2,304 results for Report

  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results (including Maori ethnicity results)

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2017-05-24)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Abstract: Researchers at the University of Otago are ambivalent about Open Access: in principle they strongly support open access to research literature but their behaviours are driven by the practicalities of cost and publication venue. This document reports the results of a survey carried out in 2015 of University of Otago researchers as to their attitudes towards and behaviours in relation to open access publishing. This version of the report includes a sub-analysis of respondents who selected Maori ethnicity. The original version of the report without this sub-analysis is available via OUR Archive at http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6947 The project page for more information, such as the questions used and the anonymised raw data, is available at https://figshare.com/projects/University_of_Otago_Open_Access_Publishing_Survey_2015-16/17216

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  • Boat electrofishing of the Waikato River upstream and downstream of the Huntly Power Station: spring 2010

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Baker, Cindy F.; Tana, Raymond; Powrie, Warrick; Bell, Dudley G. (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate fish abundance and community composition upstream and downstream of the Huntly Power Station discharge by boat electrofishing in order to contribute to effects assessment of the thermal discharge. This limited sampling suggests that koi carp had the greatest biomass of any fish species, and were aggregated immediately downstream of the Huntly Power Station. Previous work would suggest that a single electrofishing pass catches about half of the fish present. The method is known to under-sample eels and catfish, but is a robust semiquantitative tool to estimate relative fish abundance.

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  • CoRe: A way to build pedagogical content knowledge for beginning teachers

    Eames, Chris W.; Williams, P. John; Hume, Anne Christine; Lockley, John (2011)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Research has shown that one of the factors which enables teachers to be effective is their rich pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Beginning teachers need support to develop this PCK and recent research in the field has proposed a conceptual tool known as “content representations”, or CoRes, as a model for doing this. The study reported here brought together science and technology experts in content and pedagogy, early career secondary teachers, and researchers to design a CoRe to assist development of teacher PCK. The study then researched the early career teachers’ use of the CoRe in their planning and delivery of a unit in their classrooms to examine the effect of the CoRe on teaching and learning, and on the development of the teachers’ PCK.

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  • Assessment of HIVS/AIDS services in New Mexico

    Oetzel, John G.; Hill, Ricky; Archiopoli, Ashley; Avila, Magdalena; Muhammad, Michael; Wilcox, Bryan; Hammond, Kayla (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of services provided at the six federallyfunded clinics for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). The Ryan White CARE Act Needs Assessment Guide outlines five key components to the scope of work: (1) Assessment of service needs among affected populations; (2) Profile of provider capacity and capability; (3) Resource inventory; (4) Epidemiologic profile; and (5)Assessment of unmet need and service gaps. This report provides information on each of the five areas with much greater emphasis on the first two components.

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  • Cyclical labour market adjustment in New Zealand: The response of firms to the global financial crisis and its implications for workers, Motu Working Paper 12-04

    Fabling, Richard; Maré, David C. (2012-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This paper examines the dynamics of employment adjustment in New Zealand, focusing on the response of firms to the 2008/09 Global Financial Crisis. We use data from Statistics New Zealand’s prototype Longitudinal Business Database (LBD) to examine firms’ employment responses to output shocks before and after the crisis, and to investigate variations in job and worker flows. We discuss the resilience of the NZ labour market to economic shocks, and the possible role of labour market policy settings. Finally, we discuss preliminary findings on the differential impact of labour market adjustment on workers – by earnings level, age, gender, and tenure – and outline potential further work along these lines. Our analysis of firm microdata highlights three key features of New Zealand labour market adjustment to the 2008/09 crisis. First, there was considerable heterogeneity across firms, both before and after the crisis, in the size of output shocks that firms faced, the amount of employment adjustment in response to any given output shock, and in the size of worker flows given the firm’s employment adjustment. Second, the crisis not only moved the distribution of output shocks faced by firms, but also altered the relationship between output shocks and changes in job and worker flows and employment. Third, the impact of the observed firm-level dynamics had an uneven impact on workers, with greater employment losses for low wage workers, young workers, and workers with low job tenure.

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  • Shoreline changes for southeastern Matakana Island (Panepane Point) following capital dredging (2015-16)

    de Lange, Willem P.; Moon, Vicki G. (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Surveys of the mean high water mark before and after the capital dredging of 2015/16 indicate minor shoreline fluctuations on the open coast of Matakana Island that are consistent with normal variations. The largest change has occurred at the Panepane Point spit tip, which eroded by ˜20 m between August 2015 and October 2016. This is most likely due to the changed alignment of the channels approaching the narrowest section of the tidal inlet, and is consistent with the predicted impacts in the Assessment of Environmental Impacts. Panepane Point is not expected to continue to erode further with the current channel alignment. The patterns of erosion and accretion observed for the ebb tidal delta (Matakana Banks) since the dredging are consistent with those reported before dredging, and are associated with the migration of swash bars over the swash platform of the delta in response to normal variations in wave and tidal currents. These is some evidence to suggest that the ebb tidal delta is starting to extend further offshore. The observed changes do not indicate that the ebb tidal delta is undergoing collapse following dredging. The patterns of erosion and accretion observed in the Lower Western Channel are consistent with channel migrations observed in the past, superimposed on continuing shoaling of the ebb shield of the flood tidal delta (Centre Bank). The contribution of dredging to this behaviour is currently being investigated.

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  • Invasive fish survey of Lake Arapuni by boat electrofishing

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Powrie, Warrick; Kim, Brian (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A boat electrofishing survey of Lake Arapuni was conducted on 2 February 2017 by the University of Waikato to investigate anecdotal reports of koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) presence in the lake. Nine 10-minute electrofishing transects were conducted around the littoral zone of the lake. This resulted in a total distance fished of 3.35 km and a total area fished of 1.34 ha. A total of 100 fish were captured, comprising three species: brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebu/osus), goldfish {Carassius auratus) and rudd {Scardinius erythrophthalmus); in addition, eels (Anguilla sp.) were observed but not captured. Total captured fish biomass was 14.8 kg {11. 7 kg/ha) with goldfish being the most abundant species (86 individuals), accounting for most of the biomass (86.8%). Rudd were the next most abundant species with nine individuals captured (1.0 kg/ha) followed by catfish (five individuals; 0.4 kg/ha). Rudd and catfish boat electrofishing biomass estimates should be regarded as minimal as capture rates for benthic species (catfish) and juveniles (rudd) are often lower than those of adult pelagic species. The reduced capture efficiency of benthic species is due to their preference for depths beyond the extent of the electrofishing field (approximately 2 m in extent from the anode), in addition benthic species are more likely to be missed by netters due to their reduced visibility. The smaller size (150 mm FL), many of which were highly coloured and had markings similar to those of koi carp. It is likely that these larger coloured goldfish were mistaken for koi carp in previous sightings, especially as adult goldfish form small aggregations similar to those of koi carp. If koi carp are present in Lake Arapuni they are likely to be at biomass levels too low to mount viable control or eradication programmes given the large area and depth of the lake.

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  • Threshold concepts: Impacts on teaching and learning at tertiary level

    Peter, Mira; Harlow, Ann; Scott, Jonathan B.; McKie, David; Johnson, E. Marcia; Moffat, Kirstine; McKim, Anne M. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This project explored teaching and learning of hard-to-learn threshold concepts in first-year English, an electrical engineering course, leadership courses, and in doctoral writing. The project was envisioned to produce disciplinary case studies that lecturers could use to reflect on and refine their curriculum and pedagogy, thereby contributing to discussion about the relationship between theory and methodology in higher education research (Shay, Ashwin, & Case, 2009). A team of seven academics investigated lecturers’ awareness and emergent knowledge of threshold concepts and associated pedagogies and how such pedagogies can afford opportunities for learning. As part of this examination the lecturers also explored the role of threshold concept theory in designing curricula and sought to find the commonalities in threshold concepts and their teaching and learning across the four disciplines. The research highlights new ways of teaching threshold concepts to help students learn concepts that are fundamental to the disciplines they are studying and expand their educational experiences. Given that much of the international research in this field focuses on the identification of threshold concepts and debates their characteristics (Barradell, 2013; Flanagan, 2014; Knight, Callaghan, Baldock, & Meyer, 2013), our exploration of what happens when lecturers use threshold concept theory to re-envision their curriculum and teaching helps to address a gap within the field. By addressing an important theoretical and practical approach the project makes a considerable contribution to teaching and learning at the tertiary level in general and to each discipline in particular.

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  • Scootering on: An investigation of children’s use of scooters for transport and recreation

    Wolfaardt, Trish; Campbell, Maxine M. (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Non-motorised scooters have increased significantly in popularity over the last few years in New Zealand, following similar trends in the US, Australia, Canada and Europe. Non-motorised scooters are an important source of recreation, transport and exercise and children of all ages enjoy riding them to and from school and in skate parks. Along with the increase in popularity and use of the scooters, New Zealand is also experiencing a considerable increase in the numbers of injuries to children, with a notable spike in ACC claims in the 2011-12 year. Whilst most of the injuries are moderate – dislocations, fractures, lacerations and soft-tissue injuries – an increase in the number of severe injuries, and at times, even fatalities is also evident. Boys tend to be injured more frequently than girls and the median age for injury is nine years. Most injuries occur at home, with public roads the next most likely location. International literature shows similar trends world-wide. Numbers of scooter injuries are escalating and an intervention to minimise harm and reduce risk is considered imperative in all regions. The evidence shows that children are not wearing protective equipment (such as helmets) when travelling on a non-motorised scooter and there is no legal requirement for them to do so. Elbow and knee pads – and even footwear – were conspicuously absent amongst children observed in fieldwork undertaken for this project. Children routinely use basic scooters for activities unsuited to their design and on terrain that poses further risks. It was also evident that children scootering to school were not subject to the same regulations as those cycling to school and there appears to be a general lack of awareness of the risks associated with scootering. We therefore propose the following recommendations as means by which we might minimise the risks and reduce harm to children: o Amend the current cycle helmet legislation to include the riders of all wheeled recreational devices, irrespective of the age of the rider; o Introduce school policies requiring that helmets and footwear are worn when scootering to and from school; o Implement a minimum age for scootering to and from school; o Extend the coverage of existing school training programmes on road safety in general and safe scootering in particular; o Require compulsory distribution of point-of-sale information packs on the risks of scooters and the protective equipment options available; o Ensure continued funding of current community resources and training initiatives o Further research on scooter accidents and associated risk factors

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  • Accidental child driveway runovers: Exploring Waikato data and the efficacy of existing responses

    Hunter, John; Poulgrain, Hayley Mills; Campbell, Maxine M. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    While the numbers of accidents are not high, there is little doubt that driveway runovers are an ongoing, often fatal and inevitably avoidable tragedy for children and their families. In many cases the driver is an immediate family member, or a neighbour or friend, which serves to compound the tragedy. This type of accident is, like other unintentional child injuries, preventable. The over-riding objective of this study is to find ways to minimise the incidence and severity of driveway runovers. We also aim to add Waikato data to the existing knowledge base. This report begins with a description of the research process utilised in this project, which combines a literature review with the collection of Waikato data and a review of available resources. Chapter Two presents the literature review, dividing the material into its different sources, then summarising the literature in terms of the three main factors contributing to driveway runovers. The following chapter provides data on Waikato driveway accidents for the period since May 2006. The type and availability of educational resources is then presented. Chapter Four evaluates existing resources and their availability, suggesting how they might be made more accessible to families. It also assesses existing recommendations and provides further suggestions for enhancing driveway safety. These again reflect the three main categories outlined in the literature – human, vehicle and environmental.

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  • The ABCs of ATVs: Factors implicated in child deaths and injuries involving all terrain vehicles on New Zealand farms

    Basham, Michelle; Nicholls, Mark; Campbell, Maxine M. (2006)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The agricultural sector features prominently in the rates of ATV injuries and fatalities amongst children in New Zealand. This research project assesses the nature and scope of ATV accidents to children on New Zealand farms and provides recommendations that attempt to meet the needs of all relevant stakeholders. In particular, we believe that the most effective means of reducing the rates of ATV injuries and fatalities amongst children involves a strategy which recognises the unique circumstances which give rise to practical impediments to safer farm workplace practices. We identified three distinct groups of children in the literature, each facing a different major risk category. Very young children were most at risk as passengers. As age increased the highest risks applied to bystanders, while older children and teenagers were more likely to be injured as drivers. The high risks to younger children as passengers and bystanders were indicative of underlying problems associated with childcare options – or, more particularly, the lack of childcare options. Accidents involving older children were associated more closely with practices around child supervision and involved aspects of farming culture, rather than practical barriers to safer practices.

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  • Pedalling for safety: Schoolchildren and safe active transport

    Fisher, Kylie; Campbell, Maxine M. (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This research will add to the international body of knowledge around safe active transport and its benefits for individuals and their communities. In order to achieve this, the report begins with a brief description of the risks associated with active transport, 3 and considers why active transport to school should be encouraged, despite the risks. Our dependence on cars is discussed in relation to the prevailing chauffeuring culture, before the objectives of the research are outlined. Chapter one concludes with an account of the methodology used to undertake this research, which combined a literature review and a search for educational resources with some participant observation field research. In chapter 2 we present a summary of the resources available to parents in Hamilton and provide a profile of the city, which is in many ways ideally suited to active transport, though participation rates are low. Chapter 3 discusses the benefits of active transport and the barriers to participation in it. Following a discussion that draws all the various strands together, we evaluate existing strategies with a view to endorsing those most likely to enhance safety, while also offering some further ideas on how to minimise the risks of active transport for children.

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  • Manaakitia te paharakeke: an insight into the daily operational challenges facing Te Whakaruruhau

    Kurei, Anna; Campbell, Maxine M. (2016)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report is based on participant observations of the daily operations at Te Whakaruruhau, Hamilton. The observations represent the fieldwork element of an undergraduate paper contributing to the co-author, Anna Kurei’s Bachelor’s degree at the University of Waikato. Anna’s participation and observations over several weeks included attending meetings, shadowing Advocates, contributing (as appropriate) to operations and observing interactions between Advocates and the women in living in the service’s residential housing. Founded by Ruahine Albert and Ariana Simpson in 1986, Te Whakaruruhau Incorporated (Waikato women's refuge) was the first Māori women's refuge in Aotearoa. Since its inception, Te Whakaruruhau has been a Kaupapa driven service, with Māori cultural practices consciously employed throughout all its operations. Māori tikanga is fluid and adaptable by nature and can therefore meet the needs of people from multiple cultures and backgrounds. The current service has grown from humble beginnings in a four-bedroom state owned house providing emergency housing, to now include a twenty-four-hour crisis service, residential housing and a broadened community outreach programme. Staff numbers have increased from 7 to 36 paid staff and the twenty-fourhour crisis service has allowed the refuge to provide services for high risk cases that would otherwise be turned away. Funding is critical to the successful operation of the service. The refuge provides wrap-around services to meet clients’ needs and help them navigate through a maze of government and community services. The needs of women and families who have lived with domestic violence are deep-seated and complex. Achieving a stable, healthy, independent life is frequently a long-term process. Funding however, is not only limited, but is tied to expectations of achieving successful outcomes in the short-term. It was quickly evident during the fieldwork that Te Whakaruruhau is desperately under-resourced. In the year to June 2015 the Refuge provided services for 6575 cases, but had contracted funds for less than 1600. The consequences of such starkly inadequate resources are dire – for both clients and staff. Advocates (case workers) are frequently exhausted as they try to assist women and children with high and complex needs with very little resources on a highly restricted budget. Many times, workers were observed relegating their own interests (including their own health and safety) in order to meet the demands and needs of their clients. Similarly, the successful rehabilitation of clients is jeopardised by restricted options, insufficient capacity in the system and at times even the simplest of requirements such as transport to essential services. We know that when women and children become free of violence they have better health, employment and education outcomes. These outcomes benefit not only themselves but their communities and the wider social and economic landscape. Higher levels of funding - with a longer term focus- would therefore ultimately reduce the costs of domestic violence overall. Further to this, Kaupapa-based services at Te Whakaruruhau offer a culturally meaningful response to the high representation of Maori women seeking assistance. Its success in the face of such high levels of under-resourcing suggests that expectations around funding also need to be altered.

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  • iPads and opportunities for teaching and learning for young children

    Khoo, Elaine G.L.; Merry, Rosina; Nguyen, Nhung Hong; Bennett, Timothy; MacMillan, Nadine (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This research involved a collaboration with two early childhood education (ECE) teachers at an education and care centre in Hamilton, New Zealand, to gain insight into the perspectives of the teachers, a number of the young children in their care, and the parents/ caregivers of four children concerning iPad adoption and use. Interviews with the two teachers, young children and their parents, observations of teacher interactions with children using iPads, and copies of children’s work produced as part of the teaching and learning process using iPads provided evidence on the use of iPads. iPad use on its own was never the main focus rather it was integrated with and part of teachers’ daily practice and context.

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  • Augmenting primary teaching and learning science through ICT

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Cowie, Bronwen; Khoo, Elaine G.L. (2011)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This study explored how information communication technologies (ICTs) in primary classrooms can enhance the teaching and learning of science. By building on teachers’ and students’ prior knowledge and experience with ICTs, we investigated how ICT use can structure activities to offer enhanced opportunities for active participation in science. The project generated examples of how ICTs can support subject-relevant ways of exploring and communicating science, and evaluating what has been learnt. The major implications from the key finding, found in the Summary report are that; ICTs amplify science learning if teachers unpack the scientific ideas to identify specific pedagogical strategies that exploit the opportunities of each ICT. Visually recorded data present instant, immediate and context-rich information that teachers and students can use as a repository for evaluation, analysis and communication. For ICT-supported activities to meet the needs of diverse learners, students and teachers need “sandpit” time to develop competencies to participate in various tasks. Teachers who use ICTs require support tailored to the specific pedagogical, content and technology needs of the topic they are teaching.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in MidCentral and Whanganui 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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