1,669 results for Scholarly text, 2000

  • A window to a magical world of adventure, secrets and spectacle: Peter Pan [Review]

    Crawford, Terri Ripeka (2009)

    Scholarly text
    University of Waikato

    Choreography: Russell Kerr Music: Philip Norman Design: Kristian Fredrikson Lighting: Jon Buswell ROYAL NEW ZEALAND BALLET at Founders Theatre, Hamilton From 9 Dec 2009 to 10 Dec 2009 Reviewed by Terri Ripeka Crawford, 11 Dec 2009

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  • Taking quality work to a new brilliance: Tama Ma on tour [Review]

    Crawford, Terri Ripeka (2009)

    Scholarly text
    University of Waikato

    Choreographers: Taiaroa Royal and Taane Mete; Douglas Wright; Michael Parmenter Okareka Dance Company at Telecom Playhouse Theatre, WEL Energy Trust Academy of Performing Arts, Hamilton From 17 Jun 2009 to 20 Jun 2009 Reviewed by Terri Ripeka Crawford, 22 Jun 2009.

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  • Mating strategies and sperm competition in New Zealand geckos (Family Gekkonidae).

    Todd, Amanda Claire (2003)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Most species of reptile studied to date have polygynandrous mating systems and possess specialised sperm storage regions. Consequently, there is a high potential for sperm competition in this group. Using comparative analyses, I examined the level of sperm competition in New Zealand geckos and how this has influenced the evolution of their reproductive morphology. Across lizards and snakes, there was more than a 40-fold variation in relative testis size. New Zealand geckos fell in the middle of this range and lacked sexual dimorphism in head size, suggesting that most species have polygynandrous mating systems. I confirmed this for one species, Hoplodactylus maculatus, which is gregarious, lacks territoriality and has a courtship pattern that suggests a high level of promiscuity for both sexes. I found that hemipenis size in New Zealand geckos was positively correlated with relative testis size, suggesting that sperm competition has resulted in the evolution of larger intromittent organs. However, the surface features of the hemipenis were relatively conservative across species. Although there was no relationship between sperm length or putative sperm storage site (SST) morphology and relative testis size, species with fewer SSTs, and thus more intense sperm competition, had longer sperm. H maculatus males produced two types of sperm which differed not only in length but also in fertilising capacity, the short morph lacking DNA. This is the first known example of such sperm polymorphism in a vertebrate and may have evolved in response to sperm competition, the non-fertilising morph potentially helping to block the sperm of rival males or filling sperm storage sites. The motility of these short sperm was positively correlated with temperature; however, at higher temperatures motility declined with time, suggesting a trade-off between motility and longevity. Such temperature influences on male reproductive physiology have important implications for males of ectothermic species under sperm competition.

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  • Creating New Standards: Jazz Arrangements Of Pop Songs

    Lile, Trudy (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study involves the research, analysis, and performance of existing arrangements of songs that have been played and recorded by jazz musicians, and are identifiable as pop songs of the last thirty years. This project will discuss the development of these songs as new repertoire in the jazz idiom. In particular it will examine transcriptions of arrangements by Herbie Hancock, Dianne Reeves, Brad Meldau, Charlie Hunter, Christian McBride, and Bob Belden. The analysis of these transcriptions will consider the techniques these musicians used in their arrangements including reharmonisation, melodic interpretation, rhythm, and restructuring of the form of the original song. Further, the techniques identified in the analyses will be applied in the creation of new arrangements of similar songs from that era for jazz ensemble of various sizes.

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  • Bacterial Communities Associated with Human Decomposition

    Parkinson, Rachel (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Human decomposition is a little-understood process with even less currently known about the microbiology involved. The aim of this research was to investigate the bacterial community associated with exposed decomposing mammalian carcasses on soil and to determine whether changes in this community could potentially be used to determine time since death in forensic investigations. A variety of soil chemistry and molecular biology methods, including molecular profiling tools T-RFLP and DGGE were used to explore how and when bacterial communities change during the course of a decomposition event. General bacterial populations and more specific bacterial groups were examined. Decomposition was shown to cause significant and sequential changes in the bacterial communities within the soil, and changes in the bacterial community often correlated with visual changes in the stage of decomposition. Organisms derived from the cadavers and carcasses were able to be detected, using molecular methods, in the underlying soil throughout the decomposition period studied. There was little correlation found between decomposition stage and the presence and diversity within the specific bacterial groups investigated. Organisms contributing to the changes seen in the bacterial communities using molecular profiling methods were identified using a cloning and sequencing based technique and included soil and environment-derived bacteria, as well as carcass or cadaver-derived organisms. This research demonstrated that pig (Sus scrofa) carcass and human cadaver decomposition result in similar bacterial community changes in soil, confirming that pig carcasses are a good model for studying the microbiology of human decomposition. The inability to control for differences between donated human cadavers made understanding the human cadaver results difficult, whereas pig carcass study allowed many variables to be held constant while others were investigated. The information gained from this study about the bacteria associated with a cadaver and how the community alters over the course of decomposition may, in the future, enable the development of a forensic post mortem interval estimation tool based on these changes in the bacterial community over time. The findings in this thesis suggest that high variability between human bodies and their microflora is likely to present a challenge to the development of such a tool, but further study with emerging high-throughput molecular tools may enable identification of microbial biomarkers for this purpose.

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  • Ecological, Oceanographic and Temperature Controls on the Incorporation of Trace Elements into Globigerina Bulloides and Globoconella Inflata in the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    Marr, Julene (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Trace element ratios (Mg/Ca, Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry plus and test weight and size data are presented for two planktonic foraminiferal species, Globigerina bulloides and Globoconella inflata. These data will be used to investigate the potential of Mg/Ca ocean thermometry and other trace element proxies of past ocean chemistry using these species. Foraminifera were sampled from core-top sediments from 10 sites in the Southwest Pacific Ocean, east of New Zealand, spanning latitudes of c.33' to 54' S and temperatures of 6-19' C at 75-300 m water depth. Mg/Ca in G. bulloides correlates strongly with observed water temperatures at 200 m depth and yields a new calibration of Mg/Ca = 0.941 exp 0.0693*T (r2 = 0.95). When G. bulloides Mg/Ca data from this study are combined with previously published data for this species, a calibration of Mg/Ca = 0.998 exp 0.066*T (r2 = 0.97) is defined. Significant variability of Mg/Ca values (20-30%) was found for the four largest chambers of G. bulloides with the final chamber consistently recording the lowest Mg/Ca values. This is interpreted to reflect changes in the depth habitat towards the end of the life cycle of G. bulloides. Levels of A1 and the micronutrients Mn and Zn in G. bulloides were found to differ significantly between Subtropical and Subantarctic Water masses, suggesting these elements can potentially be used as water mass tracers. No clear relationship between Mg/Ca and temperature was observed for G.inflata. This is interpreted, in part, to reflect the ecological niche that G. inflata occupies at the base of the thermocline, coupled with the impact of heavy secondary calcite which lowers Mg/Ca values. A correlation between size normalized test weight, water temperature and seawater carbonate ion concentration is observed for G. bulloides suggesting a modern calibration that could be potentially applied for paleoceanographic reconstructions of ocean water temperature and carbonate ion concentrations. No correlation between temperature or carbonate ion was found with size normalized G. inflata test weights. However, a bimodal population of G. inflata test weights indicates a possible link between high levels of chlorophyll-a in surface waters and light G. inflata tests. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and solution-based techniques for measuring Mg/Ca in G. bulloides yield compatible results. However, this is possible only when minimal dissolution of test calcite has occurred during the reductive and dilute acid leaching stages of cleaning prior to solution analysis, or, if only the older three visible chambers are used for LA-ICP-MS analysis. LA-ICP-MS analysis is an effective method for measuring trace element/Ca values in foraminifera, especially for small sample sizes, and enables the test to be used for further geochemical analysis (e.g. boron or carbon/oxygen stable isotope analysis).

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  • Responses to censorship issues at Auckland Public Library 1920-1940

    Walker, Pauline Jean (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This report examines how historical responses to censorship issues have influenced the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology through an analysis of censorship challenges and responses at Auckland Public Library during the years 1920-1940. Sociological theories related to the development of public libraries and to the development of librarianship as a profession are considered. The Remarque case of 1929 is identified as a pivotal moment in the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology among New Zealand librarians. Three key conclusions are made. Some librarians in New Zealand during the 1920s and 1930s saw censorship as part of their role. There was tension between a public expectation that entertaining fiction should be provided by the public library and the librarian's belief that the public library's primary purpose was education and cultural advancement. Although there was some opposition to librarians as censors, New Zealand librarianship had not yet advanced towards a definite understanding that the public library should be for all. This is evidence that New Zealand librarianship was developing in much the same way as its British and American counterparts, who at this time were also negotiating the librarian's role in selection and censorship issues.

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  • I Love Ali: a Telefeature

    Arapai, Arnette Makimou (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    One man's quest to meet his idol 'Muhammad Ali', the Greatest boxer of all time...

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  • Polynomial Invariants of the Euclidean Group Action on Multiple Screws

    Crook, Deborah (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In this work, we examine the polynomial invariants of the special Euclidean group in three dimensions, SE(3), in its action on multiple screw systems. We look at the problem of finding generating sets for these invariant subalgebras, and also briefly describe the invariants for the standard actions on R^n of both SE(3) and SO(3). The problem of the screw system action is then approached using SAGBI basis techniques, which are used to find invariants for the translational subaction of SE(3), including a full basis in the one and two-screw cases. These are then compared to the known invariants of the rotational subaction. In the one and two-screw cases, we successfully derive a full basis for the SE(3) invariants, while in the three-screw case, we suggest some possible lines of approach.

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  • In Search of Effective Principal Appraisal

    Chapman, Patricia (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The board of trustees of each New Zealand state and integrated school is responsible for the performance appraisal of its principal. Empirical data on the effectiveness of the appraisal for principals and boards is scarce. This research set out to describe principal appraisal within a region containing approximately one tenth of New Zealand schools. A survey to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the 2006 appraisal was completed by the principal and/or chair of just under half the schools in the region. The results suggest four critical success factors: the way in which the appraiser is selected and their personal qualities; the fairness and clarity of the process; the specific expectations that principals and chairs have of the outcome; and the completeness and congruity of principals' and chairs' understanding of appraisal. The reported experiences were mostly positive. However, understanding and resourcing of effective practice was found to be limited. A professional external appraiser and good interpersonal chemistry are dominant contributors to a satisfying appraisal experience. A functioning process with adequate resourcing and time for evidence gathering and evaluation, appear to be important appraisal prerequisites but do not guarantee a satisfying outcome. Unsatisfying appraisal experiences can be traced to a lack of clear understanding of appraisal aims and practice, together with resources to support their development. It is further compounded by the transient nature of boards. Four key action programmes are suggested to address shortcomings and recommendations are outlined for key stakeholders.

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  • Reviving Hedonism about Well-Being: Refuting the Argument from False Pleasures and Restricting the Relevance of Intuitive 'Evidence'

    Turton, Daniel Michael (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Throughout the vast majority of its history, hedonism about well-being has been perennially unpopular (Feldman 2004). The arguments in this essay take steps towards reviving the plausibility of hedonism about well-being. The main argument currently used to refute hedonism about well-being, the Argument from False Pleasures, is shown to lack sufficient evidence to be compelling. The main evidence provided for the Argument from False Pleasures comes in the form of two thought experiments, the Experience Machine (Nozick 1974) and the Deceived Businessman (Kagan 1998). These thought experiments typically produce strong intuitive responses, which are used to directly support the Argument from False Pleasures. This essay investigates how theories of well-being are currently evaluated by moral philosophers, with a specific focus on the place our intuitions have in the process. Indeed, the major role that moral intuitions play in evaluating theories of well-being, despite their sometimes dubious epistemic credentials, leads to an in-depth enquiry into their inner workings and potential for containing normatively significant information. The investigation, which draws on the work of Woodward and Allman (2007), concludes that intuitions about unrealistic thought experiments should not play an important role in evaluating theories of well-being. Rather, they should only act as a warning sign, highlighting moral propositions for further analysis. Based on these findings, a new method for assessing theories of well-being is suggested and applied to a specific internalist account of hedonism about well-being to show how the Deceived Businessman and Experience Machine thought experiments lack normative significance, leaving the Argument from False Pleasures without sufficient evidence to be compelling. Indeed, this essay concludes that the Argument from False Pleasures should no longer be thought to provide any good reason to believe that hedonism about well-being is implausible. This result is only one step on the road to reviving hedonism about well-being, but it is a very important one.

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  • Tax and volunteering: empirical evidence to support recommendations to solve the current problems surrounding the tax treatment of volunteers’ reimbursements and honoraria in New Zealand

    Tan, Letisha; Dunbar, David; Cordery, Carolyn Joy (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    On I November 2007 the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Revenue asked for submissions on ways to simply the current law on the taxation of reimbursement and honoraria paid volunteers in the non-profit sector. A number of proposals were outlined in a Inland Revenue Department issues paper released on 1 November. This working paper presents the results of a survey of 1537 individuals and 224 organisations who replied to a web based questionnaire that was conducted in August and September 2007. The results have been used to support a number of recommendations towards simplification and clarification of current tax law.

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  • Fortran 95 for Fortran 77 Users

    Harper, J F (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    For 50 years Fortran has been a computer language used mainly by engineers and scientists (but by few computer scientists), mainly for numerical work. Five versions were standardised and are commonly referred to as f66, f77, f90, f95 and f2003 to indicate the year. F95 has superseded f90, and no f2003 compilers exist yet. These notes concentrate on f77 and f95. They are written to show f77 users a number of the f95 features that I found so useful that I gave up f77 except when writing a program for someone with no f95 compiler. Some new features make programming easier, some allow the machine to detect bugs that f77 compilers cannot, and some make programs easier to read.

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  • Sex Differences in the Relation of Aggression to Social Dominance Orientation and Right Wing Authoritarianism

    Howison, Luke (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Two general population studies examined the association of Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) and Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) with the Aggression Questionnaire, and any sex differences in this relationship. SDO and RWA were both associated with aggression; however, contradictory sex differences were found. In Study 1 (N = 270), SDO and aggression was associated for females but not males; the opposite was found in Study 2 (N = 178). A model of the relationships between SDO, RWA, sex, hostility, anger and physical aggression was constructed and evaluated for Study 1. Study 2 included additional measures including instrumental/expressive aggression, femininity/masculinity, gender group identification and sexism. SDO was related to instrumental aggression, suggesting that social dominators use aggression instrumentally. Masculinity/femininity did not have a major effect on the aggressionSDO/RWA relationship; however, gender identity mediated the relationship between sex and SDO, replicating previous challenges of the invariance hypothesis

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  • Public Spaces in Private Places: Quality Review in the Context of Family Day Care

    White, Jayne (2005)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores an encounter between public and private worlds in a family day care (home-based early childhood education) network as caregivers and coordinators took part in a process of quality review based on The Quality Journey/He Haeranga whai hua (Ministry of Education, 2000b). The coming together of these worlds into a shared framework supported the participants to investigate a range of diverse values and beliefs.

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  • The importance of Incorporating Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) into the Secondary Curriculum in Order to Minimise the Problems of Waste on South Tarawa

    Moy, Sina (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Waste is an increasing problem in Small Island States (SIDs) such as Kiribati. In Kiribati the major concern is on the capital island, South Tarawa with more than 6,500 tons of solid waste generated each year. With only a tiny strip of land supporting a large population, it is no wonder it resulted as the highest population density compared to Tokyo. More than half of the Kiribati population lives on the capital, South Tarawa with an estimation of 150 people per/km^2 Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)/Environmental Education (EE) are taught through Social Studies, Science and other disciplinary subjects only in primary up to junior secondary school. The missing link of this ESD/EE can be found at the secondary level. The main aim of this research is to find out ways of incorporating ESD/EE at secondary level in order to help minimise waste issues that are present on urbanised South Tarawa. By formalising education for sustainable development/environmental education into the secondary school syllabus, it will help young citizens of Kiribati prepared as active members of society. As the Ministry of Education (NZ) states "nvironmental education provides a relevant context for identifying, exploring, and developing values and attitudes that can ensure students' active participation in maintaining and improving the quality of the local, national, and global environment."(Education for sustainability). This thesis argues that it is important to include Education for Sustainable Development into secondary school syllabus in order to help minimise the waste issues that have been experienced by the people living on South Tarawa.

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  • Local Visual Processing in High Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Scorers.

    McLean, Lisa Mae (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Reaction times for big and small letters (global and local levels) were compared and examined to see whether differences would occur between a low scoring and high scoring Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder (OCD) group. OCD patients have been shown to notice and pay more attention to small details (local bias) compared to most other populations (Shapiro, 1965; Yovel et al. 2006; Caberea et al., 2001). Although there is research supporting a local bias in OCD patients, it is unclear whether the bias occurs in the early stages of visual processing or in a later memory stage (Moritz & Wendt, 2006; Hermans et al, 2008). The study specifically examined a potential local bias for high OCD scorers in the early visual stage by manipulating perceptual and attentional mechanisms in two hierarchical letter tasks (Navon, 1977; Miller, 1981a, Plaisted et al. 1999). In Experiment 1, participants were told which level (the big or small letter) to respond to, results showed that high OCD scorers responded faster to local letters, showing support for a local processing advantage. Conversely, the low OCD group responded quicker to the global level. The finding of a local advantage in Experiment 1 suggests that the local advantage may be due to perceptual mechanisms as attention was already directed to the relevant level. However, in Experiment 2 where attention was not directed and the image quality was manipulated, local and global advantage effects were not replicated for the high and low OCD groups respectively. This showed that attentional and perceptual mechanisms did not make one level easier to process over the other. Therefore, it is possible that any local bias for OCD patients occurs in a later processing stage.

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  • The Effect of Music Therapy on Self-Reported Affect in Hospitalised Paediatric Patients

    Armstrong, Ruth Elizabeth (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The present research examines the effect of music therapy on the affect of hospitalised children. It took place on a paediatric ward of a New Zealand public hospital. This study aimed to investigate the role of music therapy in addressing patients' psychosocial needs. Literature on the impact of hospitalisation, and on the use of music therapy in hospitals and paediatrics was reviewed. The research involved an audit of the therapist's clinical notes from music therapy sessions over the course of seven months. The clinical notes included measurements of children's mood from the beginning and end of sessions, using McGrath's (1990) Affective Facial Scale. It was hypothesised that mood measures following music therapy would be higher than pre-music therapy scores. Statistical analysis of the facial scale data did not show a significant difference between 'before' and 'after' measures. These results were discussed with regard to a ceiling effect (this is, the measurements indicated patients were at the happy end of the scale before the music therapy session, so there was little room on the scale for mood to improve following music therapy). The measurement of emotion did not prove to be straightforward. The hospital environment may have influenced the patients' responses in a number of ways. These environmental influences are discussed with reference to examples from the clinical notes. The usefulness of facial scales in this context is discussed, as well as other limitations of the research. Suggestions for future research include the use of other mood measures, and the inclusion of measurements of parental mood and how this affects the child.

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  • Paradigms on Indigenous Language Revitalisation: the Case of Te Reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile

    Gallegos, Carina (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The existence of systems of indigenous knowledge depend greatly on the existence of indigenous languages. Processes of language revitalisation seek to uphold indigenous knowledge by restoring endangered indigenous languages. Historical processes of colonisation and globalisation in Chile and Aotearoa New Zealand have impacted and threatened each country's indigenous language. This dissertation describes language revitalisation processes of te reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile in order to further understand the implications of language on effectively revitalising indigenous culture and knowledge. The research and analysis presented implements comparative methodology through the use of case studies, direct observations, primary and secondary data sources. In an effort to evaluate and compare outcomes of indigenous language revitalisation schemes of te reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile, this thesis focuses on case studies in the context of how education programmes in each country approach indigenous language revitalisation.

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  • User-Interface Metaphors in Theory and Practice

    Barr, Pippin (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    User-interface metaphors are a widely used, but poorly understood, technique employed in almost all graphical user-interfaces. Although considerable research has gone into the applications of the technique, little work has been performed on the analysis of the concept itself. In this thesis, user-interface metaphor is defined and classified in considerable detail so as to make it more understandable to those who use it. The theoretical approach is supported by practical exploration of the concepts developed.

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