2,289 results for Report

  • Accidental child driveway runovers: Exploring Waikato data and the efficacy of existing responses

    Hunter, John; Poulgrain, Hayley Mills; Campbell, Maxine M. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    While the numbers of accidents are not high, there is little doubt that driveway runovers are an ongoing, often fatal and inevitably avoidable tragedy for children and their families. In many cases the driver is an immediate family member, or a neighbour or friend, which serves to compound the tragedy. This type of accident is, like other unintentional child injuries, preventable. The over-riding objective of this study is to find ways to minimise the incidence and severity of driveway runovers. We also aim to add Waikato data to the existing knowledge base. This report begins with a description of the research process utilised in this project, which combines a literature review with the collection of Waikato data and a review of available resources. Chapter Two presents the literature review, dividing the material into its different sources, then summarising the literature in terms of the three main factors contributing to driveway runovers. The following chapter provides data on Waikato driveway accidents for the period since May 2006. The type and availability of educational resources is then presented. Chapter Four evaluates existing resources and their availability, suggesting how they might be made more accessible to families. It also assesses existing recommendations and provides further suggestions for enhancing driveway safety. These again reflect the three main categories outlined in the literature – human, vehicle and environmental.

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  • New Zealand Guidelines for cyanobacteria in recreational fresh waters: Interim Guidelines

    Wood, Susanna A.; Hamilton, David P.; Paul, Wendy J.; Safi, Karl A.; Williamson, Wendy M. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This document is divided into four main sections, plus 14 appendices. Section 1. Introduction provides an overview of the purpose and status of the document as well as advice on who should use it. Section 2. Framework provides a background to the overall guidelines approach, recommendations on agency roles and responsibilities, and information on the condition of use of this document. Section 3. Guidelines describes the recommended three-tier monitoring and action sequence for planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria. Section 4. Sampling provides advice on sampling planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria. The appendices give further background information and include templates for data collection and reporting, including: • background information on known cyanotoxins and their distribution in New Zealand • information on the derivation of guideline values • photographs of typical bloom events • a list of biovolumes for common New Zealand cyanobacteria • templates for field assessments • suggested media releases and warning sign templates. A glossary provides definitions for abbreviations and terms used in these guidelines.

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  • Recent studies of sediment capping and flocculation for nutrient stabilisation

    Özkundakci, Deniz; Hamilton, David P. (2006)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Water quality in the Rotorua Lakes has declined in the past 30 to 40 years due to increasing nutrient loads, specifically nitrogen and phosphorus. In situ restoration techniques, including sediment capping and flocculation, have been developed to attempt to reduce internal nutrient loads, which can be comparable in magnitude to external loads in eutrophic lakes. The aim of this report is to summarise the current state of knowledge, and to documents some recent studies of sediment capping and flocculation techniques designed to remove nutrients from the water column by retaining them permanently within the bottom sediments. Experimental set-ups for testing the efficacy of different materials range from conventional batch adsorption studies to sediment reactor experiments. Natural ecosystems have also been simulated with mesocosms in Lake Okaro. A full scale application of aluminium sulphate (alum) in Lake Okar. A full scale application of aluminium sulphate (alum) in Lake Okaro has also been intensively monitored. The different studies have provided information on the restoration potential of some sediment capping agents and flocculants, but many questions still remain. Given the current state of knowledge it is not possible to confirm a priori the circumstances under which a whole lake trial would be successful. Future research should be carried out on the follow foci: • Establishment of chronic or acute toxic effects of the adsorbent materials. • Effect of treatment applications on benthic biota, particularly capping materials that may alter physical characteristics of the sediments. • Application of computer models for the purpose of both hindcasting and better understanding effects of application of an adsorbent to a lake, and for the purpose of predicting the changes in trophic status. • Application techniques and costs, particularly in view of potential for quite radical changes in source of adsorbent materials, grain sizes and methods of application for a single adsorbent.

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  • Waikato peat lakes sediment nutrient removal scoping exercise

    Faithfull, Carolyn L.; Hamilton, David P.; Burger, David F.; Duggan, Ian C. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report was commissioned by Environment Waikato to examine the available methods for internal (bottom sediment) nutrient removal and their suitability for application in the Waikato peat lakes. Lakes Ngaroto, Kainui, Rotomanuka and Cameron were chosen as focus lakes for the study, based on existing restoration objectives and recreational and conservation values. A range of methods designed to reduce internal nutrient loading was reviewed, including hypolimnetic aeration, hypolimnetic withdrawal and fish removal, with sediment removal, and additions of alum, Phoslock, zeolite, iron making slag and carbon examined in detail.

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  • Scootering on: An investigation of children’s use of scooters for transport and recreation

    Wolfaardt, Trish; Campbell, Maxine M. (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Non-motorised scooters have increased significantly in popularity over the last few years in New Zealand, following similar trends in the US, Australia, Canada and Europe. Non-motorised scooters are an important source of recreation, transport and exercise and children of all ages enjoy riding them to and from school and in skate parks. Along with the increase in popularity and use of the scooters, New Zealand is also experiencing a considerable increase in the numbers of injuries to children, with a notable spike in ACC claims in the 2011-12 year. Whilst most of the injuries are moderate – dislocations, fractures, lacerations and soft-tissue injuries – an increase in the number of severe injuries, and at times, even fatalities is also evident. Boys tend to be injured more frequently than girls and the median age for injury is nine years. Most injuries occur at home, with public roads the next most likely location. International literature shows similar trends world-wide. Numbers of scooter injuries are escalating and an intervention to minimise harm and reduce risk is considered imperative in all regions. The evidence shows that children are not wearing protective equipment (such as helmets) when travelling on a non-motorised scooter and there is no legal requirement for them to do so. Elbow and knee pads – and even footwear – were conspicuously absent amongst children observed in fieldwork undertaken for this project. Children routinely use basic scooters for activities unsuited to their design and on terrain that poses further risks. It was also evident that children scootering to school were not subject to the same regulations as those cycling to school and there appears to be a general lack of awareness of the risks associated with scootering. We therefore propose the following recommendations as means by which we might minimise the risks and reduce harm to children: o Amend the current cycle helmet legislation to include the riders of all wheeled recreational devices, irrespective of the age of the rider; o Introduce school policies requiring that helmets and footwear are worn when scootering to and from school; o Implement a minimum age for scootering to and from school; o Extend the coverage of existing school training programmes on road safety in general and safe scootering in particular; o Require compulsory distribution of point-of-sale information packs on the risks of scooters and the protective equipment options available; o Ensure continued funding of current community resources and training initiatives o Further research on scooter accidents and associated risk factors

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  • CoRe: A way to build pedagogical content knowledge for beginning teachers

    Eames, Chris W.; Williams, P. John; Hume, Anne Christine; Lockley, John (2011)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Research has shown that one of the factors which enables teachers to be effective is their rich pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Beginning teachers need support to develop this PCK and recent research in the field has proposed a conceptual tool known as “content representations”, or CoRes, as a model for doing this. The study reported here brought together science and technology experts in content and pedagogy, early career secondary teachers, and researchers to design a CoRe to assist development of teacher PCK. The study then researched the early career teachers’ use of the CoRe in their planning and delivery of a unit in their classrooms to examine the effect of the CoRe on teaching and learning, and on the development of the teachers’ PCK.

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  • Potential science tools to support mahinga kai decision-making in freshwater management

    Collier, Kevin J.; Death, Russell G.; Hamilton, David P.; Quinn, John M. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Mahinga kai is a key value for freshwater management that needs to be articulated in objective setting for environmental limits in the National Objectives Framework (NOF). Mahinga kai generally refers to indigenous freshwater species that have traditionally been used for food, tools or other resources. Many mahinga kai sites, both current and historical, are in lowland settings where freshwater environments are often in a degraded state and values are correspondingly compromised. With limited availability of sites in good condition within rohe to help define desired states for mahinga kai, alternative approaches are needed to establish condition bands for management. In particular, tools that assist with envisaging desired states and predicting environmental changes required to sustain those states will help communities and tangata whenua set management objectives. To achieve this effectively an approach is required that utilises Mātauranga Māori and science tools

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  • Manaakitia te paharakeke: an insight into the daily operational challenges facing Te Whakaruruhau

    Kurei, Anna; Campbell, Maxine M. (2016)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report is based on participant observations of the daily operations at Te Whakaruruhau, Hamilton. The observations represent the fieldwork element of an undergraduate paper contributing to the co-author, Anna Kurei’s Bachelor’s degree at the University of Waikato. Anna’s participation and observations over several weeks included attending meetings, shadowing Advocates, contributing (as appropriate) to operations and observing interactions between Advocates and the women in living in the service’s residential housing. Founded by Ruahine Albert and Ariana Simpson in 1986, Te Whakaruruhau Incorporated (Waikato women's refuge) was the first Māori women's refuge in Aotearoa. Since its inception, Te Whakaruruhau has been a Kaupapa driven service, with Māori cultural practices consciously employed throughout all its operations. Māori tikanga is fluid and adaptable by nature and can therefore meet the needs of people from multiple cultures and backgrounds. The current service has grown from humble beginnings in a four-bedroom state owned house providing emergency housing, to now include a twenty-four-hour crisis service, residential housing and a broadened community outreach programme. Staff numbers have increased from 7 to 36 paid staff and the twenty-fourhour crisis service has allowed the refuge to provide services for high risk cases that would otherwise be turned away. Funding is critical to the successful operation of the service. The refuge provides wrap-around services to meet clients’ needs and help them navigate through a maze of government and community services. The needs of women and families who have lived with domestic violence are deep-seated and complex. Achieving a stable, healthy, independent life is frequently a long-term process. Funding however, is not only limited, but is tied to expectations of achieving successful outcomes in the short-term. It was quickly evident during the fieldwork that Te Whakaruruhau is desperately under-resourced. In the year to June 2015 the Refuge provided services for 6575 cases, but had contracted funds for less than 1600. The consequences of such starkly inadequate resources are dire – for both clients and staff. Advocates (case workers) are frequently exhausted as they try to assist women and children with high and complex needs with very little resources on a highly restricted budget. Many times, workers were observed relegating their own interests (including their own health and safety) in order to meet the demands and needs of their clients. Similarly, the successful rehabilitation of clients is jeopardised by restricted options, insufficient capacity in the system and at times even the simplest of requirements such as transport to essential services. We know that when women and children become free of violence they have better health, employment and education outcomes. These outcomes benefit not only themselves but their communities and the wider social and economic landscape. Higher levels of funding - with a longer term focus- would therefore ultimately reduce the costs of domestic violence overall. Further to this, Kaupapa-based services at Te Whakaruruhau offer a culturally meaningful response to the high representation of Maori women seeking assistance. Its success in the face of such high levels of under-resourcing suggests that expectations around funding also need to be altered.

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results (including Maori ethnicity results)

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2017-05-24)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Abstract: Researchers at the University of Otago are ambivalent about Open Access: in principle they strongly support open access to research literature but their behaviours are driven by the practicalities of cost and publication venue. This document reports the results of a survey carried out in 2015 of University of Otago researchers as to their attitudes towards and behaviours in relation to open access publishing. This version of the report includes a sub-analysis of respondents who selected Maori ethnicity. The original version of the report without this sub-analysis is available via OUR Archive at http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6947 The project page for more information, such as the questions used and the anonymised raw data, is available at https://figshare.com/projects/University_of_Otago_Open_Access_Publishing_Survey_2015-16/17216

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