2,299 results for Report

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report collates a range of routinely collected data sources with a view to: 1. Estimating the prevalence of conditions arising in the perinatal period (e.g. preterm births, congenital and chromosomal anomalies) which may lead to greater health and disability support service demand during childhood and adolescence 2. Identifying the numbers of children and young people with specific chronic conditions and disabilities, who are accessing secondary healthcare services 3. Reviewing the distribution of overweight and obesity and its determinants (nutrition, physical activity) in children and young people In addition, two issues were selected for more in-depth review by participating DHBs at the beginning of the year, with one of these issues, the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents, being split onto two parts due to the large volume of literature in this area. This year’s in depth topics are thus: 1. The Determinants and Consequences of Overweight and Obesity 2. The Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA) This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service, with all of the indicators in the Chronic Conditions and Disabilities stream being updated in this year’s edition. These indicators have been grouped into four sections, as outlined below, with an in-depth topic on the children of parents with mental health issues and alcohol and other addictions (COPMIA) forming the fifth and final section. Section 1: Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period Section 2: Other Disabilities Section 3: Chronic Medical Conditions Section 4: Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity Section 5: Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA)

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Taranaki (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • Information Package for Users of the New Zealand Estimated Food Costs 2016

    Dept. of Human Nutrition, University of Otago (2016-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Since the 1970s, the Department of Human Nutrition (previously Home Science Extension with the School of Home Science) at the University of Otago has conducted an annual Food Cost Survey. The Food Cost Survey is based on a basket of food designed to meet dietary needs of adult males and females (19 years and over), adolescents (11 to 18 years), school aged children (10 and 5 years) and preschool children and infants (4 and 1 years). In recent years food costs have been reported for five cities in New Zealand including Dunedin, Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Hamilton. However, from this year forward, Hamilton will no longer be included in the survey. Most healthy families or individuals will meet their nutritional needs when spending the amount of money specified as the basic costs. However, spending less than this amount increases the risk of not getting all the necessary nutrients. Many people will not lack energy or nutrients when spending less than this amount on food if they make careful management choices. However, the chances of consuming an inadequate diet increase as the amount spent to purchase food falls below the basic costs. Survey methods were revised prior to collecting 2014 data, so 2014-2016 food costs are not directly comparable to previous years. In 2016 estimated weekly food costs for an adult male basic diet were: Auckland $64, Wellington $64, Christchurch $63, and Dunedin $65.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Auckland economy: situation and forecast, November 2009

    Nana, G; Sanderson, K; Leung-Wai, J; Shirley, I; Wilson, D; Neill, CM; Slack, A; Stokes, F; Norman, D; Lynn, A (2012-01-27)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    BERL and the Institute of Public Policy at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) have combined to pull together an economic forecast for the Auckland region economy. Latest employment data released last week confirm that the much-heralded end of the recession remains little more than a technicality. This is as true for the Auckland economy as it is for its national counterpart. The net 13,000 jobs shed from the Auckland economy over the past year mean annual employment contracted by nearly 3 percent over that period. Looking ahead, hopes of an export-led recovery for the New Zealand economy have been dashed by an exchange rate that defies any rational assessment of the fundamentals. Consequently, the short-term outlook for the Auckland economy is best described as unstable. Clearly, the next few months will be better than the first half of 2009, but there will be little to celebrate. We forecast: a sombre export picture for manufacturing; modest, at best, employment growth; a subdued outlook for retail trade; import growth slightly above national; net inward migration gains; moderate house price growth; growth in house building activity; guest nights treading water.

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  • The built environment, Hamilton City Council policies and child driveway safety: a balancing act

    Madley, Brendan; Campbell, Maxine M. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Driveway run-overs continue to bring tragedy to New Zealand families at a higher rate than any other Western nation. Meanwhile, little progress appears to have been made in regard to the recommendations of previous research. This project investigates whether recommendations in regard to one key factor in driveway run-overs, the built environment, are reflected in current local body policies and regulations. The research evaluates Hamilton City Council policies affecting the renovation and/or erection of domestic residences with a view to determining whether they are consistent with existing knowledge and best practice initiatives designed to minimise accidental injuries to children on driveways. The project compares the findings of a review of the existing literature on child safety best practice for the built environment and urban design of driveways, with a review of Hamilton City Council policies and guidelines relating to the built environment of residential properties and adjacent roads (the Operative District Plan, Ten Year Plan, Urban Growth Strategy, Vista, and more), along with relevant central government policy. These findings are triangulated with data from interviews with four expert informants – one child safety expert and three Hamilton City Council employees involved in planning, policy and transport – who provide insights into the translation of policies into practice.

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  • An evaluation of Te Rau Puawai workforce 100: Evaluation overview

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Levy, Michelle Patricia; Henry, Jacqueline; Whangapirita, Laura (2002-05-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In July 2001, the Maori & Psychology Research Unit of the University of Waikato was asked to conduct an evaluation of the Te Rau Puawai programme, a joint venture between the former Health Funding Authority and Massey University. The overall goal of the programme is to contribute at least 100 Maori graduates to the Maori mental health workforce within a five year period. The overall aim of the evaluation was to provide the Ministry of Health with a clearer understanding of the programme including: the perceived critical success factors, the barriers if any regarding Te Rau Puawai, the impact of the programme, the extent to which the programme may be transferable, gaps in the programme, and suggested improvements. Through archival search, questionnaire surveys and interviews, evaluative data was collected from major stakeholders in the Te Rau Puawai programme.

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  • Women's career progression in Auckland law firms: views from the top, views from below

    Pringle, J; Giddings, L; Harris, C; Jaeger, S; Lin, S; Ravenswood, K; Ryan, I (2014-03-17)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Abundance of mysid shrimp (Tenagomysis chiltoni) in shallow lakes in the Waikato region and implications for fish diet

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hicks, Brendan J.; Powrie, Warrick (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Tenagomysis chiltoni, a species of mysid shrimp, is widely distributed amongst the riverine lakes of the lower Waikato basin. They appear to thrive in turbid waters, with the greatest abundances found in lakes such as Waahi and Waikare, which have low Secchi transparencies and sparse aquatic macrophyte communities representing remnants of formerly dense beds (Kirk, 1983; Chapman el al., 1991). Maximum mysid abundances of 2,868 and 857 individuals m⁻² in Lake Waahi and Waikare respectively were recorded by Chapman et al. (1991) in March-April 1987. Anecdotal evidence suggests that mysid abundance in Lake Waikare is markedly reduced since the late 1980s (Gary Watson, Te Kauwhata, pers. comm.) with the arrival and proliferation of koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) presumed to be the cause. Koi carp arrived in Lake Waikare after 1987 and by 2007 it was estimated that over 80% of the fish biomass present in Lake Waikare was comprised of koi carp (Hicks, 2007). Sable isotope studies on carp (Matsuzaki et al., 2007) have shown that mysid shrimp can form a significant component of their diet. This suggests that mysid shrimp may be predated on by koi carp in the Waikato which has implications on mysid shrimp abundance as well as the abundance of native fish species which rely on mysid shrimp as a food source (Champman et al., 1991). The objective of this study was to measure mysid abundance in three shallow, turbid lakes in the lower Waikato basin (Lake Waikare, Whangape and Waahi) to compare with previous abundance estimates made in the late 1980s. A second objective was to determine whether mysid shrimp form a significant component of the diet of koi carp in the study sites by examining their stable isotope signatures.

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  • Monitoring first year Maori students enrolled in selected Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses: A report prepared for the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

    Levy, Michelle Patricia; Williams, Margaret H. (2003-03-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Monitoring first year Maori Students Enrolled in Selected Faculty of Arts andSocial Sciences Courses. The total number of Maori students targeted by this project was 182, representing 93% of the total number of Maori students enrolled in Semester B level one courses. The majority of students participating in this initiative were first year students, although a small number of students taking 100 level courses were second, third or graduate year students. 11 Student views on the monitoring and support initiative Students were provided with the opportunity to comment on the monitoring and support initiative. All students contacted (49) recommended that this intervention continue for future first year Maori students enrolled in FASS.

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  • The Internet in New Zealand 2013

    Gibson, A; Miller, M; Smith, P; Bell, A; Crothers, C (2013-12-16)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Executive Summary The fourth survey of the World Internet Project New Zealand (WIPNZ) was conducted between late July and early September 2013. For the first time, the sample in 2013 used both telephone and internet surveys. This report presents an analysis of the usage of and attitudes to the internet of the resulting sample of 2006 New Zealanders. As internet use approaches saturation in New Zealand, our focus turns from ‘how many people use the internet?’ to ‘how do people use the internet?’ and ‘why do some not use the internet at all?’ To answer these questions, the sample has been divided into five categories: never-users (5% of sample), ex-users (3%), low level users (14%), first generation users (40%) and next generation users (38%). Usage For a large number of people the internet is used daily. Four out of five spend an hour or more online at home every day. Almost everyone under 40 is online, so that only 1% of our under-40 sample are non-users. Accessing the internet ‘on the go’ is prevalent. Seven out of ten users access the internet from a hand-held mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. Almost half of the internet users surveyed (48%) said that they had accessed the internet through a tablet, while an even higher proportion (68%) connected through their mobile phone in the past year. Activities Most internet users say they surf or browse the web (96%) or visit social networking sites (81%). 34% of internet users report that they use the cloud, 41% purchase apps and almost two thirds (65%) download free apps. Most users check their email daily (89%). Just over 60% of men aged 30–44 said they have looked at sites with sexual content. Māori and Pasifika internet users, especially those in lower income households, take the lead in subscriptions to music streaming services like Spotify. More than one in five Māori (21%) and Pasifika (23%) users in households with annual incomes of less than $50,000 have paid for a subscription to a music streaming service in the past year. The internet is used as a tool for consumer decision making, with 94% of users looking for information about products online – more than half of users do this at least weekly. For 85% of users, this kind of online research includes comparing prices. Almost half of our users (47%) have logged in to secure areas on Government or Council websites, and 51% have paid taxes, fines or licences online in the past year. Comparing the importance of media Comparing the importance of various forms of media as information sources, 81% of all our respondents rated the internet (including online media such as streamed radio) as important or very important. This was very much higher than the proportion who rated offline media as important: television (47%), radio (37%) and newspapers (37%). One of the most dramatic differences according to age group is the importance of the internet as a source of entertainment and leisure. While watching (offline) television is an important leisure activity for people across all ages, using the internet as a form of entertainment is a young-person phenomenon: 80% of respondents aged 16–29 rate it as important or very important. This 2013 survey has a different sample structure than previous years in order to include New Zealanders without a landline. The questionnaire has also undergone substantial updating to keep pace with changing digital technologies. For these reasons, the present report focuses solely on the findings for 2013, and longitudinal analyses will be presented in a subsequent report next year.

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  • Predicting the distribution of acid volatile sulfide in marine sediment from colour analysis of sediment-profile images

    Wilson, P; Vopel, K (2011-07-25)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a major concern worldwide. It is caused by an increase in the deposition of organic matter via terrestrial runoff (Gray et al. 2002) and aquaculture (Holmer & Kristensen 1994), or as a result of eutrophication driven by anthropogenic loading of coastal waters with phosphorus and nitrogen (Nixon 1995, Cloern 2001, Rosenberg et al. 2009). In coastal waters the majority of deposited organic carbon is mineralised by bacterial sulfate reduction because of the abundance of sulfate in the marine environement (Thode-Andersen & Jørgensen 1989, Bagarinao 1992). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced during sulfate reduction, reacts with dissolved iron or reactive iron minerals to form acid-extractable iron sulfides (termed acid volatile sulfide, AVS) that contribute to the distinct black colouration of organic-rich sediment. Although there is a strong relationship between sedimentary sulfide content and organic matter input, its measurement has not been used in routine monitoring because of its laborious nature. Bull and Williamson (2001) tested a new approach to predict the sediment AVS concentration from sediment images. The authors used film photography in a laboratory and found a weak linear correlation (R2 = 0.67) between sediment colour and AVS concentration.

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  • Lotteries literature review: final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides an overview of available literature relating to lotteries products, based on five specific question areas of focus: • To what extent do lotteries products in general and New Zealand lotteries products in particular appeal to problem and under-age gamblers? Do someproducts appeal more than others and, if so, can this be described? • What policies, programmes, codes of practice and corporate social responsibility guidelines have other lotteries adopted and is there any evidence about the impact these have had on problem and under-age gamblers? • What other lotteries have made existing or new products available on the internet or via electronic media and what impact, if any, have these had on problem and under-age gambling? • What is the role of lotteries marketing in shaping people’s views on participating in lotteries and about gambling in general? • What education programmes or materials have been developed to educate gamblers about responsible gambling and are there examples of ‘good practice’ in this area? The review was commissioned by the New Zealand Lotteries Commission in order that research gaps could be identified and recommendations made for research that the New Zealand Lotteries Commission could potentially contract. The review consisted of an extensive search of library and other electronic databases, personal specialist collections and grey literature. Professional and personal networks were also drawn on to locate unpublished reports and more especially, organisational documents relating to social responsibility and/or educational programmes and materials that might otherwise not have been easily accessible via the public domain. Relevant documentation was accessed and critically reviewed. Background and contextual information is provided in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 outlines the methodology used. The literature review (Chapter 3) comprises the main body of the report and is followed by the conclusion (Chapter 4), identified research gaps (Chapter 5) and recommendations for research (Chapter 6). Key points from the review follow, grouped under the five questions areas of focus.

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  • Bay of Plenty Region and its Territorial Authorities: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana; Pawar, Shefali (2013-12)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Bay of Plenty Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Foods imported into the Tokelau Islands: 10th May 2008 to 1 April 2012

    Rush, EC; Pearce, L (2013-10-22)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Exploration of the impact of gambling and problem gambling on Pacific families and communities in New Zealand

    Bellringer, M; Fa'amatuainu, B; Taylor, S; Coombes, R; Poon, Z; Abbott, M (2013-12-04)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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