2,304 results for Report

  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

    View record details
  • Assessment of fish populations in Lake Horowhenua, Levin

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua (Waipunahau) is of substantial historical, cultural and recreational value to the people of the Horowhenua region. However, water quality and biodiversity within the lake has been in decline for a number of years. As part of lake restoration efforts by Horizons Regional Council and the Lake Horowhenua Trustees, a survey of fish species in Lake Horowhenua was conducted by the University of Waikato using boat electrofishing and fyke netting. A lake restoration plan had previously identified invasive fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European perch (Perca fluviatilis) as being potential barriers to rehabilitation of the lake. The purpose of this survey was to determine the abundance and diversity of fish species within the lake and to ascertain if pest fish species were present at biomasses high enough to be negatively impacting on lake ecology. Recommendations would then be made as to the potential methods and necessity for pest fish removal.

    View record details
  • Life-history of Lake Horowhenua common smelt: analysis of otolith chemistry and vertebral counts

    Tana, Raymond; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua is a coastal eutrophic lake on the west coast of the North Island. A recent survey of the lake found lower than expected fish diversity but comparatively abundant native fish populations, comprising mostly shortfin and longfin eels (Anguilla australis and A. dieffenbachii). A weir on the outlet of the lake was ifentified as a potential barrier to fish migrations, reducing fish diversity and abundance in the lake. However, large numbers of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) were collected during this survey, indicating that the population was eighter successfully reproducing in the lake or diadromous, i.e., migrating from the sea. Previous studies have shown that lacustrine common smelt can be distinguished from diadromous populations by differences in counts of vertebrae and gill rakers, and otolith microchemistry. Horizons Regional Council requested that an analysis of smelt otoliths and relevant morphological characteristics be performed to ascertain if the Lake Horowhenua population was diadromous.

    View record details
  • Preliminary analysis of boat electrofishing in the Waikato River in the vicinity of the Huntly Power Station: Part 1 - fishing on 2 September 2013

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report gives a basic summary of the first sampling of a three-part monitoring project for Genesis Power Ltd (Genesis) that the University of Waikato is undertaking in close collaboration with National Institute of Water and Environmental Research Institute Atmosphere Ltd (NIWA), Hamilton, Boat electrofishing results will eventually be combined with netting undertaken by NIWA in a final report to Genesis. The boat electrofishing survey took place on 2 September, the objective of which was to undertake the first of three surveys to estimate fish distributions and abundances over key seasons: 1. Early spring 2013 (end August/early September) to target peak trout abundances and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. 2. Summer 2014 (Jan/February) to capture peak summer abundances for target indigenous and exotic species. 3. Winter 2014 (June/July) to target mullet and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. At the surveyed reach is about 80 km from the sea, and at this point the Waikato River is a 7th order river with at a bed elevation of about 19.1 m above sea level. The catchment area upstream is 12,188 km², and the river has a mean flow of 352.3 m³ s⁻¹ and a mean annual low flow of 123.5 m³ s⁻¹ (Freshwater Fish Database Assistant version 6.1, I.G. Jowett).

    View record details
  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

    View record details
  • Pricing Variance Swaps in a Hybrid Model of Stochastic Volatility and Interest Rate With Regime-switching

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we consider the problem of pricing discretely-sampled variance swaps based on a hybrid model of stochastic volatility and stochastic interest rate with regime-switching. Our modeling framework extends the Heston stochastic volatility model by including the CIR stochastic interest rate and model parameters that switch according to a continuous-time observable Markov chain process. A semi-closed form pricing formula for variance swaps is derived. The pricing formula is assessed through numerical implementations, and the impact of including regime-switching on pricing variance swaps is also discussed.

    View record details
  • Three Open Problems on the Wijsman Topology

    Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since it first emerged in Wijsman's seminal work [29], the Wijsman topology has been intensively studied in the past 50 years. In particular, topological properties of Wijsman hyperspaces, relationships between the Wijsman topology and other hyperspace topologies, and applications of the Wijsman topology in analysis have been explored. However, there are still several fundamental open problems on this topology. In this article, the author gives a brief survey on these problems and some up-to-date partial solutions.

    View record details
  • Oscillation Revisited

    Beer, G; Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In previous work by Beer and Levi [8, 9], the authors studied the oscillation Ω(f, A) of a function f between metric spaces hX, di and hY, ρi at a nonempty subset A of X, defined so that when A = {x}, we get Ω(f, {x}) = ω(f, x), where ω(f, x) denotes the classical notion of oscillation of f at the point x ∈ X. The main purpose of this article is to formulate a general joint continuity result for (f, A) 7→ Ω(f, A) valid for continuous functions.

    View record details
  • He Ara Angitu: A Description of Literacy Achievement for Year 0 - 2 students in Total Immersion in Māori Programmes

    Rau, Cath R.; Whiu, Iria; Thomson, Hone; Glynn, Ted; Milroy, Wharehuia (2001)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In response to the recommendations of the Literacy Taskforce Report (1999) and issues highlighted in the Green Paper - Assessment for Success in Primary Schools (1998), the Ministry of Education funded a project in 2000 and 2001 to develop a description of achievement in reading and writing for five-year-old Māori medium students. This provided the opportunity to take a systematic comprehensive look at children’s literacy performance during the first two years of instruction and begin to identify reasonable expectations of progress in reading, written and oral language.

    View record details
  • Problem gambling assessment and screening instruments: phase two final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M; Coombes, R; Garrett, N; Volberg, R (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Objectives: This project was commissioned by the Problem Gambling Committee (PGC); subsequently the Ministry of Health assumed responsibility from the PGC. The primary objectives of the project were to: 1. Review the assessment and screening instruments currently used in New Zealand and internationally for the assessment of problem gamblers at the clinical level including by the telephone helpline 2. Following the review, to recommend a full set of screening and assessment instruments to be used in the clinical treatment of problem gamblers; selected instruments should be able to be used to monitor client progress in follow-up assessments currently undertaken at various set intervals 3. To pilot the recommended screening and assessment instruments in order to test the application of these screens in the New Zealand setting The research was divided into two phases. There was a particular focus on the screening instruments currently mandated for use by Ministry of Health funded problem gambling service providers, namely the South Oaks Gambling Screen - Three Month time frame (SOGS-3M), DSM-IV gambling criteria, Dollars Lost assessment and Control over Gambling assessment. Other screening tools used by the service providers were also considered. Additionally, the family/whanau checklist for use with ‘significant others’ was reviewed.

    View record details
  • Problem gambling - Pacific islands families longitudinal study: final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M; Williams, M; Gao, W (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) study has been following a cohort of Pacific children since the year 2000. The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the pathways leading to optimal health, development and social outcomes for Pacific children and their families. Pacific peoples are at high risk for developing problem gambling (the highest risk of the ethnicities living in New Zealand) and have shown heterogeneous differences between the different Pacific cultures in relation to gambling. This highlights the need for significant further study in this area. The longitudinal cohort PIF study has offered a valuable and unique opportunity to study gambling and problem gambling within a Pacific family and child development context, allowing for sub-analyses of the major ethnic Pacific groups and the potential to begin identifying risk and protective factors in the development of problem gambling. In April 2006, the Gambling Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Problem Gambling - Pacific Islands Families Longitudinal Study. The purpose of this project was to enhance and add value to the existing PIF study by incorporating a substantial gambling component in the six-year data collection phase. Methodology A range of gambling-related questions was incorporated into the interview questionnaire protocols for mothers and fathers of the cohort children at the six-year data collection phase. The questions related to gambling participation and to having problems because of someone else’s gambling, and included problem gambling screens (Problem Gambling Severity Index [PGSI] for mothers and fathers, and South Oaks Gambling Screen - Revised [SOGS-R] for fathers only). All cohort parents (mothers and fathers) were invited to participate in the PIF study six-year assessment. In keeping with previous procedures, all participants were visited in their homes by gender- and ethnically-matched interviewers to complete the structured assessments. Results and discussion This study has significantly increased the knowledge around Pacific peoples’ gambling since the nature of the general population cohort has allowed for analyses to be performed by different Pacific ethnicities and other cultural and demographic variables, which is not usually possible in general population studies due to small Pacific participant sample sizes. Whilst the data in this report represent a cross-section in time, at the six-year data collection point for the cohort, the potential exists for gambling to continue to be a significant part of future data collection phases. This will allow for longitudinal analyses to explore the links between parental gambling and child development of gambling behaviours, as well as risk and protective factors for problem gambling amongst not only adults but also children as they progress through teenage years and into adulthood. It will also allow for exploration of changes over time in regard to gambling participation and problem gambling risk and protective factors. Gambling participation was lower amongst the participants in the cohort than would be expected though a bimodal distribution of gambling (low numbers of people gambling with those who do gamble reporting higher than average expenditure on gambling) was apparent, as was expected from previous national prevalence surveys. Thirty-six percent of all mothers and 30% of all fathers reported that they had gambled in the previous 12 months. Of the mothers and fathers who had gambled, Lotto was the form of gambling most played (89% mothers, 88% fathers) with much lower levels of participation in other forms of gambling. Gender differences were apparent for non-Lotto forms of gambling with mothers participating in Housie and Instant Kiwi gambling (both at 11%) and fathers participating in casino electronic gaming machine (20%), non-casino electronic gaming machine (15%) and Instant Kiwi (14%) gambling. The most preferred forms of gambling were Lotto (80% of gamblers) followed by Housie (9%) for mothers and Lotto (78%) followed by horse/dog race betting (6%) and sports betting at the TAB (5%) for fathers. Amongst those who gambled, four percent of mothers and 16% of fathers were classified as moderate risk or problem gamblers using the PGSI. Using the SOGS-R, 10% of fathers were classified as problem or probable pathological gamblers. Ethnicity appeared to be a key factor in mothers’ gambling but not for fathers. Tongan mothers were less likely to gamble than Samoan mothers; however, those who gambled were 2.4 times more likely to be classified as at risk/problem gamblers, indicating that Tongan mothers are at higher risk for developing problem gambling. Cultural orientation appeared to be related to gambling (in some cases, less gambling) both for mothers and fathers, though different orientations were associated with gambling for the different genders. Fathers who were in the higher total net weekly household income brackets (>$500) were more likely to gamble than fathers in the lower income bracket (<$501), whilst mothers with post-school qualifications were less likely to gamble (0.7 times) than mothers with no formal qualifications. Further gender differences were noted in terms of associations between gambling and health. For fathers both gambling and at risk/problem gambling were associated with psychological distress. Fathers who gambled were more likely to be perpetrators as well as victims of verbal aggression than fathers who did not gamble, with at risk/problem gambling also being associated with physical violence. These findings were not noted amongst mothers whereby at risk/problem gamblers were significantly less likely to perpetrate violence than non-problem gamblers. Not unexpectedly, smoking and alcohol consumption (particularly at higher/harmful levels) were associated with gambling (though not with at risk/problem gambling) both for mothers and fathers. In addition, mothers who drank alcohol were also more likely to have a weekly gambling expenditure in the upper quartile (≥$20) than mothers who did not drink, with increased frequency and amount of consumption associated with increased risk of higher gambling expenditure; this finding was not noted amongst fathers. In addition, a clear association was noted between higher (upper quartile) expenditure on gambling and being classified (PGSI) as a low risk/moderate risk/problem gambler with at risk/problem gambler classified mothers three times more likely, and at risk/problem gambler classified fathers six times more likely to spend in the upper quartile on gambling than non-problem gamblers. The problem gambling screens used (PGSI for mothers and fathers and SOGS-R for fathers only) showed very good internal consistency (reliability). There was good agreement between the PGSI and SOGS-R with 94% of fathers identified as problem gamblers by the SOGS-R also being classified as at risk/problem gamblers by the PGSI. In addition, questions related to lying about gambling and betting more than intended also associated well with the PGSI and SOGS-R within this Pacific cohort. The results suggest that the use of any of these problem gambling screens may be valid for use within a general Pacific population, though this would need to be further tested. Four percent of mothers and ten percent of fathers reported that they had experienced problems because of someone else’s gambling. The findings detailed in this report indicate that different gender and ethnic differences exist amongst Pacific people who should, therefore, not be considered as a homogeneous group. This has implications for service provision by organisations providing services for Pacific people as well as social marketing campaigns around gambling and problem gambling.

    View record details
  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project. Second Report: Understanding New Zealand’s Very Local National Standards

    Thrupp, Martin (2013-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the second report of the Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the introduction of National Standards into New Zealand primary and intermediate schools.

    View record details
  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

    View record details
  • Literature review of older adult involvement in the service delivery quality monitoring process

    Jones, M; Wright-St Clair, VA (2011-10-14)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Given the emphasis on patient satisfaction as a quality indicator in health care, it is considered an important outcome measure. How and when such a measure is undertaken influences how patients and their families respond. Some patients and families find it difficult to know how service decisions are made, when interventions should be undertaken and what they should expect regarding their care and discharge. Therefore, these factors present a challenge for gathering feedback in the form of a satisfaction survey, whether by self report, focus group, face-to-face or telephone interviews. The research literature suggests there is a need to review quality monitoring processes to ascertain how information is gathered and how the processes required are conveyed to patients in ways that they can readily respond to. The interest in gaining feedback from patients and families is generally driven by a desire to highlight the aspects of service that require change or improvement. However, any resulting service changes ought to be in the best interests of the patient and family, with a shared investment in ensuring the best outcomes for all including the institution and the health professional staff. Therefore, careful consideration needs to be given to what to measure and how to measure it. A first concern is the reliability and validity of the data gathering tool which affects the specificity and usefulness of the information gathered. Ware (1981, 1983) cautions that it is wrong to equate all patient survey information with satisfaction, as there are differences in expectations and time frames of care. Where the patients are at on their journey of recovery or care is also influential. Jenkinson et al (2002) agrees with Ware in that patient satisfaction scores are limited, and measuring patient‘s experiences can be more useful toward improving healthcare. Ovretveit (1998:244) believes that patients will only communicate their perceptions and experiences depending on:  How easy it is for them to do so;  Whether they think the staff really want to know;  How strongly they feel;  Their social background;  Their personality;  Their personal state at the time; and  Their wish to make things better for other patients. Ovretveit (1992) emphasizes that healthcare quality has three dimensions: quality for clients, professional quality and management quality, and involves a set of methods with its own philosophy. However, when services are under more pressure than ever, it is extremely difficult to find development finance to invest in a quality programme, along with the time and energy of staff to apply these methods‖ (Ovretveit, 1992:7). The purpose of this literature review is to identify the involvement of older adults in service delivery quality monitoring processes.

    View record details
  • 2014 Fieldays in Hamilton: Economic impacts for the Waikato Region and New Zealand

    Hughes, Warren (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The 2014 Fieldays event over 11 –14 June attracted 119,892 gate entries which was 4.2% lower than in 2013. For the 2014 event, a total of 942 firms exhibited their goods and services (up 4.9% over 2013) including 71 overseas firms (+109%) using a total of 1366 exhibitor sites (+4.8%).

    View record details
  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

    View record details
  • The Computation of Key Properties of Markov Chains via Perturbations

    Hunter, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Computational procedures for the stationary probability distribution, the group inverse of the Markovian kernel and the mean first passage times of a finite irreducible Markov chain, are developed using perturbations. The derivation of these expressions involves the solution of systems of linear equations and, structurally, inevitably the inverses of matrices. By using a perturbation technique, starting from a simple base where no such derivations are formally required, we update a sequence of matrices, formed by linking the solution procedures via generalized matrix inverses and utilising matrix and vector multiplications. Four different algorithms are given, some modifications are discussed, and numerical comparisons made using a test example. The derivations are based upon the ideas outlined in Hunter, J.J., “The computation of stationary distributions of Markov chains through perturbations”, Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis, 4, 29-46, (1991).

    View record details
  • Debriefing following seclusion and restraint: a summary of relevant literature

    Sutton, D; Webster, S; Wilson, M

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides a summary of current debriefing practices that have been shown to support strategy six in the Six Core Strategies© and supports seclusion or restraint reduction programmes, drawn from a review or relevant literature. The document provides a foundation for services to develop or modify current debriefing practices in line with evidence-informed guidelines.

    View record details
  • Laptops for teachers: An evaluation of the TELA scheme in schools (Years 4 to 6)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann; Forret, Michael; McGee, Clive; Miller, Thelma (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this evaluation was to investigate the impacts of the Laptops for Teachers Scheme (referred to from here as the TELA scheme) on Years 4 to 6 teachers’ work over a period of three years (2004-2006) and to record emerging changes in laptop use. The investigation focused on the Ministry of Education expectation (Ministry of Education, 2004) that teacher access to a laptop for their individual professional use would lead to gains in confidence and expertise in the use of ICTs, to efficiencies in administration, would contribute to teacher collaboration and support the preparation of high quality lesson resources. It was also anticipated that teacher would use their laptop in the classroom for teaching and learning.

    View record details
  • Social Objective Synthesis Report 2: Social Differentiation and Choice of Management System among ARGOS Farmers/Orchardists

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2009)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The ARGOS (Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability) project was designed to enable the interrogation of the condition of sustainability in the New Zealand agriculture sector. To account for the country’s reliance on a neoliberal (or market driven) policy orientation, the research programme compares groups of producers organised into panels whose members comply with similar audit schemes that regulate entrance into high value export markets. Because these audit schemes often include criteria or standards associated with improved environmental or social practice, comparison of the panels on the basis of economic, environmental and social measures and indicators provides insight to the potential for such schemes to promote a more sustainable agriculture sector in New Zealand. To the extent that such schemes do influence practice, we would expect to differentiate among the panels in reference to such criteria. As part of the overall ARGOS analysis, this report provides a synthesis of the social research conducted within the project and contributes to the examination of the ARGOS null hypothesis, namely that there is no significant difference in the economic, environmental and social dimensions and characteristics of the participating farms and orchards. The report’s main objectives are to assess both the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. To the extent that this analysis provides evidence to reject the null hypothesis, it is possible to inform understandings of agricultural sustainability as well as provide insight to the potential pathways to improving this condition.

    View record details