2,299 results for Report

  • Field-based early childhood teacher education : "but are they already teachers ...".

    Brennan, M.; Everiss, L.; Mara, D. (2011)

    Report
    Open Polytechnic

    Despite its long history in early childhood initial teacher education (ITE) programmes, there remains a limited research base about the nature of the field-based approach and more specifically student/tutor interactions in the tertiary classroom. This study adds to a growing area of scholarship that seeks to articulate a distinct pedagogical base to field-based teacher education. The tertiary classroom was chosen as the site of study because it affords researchers and teachers opportunity to place an intense focus on students and tutors 'doing field-based teacher education' and to explore new understandings that sit apart from traditional preservice ITE approaches.

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  • Enhancing learning for engineering trade learners: Augmented paper-based materials in course design.

    Brown, C.; Glaeser, M.; Maathuis-Smith, S.; Mersham, G. M. (2010)

    Report
    Open Polytechnic

    This project tested the feasibility of embedding augmented reality targets, which could be viewed on computers using a simple webcam, into print material for second-year apprentice engineering trade learners at the Open Polytechnic. This would enable them to see the images in 3-D form, thus improving their learning experience. With augmented reality (AR) software the real-world image is augmented by virtual computer-generated imagery that is created when a webcam or camera-like device "reads" the target embedded in a page. The second-year apprentice engineering trade learners were chosen as a "test" group because they are generally kinaesthetic learners who don't always have access to the real-life artefacts they are studying. If this project was successful, further developments could be undertaken to enable augmented targets to be viewed via cellphones. Learners who view images of artefacts on a computer screen are able to rotate and enlarge them, as well as view them from different angles.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Issues facing Southland’s wetlands - recommendations for future management

    Campbell, David I.; Clarkson, Beverley R.; Clarkson, Bruce D.

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this report we provide an overview of the issues facing Southland’s wetlands as we perceive them and record our recommendations for future management

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  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

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  • E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū: Indigenous methods of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Scofield, Paul; Raharuhi, Urukeiha; Green, Lynda; Matamua, Rangi; Temara, Pou; Roa, Tom (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Naming in Māori society is a relationship of mana. It is a relationship formulated on establishing and reinforcing connections, identity, and place through whakapapa, between the person or group doing the naming and the thing being named. Māori have always named our world and therefore our realities. The overall goal of this Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga-funded extension of excellence project was to research and investigate indigenous methodologies of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa and to develop a naming protocol for the naming of birds in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In addition to semi-structured interviews and a wānanga, reviews of scientific, archival and oral Māori resources, were undertaken.

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  • The Impact of Person-Directed Care at Metlifecare - Application of the Eden Alternative. The Final Report - August 2016

    Yeung, PHY; Dale, M; Rodgers, V; O'Donoghue, K (2016-09-13)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Non-Government Organisations (NGO) Study Awards – Exploring the Impact on Social Work Students and Social Service Organisations

    Yeung, PHY; Mooney, H; English, A (2016-09-16)

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • The sustainable delivery of sexual violence prevention education in schools

    Julich, SJ; Oak, E; Terrell, J; Good, G (2015)

    Report
    Massey University

    Sexual violence is a crime that cannot be ignored: it causes our communities significant consequences including heavy economic costs, and evidence of its effects can be seen in our criminal justice system, public health system, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), and education system, particularly in our schools. Many agencies throughout New Zealand work to end sexual violence. Auckland-based Rape Prevention Education: Whakatu Mauri (RPE) is one such agency, and is committed to preventing sexual violence by providing a range of programmes and initiatives, information, education, and advocacy to a broad range of audiences. Up until early 2014 RPE employed one or two full-time positions dedicated to co-ordinating and training a large pool (up to 15) of educators on casual contracts to deliver their main school-based programmes, BodySafe – approximately 450 modules per year, delivered to some 20 high schools. Each year several of the contract educators, many of whom were tertiary students, found secure full time employment elsewhere. To retain sufficient contract educators to deliver its BodySafe contract meant that RPE had to recruit, induct and train new educators two to three times every year. This model was expensive, resource intense, and ultimately untenable. The Executive Director and core staff at RPE wanted to develop a more efficient and stable model of delivery that fitted its scarce resources. To enable RPE to know what the most efficient model was nationally and internationally, with Ministry of Justice funding, RPE commissioned Massey University to undertake this report reviewing national and international research on sexual violence prevention education (SVPE). [Background from Executive Summary.]

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  • Report on the 2010/2011 West Bengal Anglo-Indian Survey: ‘Anglo-Indian Count’

    Andrews, RA (2015-08-31)

    Report
    Massey University

    In December 2010 and the first few months of 2011 a survey was conducted in West Bengal which collected demographic information on the Anglo-Indian community. This report describes the methods used and presents selected findings under the headings: educational levels, housing, amenities, card-holding, employment, income, languages spoken, and religion.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Investigation into the business and operations of Carlton Party Hire Limited.

    Hart, Graeme Richard (1988)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    107 leaves. University of Otago programme: MBA. From title page: "Project 660".

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  • Generation Y Mobilities: Full Report

    Hopkins, Debbie; Stephenson, Janet (2015-04-29)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Dunedin Energy Baseline Study

    Gabriel, Cle-Anne; Stephenson, Janet; Carrington, Gerry (2015-09)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

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  • Extended Baseline Report: Graduate Longitudinal Study

    Tustin, Karen; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Taylor, Nicola; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Hunter, Jackie; Harold, Gordon; Poulton, Richie (2012-04-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Marketing education: recommendations for targeting Asian students - Report 3

    Fam, Kim-Shyan; Simpson, Lisa (2001)

    Report
    University of Otago

    As shown in Report 2 of this series, the Asian market is proving to be an increasingly attractive area of opportunity for New Zealand tertiary educational institutions. Where Report 2 aimed to identify how New Zealand tertiary institutions could better target this lucrative market, this report aims to provide some distinct recommendations for tertiary educational services marketers attempting to enter the three countries used in the study. These recommendations are in terms of promotional message, promotional tools and media and key marketing strategies that are most effective in Malaysia, Hong Kong and Singapore.

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  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Data for an Archaeozoological Analysis of Marine Resource Use in Two New Zealand Study Areas (Revised edition)

    Smith, Ian; James-Lee, Tiffany (2010-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Energy Transitions: Lighting in Vanuatu

    Walton, Sara; Doering, Adam; Gabriel, Cle-Anne; Ford, Rebecca (2014)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Lighting Vanuatu began in 2010 as a two-year project funded through The Australian Aid - Governance for Growth Programme. The primary objective of the project was to increase access of portable solar lanterns for rural Vanuatu communities in an effort to reduce their dependency on kerosene as the primary source of household lighting. To achieve this goal the project offered a supply-side subsidy for two Vanuatu NGOs (ACTIV and VANREPA) to support the distribution of 24, 000 solar lamps mainly to rural areas. The subsidy was aimed at improving bulk purchasing power by the NGO’s in an effort to reduce the price of the imported solar lights at the household level. The analysis of the Independent Completion Review (ICR), Business Case Study (Annex 1), and the Survey Data Overview (Annex 3) indicate that the Lighting Vanuatu project has been successful in enabling the uptake and awareness of portable solar lighting products. These reports highlight that the transition from kerosene lamps to solar throughout the islands of Vanuatu was both clear and ubiquitous. When framed at this descriptive level, the project certainly presents a good news story for renewable energy. The rapid transformation from a non-renewable to a renewable source of lighting within a 2 to 3 year period runs counter to many of the discussions in developed countries who struggle to disrupt the locked-in energy systems that sustain and maintain a reliance on fossil fuels. Considered alongside the slow and politically infused renewable energy debates in the developed country context, Vanuatu’s rapid adoption of portable solar lighting is precisely the kind of transitional story that many communities could only dream of achieving. However, the successful or unsuccessful acquisition and diffusion of a particular piece of technology – portable solar lamps – is only part of the story. The initial aim of the Independent Completion Review (ICR) was to identify the degree of adoption and contribution made by Lighting Vanuatu, any geographic, social or cultural trends evident in adoption patterns, any economic or social benefits, specific changes in the lighting technology used by households, changes in household practices associated with any shift in technology, and changes in householders’ perceived needs and aspirations with regard to lighting. While this descriptive analysis is essential for evaluating the success of the programme within its own terms (i.e. the ICR), the broader cultural, economic and political implications of this technological diffusion have yet to be addressed. The purpose of Annex 2, therefore, is to develop the Lighting Vanuatu story further by offering a more nuanced interpretation of the transition from kerosene to portable solar lights in rural Vanuatu communities; our emphasis and focus is different to that of the ICR, but complements and enhances the understanding of Lighting Vanuatu as an aid project. We begin by outlining the methodology used to gather and interpret the information that informs this report. We then draw on the Energy Cultures Framework (Stephenson et al., 2010) as an organising structure for describing Vanuatu’s prevailing energy culture. Next, we address four key debates to emerge from the fieldwork with the hope of encouraging a reflection on the shifting social norms and practices (economic and political) that are also ‘diffused’ with the introduction of a new piece of material culture like the portable solar lamps. The annex concludes with a comment on the implications of this analysis for future energy-related development projects in Vanuatu.

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  • Increasing capacity at Monarch Wildlife Cruises and Tours: a case study approach

    Keenan, Victoria (2004-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Monarch Wildlife Cruises and Tours is a small eco-tourism business providing tours of the Otago Peninsula and an unrivalled wildlife cruise around Taiaroa Head. This company has continued to grow since its inception in 1985, but faces serious capacity constraints in the land transport aspect of its business. The purpose of this research is to examine options available to the company to increase their land transport capacity; the aim is to evaluate each option and recommend the most appropriate forward focus for the business. The research was conducted using a single case study methodology and involved four stages. These stages included a review of the academic literature, semi-constructed interviews, the collection of data through company documentation and observation as well as various discussions with potential organisations that lease and sell buses. Seven options for increasing the transport capacity of the company were investigated in this research. These were: staying with the status quo, withdrawing the transport from the tours, buying an additional bus, selling their van and buying or leasing an additional bus, selling all the vehicles or leasing them on long - term contracts. The last option investigated in this research was contracting all transport facilities to another party. Each option was analysed on cost, practicality, and its overall effect on the business. The benefits and disadvantages of each option were also discussed and contributed to the final decision. It is recommended that the transport aspect of the business be contracted out to another party. Further investigation will be required to determine the most appropriate organisation to contract to. Further work will also be needed to define the terms of such an agreement. However, at this stage Malcolm Budd from the Otago Explorer seems to meet all requirements. The recommended option was chosen because of its propensity to be cost effective and provide benefits that would outweigh cost. The disadvantages of this option were found to be minimal in that they would not adversely affect service quality or the core operations of the business, which is wildlife cruises. Lastly, the recommendation effectively increased the company's transport capacity and proved to be advantageous over the long term. Secondary recommendations included decreasing prices in the winter months to encourage people that might not otherwise purchase the tours; that the number of free of charge passengers be reduced in order to make room for paying customers, and to further manipulate demand and supply by allowing employees to leave secondary tasks till quieter periods, when the business is busy. The company also has the potential to diversify into other areas and increase customer involvement in the service delivery process by allowing customers to book and pay their tours on-line.

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