12 results for Scholarly text, 1940

  • Studies on the Systematics and Anatomy of New Zealand Earthworms

    Lee, Kenneth Ernest (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The study of New Zealand earthworms has been extensive, but has been confined principally to the systematics of the group. Only one family of the Oligochaeta, the Megascolecidae, is represented in the endemic fauna, but within this family, over eighty species, belonging to seventeen genera, have been recorded and described. Apart from the Megascolecidae, certain species, lumbricids, worldwide in their distribution, are present and are regarded as having been introduced through the agency of man. The family Megascolecidae is confined almost entirely to the Southern hemisphere, and the southern regions of the Northern hemisphere, and within these regions, the greatest number of species occur in New Zealand, South America, South Africa, and Australia. When the distribution of the Megascolecidae became known, in the late nineteenth century, its sporadic nature evoked a great deal of interest among zoo-geographers, since earthworms, being terrestrial, and unable to tolerate immersion in salt water, form an ideal basis for the consideration of dispersal problems among terrestrial animals as a whole. The interest thus aroused in the Megascolecidae led to much work on the group in New Zealand. Michaelsen (1913 (b)) accounts for the predominance of the Megascolecidae in the southern continental areas by postulating that originally the family had a wide distribution in the nothern and southern continents, and that other families (e.g. the Glossoscolecidae), evolved more recently in the northern continents, have gradually superseded the Megascolecidae in all but the most remote regions of their original area of distribution. Matthew (1915) came to a similar conclusion in regard to the origin of present southern faunas in the course of his work on the distribution and evolution of the Mammalia. Evidence in favour of Michaelsen's conclusions can also be derived from the distribution of slugs, spiders, Collembola, Coleoptera, littoral Echinoderms, Polychaeta and Brachiopoda in the southern land masses.

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  • A Study of Our Knowledge of Persons with Special Reference to the Work of Dr. Martin Buber

    Brown, Denzil J. (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The field of philosophy is wide and varied, and often appears to be remote from the common life of men. Yet this remoteness is only superficial for the problems with which philosophy deals arise in the first instance from questions which occur to the man in the street, though he may not pursue them systematically. He cannot avoid meeting them, though he may avoid trying to answer them. What is the meaning of life? What is the meaning of the universe? Is the ordering of nature, of society of the individual organism quite fortuitous or according to some unwritten law? How do we know other people and objects? What is the nature of God? That these questions are dependent upon human reflection is not hard to see. They arise out of reflection, and they depend to a greater or less degree upon reflection for their answer. But we may go further and question reflection itself: What is the nature of reflection? What is its subject matter? Is reflection reliable? In other words, “How do we know?” The examination of this question constitutes that aspect of philosophy known as “Epistemology”, and upon the answer to that question the fate of philosophy depends to a great extent.

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  • Calendar 1948

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1948)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1940

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1940)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1943

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1943)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1945

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1945)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1946

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1946)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1941

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1941)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1944

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1944)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1947

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1947)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1942

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1942)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1949

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1949)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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