane surface [11]. The diacyl phospholipid derived from unsaturated fatty acids is a prerequisite for spontaneous incorporation into cell membranes. This FSL-RFG(Maleimide) FSL Construction Kit cat # 960819-1-R&D (includes a detailed procedure and contains reagents sufficient for one FSL preparation on a milligram scale from cysteine-containing peptides (Figure 1), proteins or any other thiols of biological interest. The effective synthetic approach is based on the well-known Michael nucleophilic addition to maleimides, which react fast and selectively with SH-groups in the pH range 6.5-7.5 producing stable thioether linkages completely stable at physiological conditions [12-15]. The reaction half-life between millimolar concentrations of maleimide and thiol is estimated to be of the order of few seconds [14,15]; but more complex and heavy molecules of biochemical interest interact somewhat slower even when applied in 10-fold excess and durations of at least 2 hours are recommended [16]. The protocol described here is optimized for this kit using FSL-RFG(Mal) with generic peptides and addresses problems which may be encountered if purification of completed FSL constructs is required.

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