96 results for Report, 2012

  • Extended Baseline Report: Graduate Longitudinal Study

    Tustin, Karen; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Taylor, Nicola; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Hunter, Jackie; Harold, Gordon; Poulton, Richie (2012-04-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability Programme: The Design of A Longitudinal and Transdisciplinary Study of Agricultural Sustainability in New Zealand

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John; Manhire, Jon; Saunders, Caroline; Moller, Henrik; Reid, John; Benge, Jayson; Blackwell, Grant; Carey, Peter; Emanuelsson, Martin; Greer, Glen; Hunt, Lesley; Lucock, Dave; Rosin, Chris; Norton, David; McLeod, Catriona; Knight, Benjamin (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report provides an overview of the key design features of the Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability (ARGOS) programme. This ongoing long-term research project started in 2003, involving a group of around 20 social scientists, ecologists, economists, and farm management experts in New Zealand. The overarching mission of ARGOS is to understand the enablers and barriers to the sustainability and resilience of agriculture, so as to enhance New Zealand’s economic, social and environmental wellbeing. To achieve this mission, the ARGOS team has designed and implemented a well-replicated and long-term programme of longitudinal research on more than 100 whole working farms, across different agricultural sectors, comparing a wide range of variables between three different farming systems: conventional, integrated management (IM) and organic. The first funded phase of this research programme has taken a systems and transdisciplinary approach, with an emphasis on statistical rigour and standardisation of methods, structured around the basic null hypothesis that there are no differences between the three farming systems. The primary focus of this approach is to examine the efficacy of alternative quality assurance (QA) schemes in delivering sustainable outcomes. This working paper seeks to inform potential collaborators and other interested parties about the way the ARGOS research programme has been structured, and to describe the rationale for this design. To this end, the report first documents the formation of the ARGOS group and the development of the aims and basic features of the design of the first funded phase of the research programme. The process of selection of agricultural sectors and individual farms within those sectors is described, along with the rationale behind this selection process. We then describe the key objectives of the research programme, and the way these were approached by research teams from different disciplines. The importance of transdisciplinarity is then discussed, providing insight into the associated benefits and pitfalls, and the lessons that were learned in the process of designing and implementing a transdisciplinary research programme. Finally, we discuss a number of issues surrounding the key features of our study design, evaluating their respective benefits and costs, and describe the future research directions suggested by the findings of the first phase of the programme.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBs (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the South Island (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Southern District Health Board (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Auckland economy: situation and forecast, November 2009

    Nana, G; Sanderson, K; Leung-Wai, J; Shirley, I; Wilson, D; Neill, CM; Slack, A; Stokes, F; Norman, D; Lynn, A (2012-01-27)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    BERL and the Institute of Public Policy at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) have combined to pull together an economic forecast for the Auckland region economy. Latest employment data released last week confirm that the much-heralded end of the recession remains little more than a technicality. This is as true for the Auckland economy as it is for its national counterpart. The net 13,000 jobs shed from the Auckland economy over the past year mean annual employment contracted by nearly 3 percent over that period. Looking ahead, hopes of an export-led recovery for the New Zealand economy have been dashed by an exchange rate that defies any rational assessment of the fundamentals. Consequently, the short-term outlook for the Auckland economy is best described as unstable. Clearly, the next few months will be better than the first half of 2009, but there will be little to celebrate. We forecast: a sombre export picture for manufacturing; modest, at best, employment growth; a subdued outlook for retail trade; import growth slightly above national; net inward migration gains; moderate house price growth; growth in house building activity; guest nights treading water.

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  • Science in the New Zealand Curriculum e-in-science

    Buntting, Catherine Michelle; MacIntyre, Bill; Falloon, Garry; Cosslett, Graeme; Forret, Michael (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This milestone report explores some innovative possibilities for e-in-science practice to enhance teacher capability and increase student engagement and achievement. In particular, this report gives insights into how e-learning might be harnessed to help create a future-oriented science education programme. “Innovative” practices are considered to be those that integrate (or could integrate) digital technologies in science education in ways that are not yet commonplace. “Future-oriented education” refers to the type of education that students in the “knowledge age” are going to need. While it is not yet clear exactly what this type of education might look like, it is clear that it will be different from the current system. One framework used to differentiate between these kinds of education is the evolution of education from Education 1.0 to Education 2.0 and 3.0 (Keats & Schmidt, 2007). Education 1.0, like Web 1.0, is considered to be largely a one-way process. Students “get” knowledge from their teachers or other information sources. Education 2.0, as defined by Keats and Schmidt, happens when Web 2.0 technologies are used to enhance traditional approaches to education. New interactive media, such as blogs, social bookmarking, etc. are used, but the process of education itself does not differ significantly from Education 1.0. Education 3.0, by contrast, is characterised by rich, cross-institutional, cross-cultural educational opportunities. The learners themselves play a key role as creators of knowledge artefacts, and distinctions between artefacts, people and processes become blurred, as do distinctions of space and time. Across these three “generations”, the teacher’s role changes from one of knowledge source (Education 1.0) to guide and knowledge source (Education 2.0) to orchestrator of collaborative knowledge creation (Education 3.0). The nature of the learner’s participation in the learning also changes from being largely passive to becoming increasingly active: the learner co-creates resources and opportunities and has a strong sense of ownership of his or her own education. In addition, the participation by communities outside the traditional education system increases. Building from this framework, we offer our own “framework for future-oriented science education” (see Figure 1). In this framework, we present two continua: one reflects the nature of student participation (from minimal to transformative) and the other reflects the nature of community participation (also from minimal to transformative). Both continua stretch from minimal to transformative participation. Minimal participation reflects little or no input by the student/community into the direction of the learning—what is learned, how it is learned and how what is learned will be assessed. Transformative participation, in contrast, represents education where the student or community drives the direction of the learning, including making decisions about content, learning approaches and assessment.

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  • Sensory modulation in Acute Mental Health wards: a qualitative study of staff and service user perspectives

    Sutton, D; Nicholson, E (2012-06-01)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The goal of reducing seclusion and restraint in acute mental health services has resulted in the exploration of alternative methods for managing agitated and aggressive behaviour (OHagan, 2006). Sensory modulation intervention has been identified as a potential alternative to more coercive practices by supporting service users to self-regulate when distressed or agitated within acute mental health settings. The approach utilises sensory based equipment, strategies and environments to assist people in optimizing arousal levels and engagement in everyday life. This is an emerging approach within mental health care and there is a need for further research to support its development and application, and provide evidence of its efficacy. The purpose of the research outlined in this report was to explore the feasibility of using sensory interventions in acute psychiatric services with the specific aims of: • Understanding service users’ experience of using sensory modulation as a tool for the de-escalation of arousal. • Exploring staff member perspectives of using sensory modulation as an intervention for the de-escalation of arousal. • To identify specific facilitators and barriers to implementing sensory modulation interventions in acute mental health wards. The qualitative data reported in this document was gathered through service user and staff focus groups and individual interviews. Thematic analysis of the data provided insights into the process and outcomes of sensory modulation practice. The findings suggest that sensory interventions are viewed by both staff and service users as being effective in modulating arousal and promoting de-escalation. Three key outcomes of sensory modulation were identified in the participant accounts, all of which support de-escalation of arousal: • Sensory modulation was perceived as an effective tool for inducing a calm state in the majority of people that used it. • Sensory modulation supported the rapid building of trust and rapport for both service users and staff members. • Sensory modulation facilitated the development of service users’ self-management, increasing their awareness and ability to regulate their own arousal levels. In addition to these intervention outcomes, the findings shed light on the process of sensory modulation and specifically the mechanisms that support the above outcomes. Seven aspects of the intervention were noted as being significant in the participant accounts: • Creating a sense of safety • Soothing through the sensory input • Distracting attention from distressing thoughts, emotions and perceptions • Stabilising or ‘grounding’ through the sensory input • Creating positive associations • Creating a sense of control • Supporting expression and release of thoughts, emotion and energy. These mechanisms interacted in a dynamic process as service users shifted their attention to their bodies and immediate environment, and engaged in a whole sensory experience created by the room, equipment and the supportive presence of a staff member. The findings also highlighted important considerations in implementing the sensory modulation approach; including the set up of the room and use of specific equipment, how staff members can best support service users to access and benefit from the intervention and what organisations need to consider when developing and maintaining a sensory approach within an inpatient service. Overall, participant responses reflected a high level of acceptability and a belief in the efficacy of the intervention. However, sensory modulation must be seen as one component of organisational change process if it is to have an impact on seclusion and restraint rates. Attention needs to be given to relevant policies, leadership and training if the intervention is to be used effectively as a routine and effective addition to practice.

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  • Pasifika youth in South Auckland: family, community, gangs, culture, leadership and the future

    Nakhid, C; Collins, E; Tanielu, R (2012-06-13)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pasifika youth make a significant impact on the demographic profile of South Auckland and are a major focus of the many projections regarding population, employment and education in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The place of family and community is regarded as an important influence on the future of Pasifika youth yet how these youth view the place of Pasifika families in the future is not adequately covered in the research literature. As more Pasifika youth are thought to be joining gangs, there are also concerns as to whether the gangs have replaced the family for Pasifika youth and whether the street has become home to these youth.

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  • HYBRIDJOIN for Near Real-time Data Warehousing

    Naeem, M; Dobbie, G; Weber, G (2012-04-26)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In order to make timely and effective decisions, businesses need the latest information from data warehouse repositories. To keep these repositories up-to-date with respect to the end user updates, near real-time data integration is required. An important phase in near real-time data integration is data transformation where the stream of updates is joined with disk-based master data. The stream-based algorithm, Hybrid Join (HYBRIDJOIN), performs well in general but has not been optimized for real world conditions. In real world market economics, a few products are sold more frequently as compared to the rest of the products; therefore, a large number of sale transactions relate to a small portion of master data. In the transformation phase, to join the input stream of sales transactions with disk-based master data, HYBRIDJOIN loads that particular part of master data each time from the disk, increasing the disk access cost significantly with a negative effect on performance. Contrarily, X-HYBRIDJOIN stores that particular part of master data in memory permanently, eliminating the disk access overhead significantly. To validate the arguments and analyze the performance of X-HYBRIDJOIN an experimental study is conducted.

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  • Environmental effects of the Manganui ski field, Mt Taranaki/Egmont

    Efford, Jackson Tai; Bylsma, Rebecca Johanna; Clarkson, Bruce D. (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    During May 2012, the environmental effects of the Manganui ski field were examined. Permanent quadrats first established in 1974 to monitor vegetation changes were re-measured, vegetation mapping was conducted, modifications to ground form and drainage were identified, soil compaction was examined, and stream water from the ski field catchment was tested for nutrient enrichment. This report focusses primarily on the lower Manganui ski field, as the upper Manganui ski field consists mostly of unmodified herbfield or gravelfield, protected by a sufficient snow base over the winter months. The lower Manganui ski field has a long history of modification spanning from the early 1900s. Vegetation types mapped on the lower field included unmown tussockfield, mown tussock-herbfield, shrubland and exotics. The re-measurement of vegetation in permanent quadrats on the lower field suggests that since the last re-measurement in 1994, several exotic species have increased in cover, including Carex ovalis, Poa annua, and Agrostis capillaris (percentage cover increases of up to 46.6%, 42.0% and 20.7% respectively). Vegetation mapping and historic photographs indicate that the lower ski field sits within the elevational belt of shrubland vegetation, little of which remains due to regular mowing conducted on the field since 1947. Shrubs which have been largely excluded from the field through mowing include Brachyglottis elaeagnifolius, Hebe odora, Ozothamnus vauvilliersii, Dracophyllum filifolium, Pseudopanax colensoi, Raukaua simplex and Hebe stricta var. egmontiana. Areas of the ski field dominated by exotic vegetation were predominantly associated with historic culvert construction and rock dynamiting. Compaction by machinery was confined to the sensitive mossfield area at the base of the lower field.

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  • Evaluation of the Hamilton City Council plants for Gullies programme

    Clarkson, Bruce D.; Clarkson, Fiona Marie; Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This evaluation found that the Hamilton City Council Plants for Gullies programme is successfully facilitating the restoration and enhancement of Hamilton City gullies by private gully owners. The mean number of native species in surveyed gullies was 2.1 in non-restored sites and 18.4 in restored sites. While the mean number of invasive species was 4.1 in non-restored sites to 2.6 in restored sites. This quantitative measure is a valuable indication of the ecosystem gains for Hamilton City. Hamilton gully owners are very satisfied with the Plants for Gullies programme; the mean satisfaction rating was 8.9 out of 10. These residents dedicate significant time and energy to restoring their gully sections; the mean time contribution of survey participants was 10.3 hours per month. Gully owners were found to be utilising knowledge acquired through participation in the programme to add valuable diversity to their gully ecosystems. This was repeatedly demonstrated by programme participants not only reintroducing the native plants supplied by the programme but also adding large quantities of privately-sourced plants. This investigation found that the Plants for Gullies and Gully Restoration programmes are effective in communicating key ecological restoration concepts. This was reflected by gully owner prioritisation of eco-sourcing, biodiversity and weed control as considerations in their restoration projects. The Gully Restoration Guide was found to be the most valuable component of the programme’s educational tools. However, it is recommended that this resource is updated to support the many gully owners who require information for advanced stages of ecological restoration. In summary, the Plants for Gullies programme is successfully delivering gully restoration assistance and advice to gully owners, which is resulting in significant improvements to Hamilton City’s gully systems. The programme is valued by all who are involved and could be recommended to other New Zealand cities as an effective model for environmental restoration and community engagement.

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  • Ecological study of Hickford Park and coastal walkway route options

    Bylsma, Rebecca Johanna; Efford, Jackson Tai (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    An ecological study of Hickford Park, (New Plymouth) was conducted by the Environmental Research Institute, University of Waikato, for the New Plymouth District Council. The main ecological features of the park were mapped and described and recommendations were made for the future management of the site. Hickford Park encompasses significant wetland habitat (Waipu Lagoons and oxidation ponds), sections of planted native species, an extensive duneland system, exotic plantation forest, grazed pasture, sports playing fields and the recently completed Taranaki Velodrome. The Waipu Lagoons represent a rare coastal lagoon ecosystem type in Taranaki, and host a diverse range of native wetland flora and fauna. The acclaimed coastal walkway currently extends half way through Hickford Park to St Andrews Drive. The environmental impacts of several proposed routes for the extension of the coastal walkway through the remainder of the park to Bell Block beach were assessed and recommendations made for the preferred route from an ecological perspective. In summary: • Indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna should not be disturbed if an alternative option is available. Possible ecological impacts of the walkway development may include removal of native vegetation, impact on dune system, alteration to land contours and slope, soil disturbance and sediment input to waterways. • Construction of the coastal walkway along the originally proposed route option (1.1) would require both vegetation removal and re-contouring and would result in a decrease or degradation of natural dune habitat. • Route option 1.2 appears to be the most feasible option, as the Waitara sewer line has previously been installed in the same location and no vegetation removal would be required. • Route options 1.2, 1.3 and the proposed walkway links, provide an opportunity to enhance the public’s appreciation of the ecology within Hickford Park. • In all cases, the ecological effects of the preferred walkway route should be offset via enhancement and restoration plantings.

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  • Infinite dimensional mixed economies with asymmetric information

    Bhowmik, A; Cao, J (2012-01-11)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we study asymmetric information economies consisting of both non-negligible and negligible agents and having ordered Banach spaces as their commodity spaces. In answering a question of Hervés-Beloso and Moreno-García in [17], we establish a characterization of Walrasian expectations allocations by the veto power of the grand coalition. It is also shown that when an economy contains only negligible agents a Vind's type theorem on the private core with the exact feasibility can be restored. This solves a problem of Pesce in [20].

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