111 results for Scholarly text, Modify

  • Using BIM to calculate accurate building material quantities for early design phase Life Cycle Assessment

    Berg, Brian (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research simplifies the calculation of the Initial Embodied Energy (iEE) for commercial office buildings. The result is the improved integration of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) assessments of building materials into the early stages of the building design process (sketch design). This maximises the effectiveness of implementing design solutions to lower a building’s environmental impact. This thesis research proposes that building Information Models (BIM) will make calculating building material quantities easier, to simplify LCA calculations, all to improve their integration into existing sketch design phase practices, and building design decisions. This is achieved by developing a methodology for using BIM LCA tools to calculate highly detailed material quantities from a simple BIM model of sketch design phase building information. This is methodology is called an Initial Embodied Energy Building Information Model Life Cycle Assessment Building Performance Sketch (iEE BIM LCA BPS). Using this methodology calculates iEE results that are accurate, and represent a sufficient proportion (complete) of a building’s total iEE consumption, making them useful for iEE decision-making. iEE is one example of a LCA-based indicator that was used to test, and prove the feasibility of the iEE BIM LCA BPS methodology. Proving this, the research method tests the accuracy that a BIM model can calculate case study building’s building material quantities. This included developing; a methodology for how to use the BIM tool Revit to calculate iEE; a functional definition of an iEE BIM LCA BPS based on the environmental impact, and sketch design decisions effecting building materials, and elements; and an EE simulation calibration accuracy assessment methodology, complete with a function definition of the accuracy required of an iEE simulation to ensure it’s useful for sketch design decision-making. Two main tests were conducted as part of proving the iEE BIM LCA BPS’ feasibility. Test one assessed and proved that the iEE BIM LCA BPS model based on sketch design information does represent a sufficient proportion (complete) of a building’s total iEE consumption, so that are useful for iEE decision-making. This was tested by comparing the building material quantities from a SOQ (SOQ) produced to a sketch design level of detail (truth model 3), to an as-built level of detail, defined as current iEE best practices (truth model 1). Subsequent to proving that the iEE BIM LCA BPS is sufficiently complete, test two assessed if a BIM model and tool could calculate building material quantities accurately compared to truth model 3. The outcome was answering the research question of, how detailed does a BIM model need to be to calculate accurate building material quantities for a building material LCA (LCA) assessment? The inference of this thesis research is a methodology for using BIM models to calculate the iEE of New Zealand commercial office buildings in the early phases of the design process. The outcome was that a building design team’s current level of sketch design phase information is sufficiently detailed for sketch design phase iEE assessment. This means, that iEE and other LCA-based assessment indicators can be integrated into a design team’s existing design process, practices, and decisions, with no restructuring required.

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  • The Two Faces of Ascorbate: Prooxidant Activity and Radio-Sensitisation

    Carson, Georgia (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Although not recommended by mainstream oncologists, intravenous injections of pharmacological ascorbate are currently an alternative therapy option for cancer patients. Research has not yet determined whether high-dose ascorbate interacts favourably with radiation therapy to increase DNA damage, and therefore cell death in cancer. Some studies suggest that ascorbate can act as a prooxidant and increase the cytotoxic effect of irradiation in vitro. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a primary brain astrocytoma that is highly therapy resistant, so patients would be advantaged if ascorbate radiosensitised their cancer. In this investigation, flow cytometry and single cell gel electrophoresis (comet tail assay) were used to measure three indicators of DNA damage in GBM cells in response to ascorbate and irradiation, and were contrasted with immunofluorescence-revealed DNA damage from an intracranial mouse model of GBM. The pro-oxidant, radiosensitisation role of ascorbate was confirmed, as measured by H2AX, 8OHdG, and DSBs in vitro. With all three of these markers of DNA damage, combinations of irradiation and ascorbate had increased damage compared with individual treatments. However preliminary in vivo evidence indicates that increased DNA damage did not occur in an animal model of GBM, and in fact ascorbate may protect from DNA damage in an in vivo context. These findings complement previous results from our lab, and serve to fill in gaps in knowledge specifically around the DNA damaging effects of ascorbate. The unique nature of the brain environment, as enclosed by the blood brain barrier, prevents translation of data from other non-brain cancer studies, as such, this investigation also contributes to the exploration of a much needed avenue of research. Considering the context of ascorbate treatment as a potentially harmful currently used adjuvant, it is imperative to confirm or disprove its efficacy in a clinically relevant environment.

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  • Who knows what and who has the rights to know it?: Knowledge and reality construction in interaction

    Edmonds, David (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Knowledge has been at the centre of philosophical and scientific enquiry for centuries. It remains a topic of central importance in psychology. The current thesis examined how knowledge was managed and treated as relevant by speakers in social interaction in situ. Complaint calls to a dispute resolution telephone helpline service were studied using discursive psychology and conversation analysis as theoretical and methodological frameworks. The thesis focused on how knowledge was implicated in the accomplishment of the institutional task of jointly establishing the facts of the complaint. In particular, the research examined how the issues of ‘who knows what’ and ‘who has the rights to know it’ were demonstrably relevant for speakers in these interactions. The empirical work focused on two types of question-answer sequences. In cases where some requested information was not forthcoming or not immediately provided, callers’ conduct displayed their orientations to a normative expectation that they knew what was asked for and that they had an obligation to provide it. A second set of cases was a collection of declarative requests for confirmation. The different types of responses to such questions were described. It was proposed that the responses could be placed along a continuum, by the extent to which they asserted a caller’s epistemic rights to knowledge about the relevant information. The thesis contributed to existing research by drawing together recent conversation analytic work on epistemics as a domain of organization in social interaction, and more established discursive psychological work on reality construction. The thesis highlighted the practical nature of knowledge, as it was relevant for accomplishing a key institutional task, and other actions, in telephone-mediated dispute resolution.

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  • Directing: A Mirror to Solo Performance Provocation, Collaboration and Proxy Audience

    Richards, Sally (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Solo performance is a challenging, immediate and exhilarating form of theatre. Its popularity in the field of westernised contemporary theatre is evidenced in the increasing programming of solo performances at international festivals and in commercial theatres. However, whilst there is considerable analysis of the genre of solo performance there is little examination of the relationship between director and solo performer in the rehearsal room. Prior research has focused on the theoretical or on the practical, but rarely have the two approaches actively engaged with each other. This thesis contributes a much-needed analysis of directing practice in this area, and an integration of theory and practice that offers tangible approaches in the rehearsal room. In what ways can the director best serve the solo performer to create a theatrical experience that can hold the audience's attention, imagination and memory? Solo performance is characterised by a heightened presence in both performer and audience, incited by a minimalism that abandons the theatrical premise of artifice and turns to primary storytelling. The rehearsal room relationship between director and solo performer also shares these qualities, heightened and focused by the one-one engagements. Directing in this context contrasts from that of a multi-cast, with distinctly different dynamics arising from an artistic collaboration between two people, rather than with many. This thesis considers how the director is placed as a flexible paradigm as proxy audience and as a bidirectional-mirroring device in the rehearsal process – situating the director as an articulated reflection to the transforming solo performer. I analyse this unique partnership and focus primarily on strategies that directors use to create effective solo performance. This thesis is comprised of 80% critical writing and 20% for the creative/practice-based research project. I examine the particular qualities of solo performance as a genre; its theatrical origins, function and purpose, the scope of styles and forms and its potential for political and social meaning. However, my focus is on the rehearsal room processes, working predominantly with a director, rather than an analysis of the end product - the performance. I interview practitioners in the field about their rehearsal room experiences, across the spectrum of styles and forms of solo performance. My theoretical framework is centred on Practice as Research (PaR). In order to scrutinise the relationship between director and solo performer I have gained access to the rehearsal room as both director/practitioner and researcher. The PaR component of this thesis includes the analysis of the experimental rehearsal process and performance of PocaHAUNTus - a new autobiographical solo play. In addition I draw on a body of retrospective work – re-examining my direction of five solo performances that occurred prior to this thesis. Production journals, rehearsal and performance footage, interviews, communications and photographs evidence all components. My research question is not simply “Does a solo performer need a director?” Instead, my research pursues how the relationship between the two might be negotiated, asking: “In what ways can the director best serve the solo performer?” The research examines the fundamental challenges of the genre, namely: the delineation of multiple characters by a single performer, immediacy of the audience relationship to the lone performer, stage geography and scenographic choices. The research also identifies and refines practical strategies to accommodate the intensity of working one-on-one. At its best, the director-solo performer relationship is a vibrant and supportive partnership but because of its intimacy, it is often also a complex and challenging engagement. The contribution of this thesis and its originality is in a PaR model that utilises my past experience of directing solo performance, expands on this foundation through the collection of extensive interview material from a diverse range of significant directors and performers of solo work, and then pursues a new creative laboratory where I test key approaches to directing solo performance.

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  • Learning Feature Selection and Combination Strategies for Generic Salient Object Detection

    Naqvi, Syed (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    For a diverse range of applications in machine vision from social media searches to robotic home care providers, it is important to replicate the mechanism by which the human brain selects the most important visual information, while suppressing the remaining non-usable information. Many computational methods attempt to model this process by following the traditional model of visual attention. The traditional model of attention involves feature extraction, conditioning and combination to capture this behaviour of human visual attention. Consequently, the model has inherent design choices at its various stages. These choices include selection of parameters related to the feature computation process, setting a conditioning approach, feature importance and setting a combination approach. Despite rapid research and substantial improvements in benchmark performance, the performance of many models depends upon tuning these design choices in an ad hoc fashion. Additionally, these design choices are heuristic in nature, thus resulting in good performance only in certain settings. Consequentially, many such models exhibit low robustness to difficult stimuli and the complexities of real-world imagery. Machine learning and optimisation technique have long been used to increase the generalisability of a system to unseen data. Surprisingly, artificial learning techniques have not been investigated to their full potential to improve generalisation of visual attention methods. The proposed thesis is that artificial learning can increase the generalisability of the traditional model of visual attention by effective selection and optimal combination of features. The following new techniques have been introduced at various stages of the traditional model of visual attention to improve its generalisation performance, specifically on challenging cases of saliency detection: 1. Joint optimisation of feature related parameters and feature importance weights is introduced for the first time to improve the generalisation of the traditional model of visual attention. To evaluate the joint learning hypothesis, a new method namely GAOVSM is introduced for the tasks of eye fixation prediction. By finding the relationships between feature related parameters and feature importance, the developed method improves the generalisation performance of baseline method (that employ human encoded parameters). 2. Spectral matting based figure-ground segregation is introduced to overcome the artifacts encountered by region-based salient object detection approaches. By suppressing the unwanted background information and assigning saliency to object parts in a uniform manner, the developed FGS approach overcomes the limitations of region based approaches. 3. Joint optimisation of feature computation parameters and feature importance weights is introduced for optimal combination of FGS with complementary features for the first time for salient object detection. By learning feature related parameters and their respective importance at multiple segmentation thresholds and by considering the performance gaps amongst features, the developed FGSopt method improves the object detection performance of the FGS technique also improving upon several state-of-the-art salient object detection models. 4. The introduction of multiple combination schemes/rules further extends the generalisability of the traditional attention model beyond that of joint optimisation based single rules. The introduction of feature composition based grouping of images, enables the developed IGA method to autonomously identify an appropriate combination strategy for an unseen image. The results of a pair-wise ranksum test confirm that the IGA method is significantly better than the deterministic and classification based benchmark methods on the 99% confidence interval level. Extending this line of research, a novel relative encoding approach enables the adapted XCSCA method to group images having similar saliency prediction ability. By keeping track of previous inputs, the introduced action part of the XCSCA approach enables learning of generalised feature importance rules. By more accurate grouping of images as compared with IGA, generalised learnt rules and appropriate application of feature importance rules, the XCSCA approach improves upon the generalisation performance of the IGA method. 5. The introduced uniform saliency assignment and segmentation quality cues enable label free evaluation of a feature/saliency map. By accurate ranking and effective clustering, the developed DFS method successfully solves the complex problem of finding appropriate features for combination (on an-image-by-image basis) for the first time in saliency detection. The DFS method enables ground truth free evaluation of saliency methods and advances the state-of-the-art in data driven saliency aggregation by detection and deselection of redundant information. The final contribution is that the developed methods are formed into a complete system where analysis shows the effects of their interactions on the system. Based on the saliency prediction accuracy versus computational time trade-off, specialised variants of the proposed methods are presented along with the recommendations for further use by other saliency detection systems. This research work has shown that artificial learning can increase the generalisation of the traditional model of attention by effective selection and optimal combination of features. Overall, this thesis has shown that it is the ability to autonomously segregate images based on their types and subsequent learning of appropriate combinations that aid generalisation on difficult unseen stimuli.

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  • How does a music therapy student work to facilitate reminiscence and memory in dementia patients

    Sun, I-Chen (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study was prompted in response to increased interest in, and demand for, music therapy provision in improving quality of care for dementia patients. It is an exploration of the strategies to facilitate memory and reminiscence in persons with dementia, and considers the need for those preparing for end of life to recall identities, connect with family and others, and express feelings. This research is a qualitative study involving secondary analysis of clinical data from my clinical practice and identifies the strategies, techniques and procedures that I applied in my clinical work to stimulate preserved memory ‘islands’. The findings show that familiarity is central in enabling a remembering process, and music can have unique ways of accessing memory in people with limited cognitive and social abilities. Eight core categories of music therapy strategies were found to be helpful in enabling memory and reminiscence. This study includes examples of both individual and group music therapy. The objective of this study was to examine my music therapy practice, and potentially provide some beneficial ideas and insights to other music therapists working on memory and reminiscence with dementia patients.

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  • Improving Clustering Methods By Exploiting Richness Of Text Data

    Wahid, Abdul (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Clustering is an unsupervised machine learning technique, which involves discovering different clusters (groups) of similar objects in unlabeled data and is generally considered to be a NP hard problem. Clustering methods are widely used in a verity of disciplines for analyzing different types of data, and a small improvement in clustering method can cause a ripple effect in advancing research of multiple fields. Clustering any type of data is challenging and there are many open research questions. The clustering problem is exacerbated in the case of text data because of the additional challenges such as issues in capturing semantics of a document, handling rich features of text data and dealing with the well known problem of the curse of dimensionality. In this thesis, we investigate the limitations of existing text clustering methods and address these limitations by providing five new text clustering methods--Query Sense Clustering (QSC), Dirichlet Weighted K-means (DWKM), Multi-View Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm (MMOEA), Multi-objective Document Clustering (MDC) and Multi-Objective Multi-View Ensemble Clustering (MOMVEC). These five new clustering methods showed that the use of rich features in text clustering methods could outperform the existing state-of-the-art text clustering methods. The first new text clustering method QSC exploits user queries (one of the rich features in text data) to generate better quality clusters and cluster labels. The second text clustering method DWKM uses probability based weighting scheme to formulate a semantically weighted distance measure to improve the clustering results. The third text clustering method MMOEA is based on a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. MMOEA exploits rich features to generate a diverse set of candidate clustering solutions, and forms a better clustering solution using a cluster-oriented approach. The fourth and the fifth text clustering method MDC and MOMVEC address the limitations of MMOEA. MDC and MOMVEC differ in terms of the implementation of their multi-objective evolutionary approaches. All five methods are compared with existing state-of-the-art methods. The results of the comparisons show that the newly developed text clustering methods out-perform existing methods by achieving up to 16\% improvement for some comparisons. In general, almost all newly developed clustering algorithms showed statistically significant improvements over other existing methods. The key ideas of the thesis highlight that exploiting user queries improves Search Result Clustering(SRC); utilizing rich features in weighting schemes and distance measures improves soft subspace clustering; utilizing multiple views and a multi-objective cluster oriented method improves clustering ensemble methods; and better evolutionary operators and objective functions improve multi-objective evolutionary clustering ensemble methods. The new text clustering methods introduced in this thesis can be widely applied in various domains that involve analysis of text data. The contributions of this thesis which include five new text clustering methods, will not only help researchers in the data mining field but also to help a wide range of researchers in other fields.

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  • Collaborative music therapy; Determining the benefits and challenges of collaborative work from a student’s perspective

    Macdonald, Jamie (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study describes the benefits and challenges experienced by a student music therapist on placement at a special school in New Zealand. While working alongside an experienced music therapist at the school, and taking external supervision from another, I was able to reflect the challenges and benefits of this unique collaboration. The process of collaboration is complex especially when collaborating parties have differing roles that potentially create power differentials. Findings have been generated from secondary analysis of my reflective journal and clinical data collected while on placement. The findings explore the diverse range of possible benefits and challenges of the interactions that the collaboration enabled. The study concludes that despite the many challenges in maintaining a successful collaboration, it provides therapists with many extra opportunities for our participants, as well as a flexible learning environment for a student music therapist.

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  • An investigation of foreign exchange risk management by exporting small and medium sized enterprises

    Dang, Vu (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Previous studies on foreign exchange (forex) risk management have tended to focus on multinational enterprises; while how SMEs manage their forex risk is still largely unexplored. As small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are increasingly involved in international markets, they have become a new research setting on forex risk management. Given that SMEs have limited access to resources, skills and capabilities, internal hedging techniques could be favoured by SMEs. There is limited research on this matter, and the extant literature on forex management generally considers derivatives as major hedging techniques for large firms. This thesis primarily investigates how exporting SMEs manage forex risk. In addition, approaches to forex management could be changed as a firm becomes more experienced internationally. Following the basic principles of internationalisation theory, the thesis also examines the impact of the internationalisation degree of the firm on forex management decisions. This thesis sheds new light on SMEs’ hedging practices by providing a better understanding of SMEs’ choices of forex risk management. Three research questions have been raised: (1) what determinants influence SMEs’ choice to hedge as a way of managing forex risk; (2) what strategies do SMEs use when they choose hedging to manage forex exposure; and (3) how does the degree of internationalisation impact the choice of forex management. The thesis draws on two theoretical perspectives to help address these overarching questions. It extends the use of the resource-based view (RBV), and combines this with internationalisation theory. The setting of SMEs is a context for using the RBV. New Zealand and Australian exporting SMEs provide the sample for testing the hypotheses. The contributions of this thesis are twofold. Firstly, the thesis identifies four determinants of forex risk strategy by exporting SMEs, i.e. degree of internationalisation (specifically, export ratio), forex exposure, perceived forex risk, and resources. Secondly, it extends the use of the RBV and the internationalisation theory in forex risk management of SMEs. In addition, the thesis uses a research approach combining an exploratory qualitative study and a main quantitative study.

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  • Characterising the Anthropocene: Ecological Degradation in Italian Twenty-First Century Literary Writing

    Macilenti, Alessandro (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The twenty-first century has witnessed the exacerbation of ecological issues that began to manifest themselves in the mid-twentieth century. It has become increasingly clear that the current environmental crisis poses an unprecedented existential threat to civilization as well as to Homo sapiens itself. Whereas the physical and social sciences have been defining the now inevitable transition to a different (and more inhospitable) Earth, the humanities have yet to assert their role as a transformative force within the context of global environmental change. Turning abstract issues into narrative form, literary writing can increase awareness of environmental issues as well as have a deep emotive influence on its readership. To showcase this type of writing as well as the methodological frameworks that best highlights the social and ethical relevance of such texts alongside their literary value, I have selected the following twenty-first century Italian literary works: Roberto Saviano’s Gomorra, Kai Zen’s Delta blues,Wu Ming’s Previsioni del tempo, Simona Vinci’s Rovina, Giancarlo di Cataldo’s Fuoco!, Laura Pugno’s Sirene, and Alessandra Montrucchio’s E poi la sete, all published between 2006 and 2011. The main goal of this study is to demonstrate how these works offer an invaluable opportunity to communicate meaningfully and accessibly the discomforting truths of global environmental change, including ecomafia, waste trafficking, illegal building, arson, ozone depletion, global warming and the dysfunctional relationship between humanity and the biosphere.

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  • Factors Influencing Participant Satisfaction with Free/Libre and Open Source Software Projects

    Chawner, Brenda (2011)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The purpose of this research was to identify factors that affect participants’ satisfaction with their experience of a free/libre open source software (FLOSS) project. The research built on existing models of user satisfaction from the information systems literature, and also incorporated two characteristics of FLOSS projects first identified by Ye, Nakakoji, Yamamoto, and Kishida (2005), product openness and process openness. The central research question it answered was, What factors influence participant satisfaction with a free/libre and open source application software project? Richard Stallman’s reasons for setting up the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation arose from his frustration at being forced to be a passive user of software used for a Xerox printer. These suggest that being able to be an active participant in a FLOSS project is one factor that should be examined, and therefore the first sub-question this project answers is, What types of contributions do participants make to free/libre and open source software projects? Several studies have shown that the extent of participation in a FLOSS project varies from individual to individual, and this variation leads to the second sub-question, Do the factors that influence satisfaction vary for different types of participation? If so, in what way? A preliminary conceptual model of factors affecting participant satisfaction was developed, reflecting the key concepts identified in the literature. The main theoretical goal of this research was to test the model using empirical data. The research used a sequential, mixed methods approach. The first, qualitative stage involved reviewing documents from selected projects and interviewing a purposive sample of FLOSS project participants. The second, quantitative stage involved an online survey of FLOSS project participants, and the data gathered were used to test the conceptual model. The results of the first stage showed that participation in FLOSS projects was a more complex construct than previously reported in the literature. Seven distinct categories of activities were identified: • use; • interaction with code; • supporting the community; • outreach; • sponsorship; • management; and • governance. Four attributes that modified these categories were also identified: organisational focus, role formality, remuneration, and time commitment. Data from 154 responses to the online survey were used to test the model using stepwise multiple regression, which determined the effect of each of the variables on overall participant satisfaction. Moderated regression analysis was used to test the effects of three potential moderating variables. The results showed that that perceived system complexity had the largest effect, decreasing satisfaction if respondents perceived that the software was complex, while project openness and perceived developer communication quality accounted for the most variance in satisfaction. The main theoretical contribution of this research lies in its extension of satisfaction studies to FLOSS communities, showing that communication and openness are more important than in conventional software projects. Its practical contribution will help people involved in the management and governance of FLOSS projects to identify ways of increasing their participants’ satisfaction, which may in turn encourage them to contribute more.

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  • Self-improvement books: A genre analysis

    Koay, Dong Liang (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The aim of the thesis is to explore the characteristics of self-improvement books as a genre. Although self-improvement books are a widely read genre, particularly in the Western world, none to my knowledge has examined the linguistic features of this genre in detail. The thesis draws on the three main schools of genre theory: English for Specific Purposes, Systemic Functional Linguistics, and the New Rhetoric, and begins by investigating the sections (e.g., acknowledgement, introduction chapter) in self-improvement books and the typicality of the sections. Focusing on three sections: introduction chapters, body chapters, and about the author sections, the thesis examines how authors structure the sections by analysing the moves and steps. This study also examines the stories in self-improvement books by analysing the purpose of the stories and their structure. Stories were chosen because they seemed to be a feature of self-improvement books based on my observation and as suggested by interview data. To analyse self-improvement books at a register level, the thesis examines the most unambiguous aspects of engagement: personal pronouns focusing on you, imperative clauses, and questions. It also examines the lexicogrammatical features of self-improvement book titles and compares them to the titles of historical biographies, showing that imperative clauses and ing-clause are found only in self-improvement book titles. Drawing on interview data and literature on the American Dream, American individualism, Neoliberalism, and New Age beliefs, the thesis explains how the linguistic characteristics of the genre of self-improvement books reflect these ideologies. The dataset for the study is 40 self-improvement books, selected on the basis of a set of criteria that I developed. Subsets were selected from the main dataset for specific analyses. The text analysis part of the study is supplemented by interview data from specialist informants, who come from three categories: readers of the genre, non-readers of the genre, and authors of the genre. Move analysis identifies obligatory rhetorical moves and indicates that the main purposes of introduction chapters and about the author sections are persuading readers to read the book, and establishing credibility, respectively. Authors always persuade readers to read their books by listing reasons to read them. To demonstrate authors’ credibility, they refer to their areas of expertise. Unlike the introduction chapters and about the author sections, the body chapters have more than one obligatory rhetorical move. The body chapters present the problem that readers potentially experience, present the authors’ message, recommend practical applications, and encourage readers to apply them. From a genre perspective, the purpose of all the stories in my analysis is to illustrate the authors’ message. Register analysis, and drawing on interview data, suggests that authors use the personal pronoun you, imperative clauses, and questions to engage readers. The abundance of the personal pronoun you suggests that self-improvement books are a reader-oriented genre. The analysis of the imperative clauses using Halliday’s process types suggests that the main way to improve our lives, the authors recommend, is to change how we think. Finally, my thesis shows that the social purpose of self-improvement books is to help potential readers improve their lives, and the approach of improving one’s life has an individualistic orientation.

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  • First Principles Study of Ga₍₂₀₋x₎Alx⁺ Nanoalloys: Structure, Thermodynamics and Phase Diagram

    Ojha, Udbhav (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Nanoalloys (a finite framework of two or more metal atoms) represent a rapidly growing field owing to the possibilities of tuning its properties as desired for various applications. Their properties are size, shape, composition, chemical ordering, and temperature dependent, thereby offering a large playground for varied research motivations. This thesis documents the investigations on how the addition of aluminium affects the cationic gallium clusters, both in terms of geometric & electronic structure and thermodynamics, which have been observed to show greater-than-bulk melting behaviour for small sizes. A specific cluster size of 20 atoms is selected, Ga₍₂₀₋x₎Alx⁺, with the overall intention of creating a phase diagram which is the most reliable way to predict the phase changes in the system. All the first principles (density functional theory) based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics calculations have been performed in the microcanonical ensemble. Melting behaviour is first studied in the pure Al₂₀⁺ clusters and then in three representative clusters of Ga₍₂₀₋x₎Alx⁺ series: Ga₁₉Al⁺, Ga₁₁Al₉⁺ and Ga₃Al₁₇⁺ clusters. We observe that all the three nanoalloy compositions show greater-than-bulk melting behaviour behaviour as well and in Ga₁₉Al⁺, specifically, Al prefers the internal sites, contrary to the previous arguments. We go on to complete the solid-liquid-like melting phase diagram using the calculated information and further propose a model of these greater-than-bulk melting clusters to be components of the corresponding bulk phases, whether metals or alloys, with additional size-dependent contributions added to it.

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  • Science Museum in a Pizza Box - Performance, museum tour guiding, and science communication

    Fontana, Michele (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study focuses on the relationship between performance and museum tour guiding. Building on the analysis of this relationship, the author of this study has created a performance that is inspired by museum guided tours. The aim of the performance is to encourage a critical reflection on the role and the function of science in contemporary society, while giving insight into how science is socially constructed. The performance is based on participation. The participants define their own experiences, actively reflecting on the value that science has in their lives through a dialogue with the other participants and the performer. This dialogue starts with exhibits based on science that are presented to the participants. To develop this performance, this research has utilised action research, and qualitative methods to explore the participants’ experiences of the performance. This study is interdisciplinary, and connects performance studies, museum studies and science communication, while using applied research to explore its topics. The outcomes of this study are an innovative conceptualisation of the museum guided tour, and an original approach to science communication based on dialogic, live performance.

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  • An age-old issue: Evaluating the applicability of adult criminal risk assessment tools for use with youth offenders

    Ferguson, Anna (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research has consistently recognized that youth and adults share risk factors for crime, although whether certain factors are of increased importance during adolescence is debated. The present research evaluated the extent to which two risk assessment tools could predict criminal and breach reconviction in a matched sample of youth (aged 17-19) and adult (aged 20-60) community- supervised offenders: The Dynamic Risk Assessment for Offender Re-entry (DRAOR) and the static Risk of re-Conviction X Risk of re-Imprisonment (RoC*RoI). Cox regression and AUC analyses revealed initial DRAOR scores had mixed predictive validity for both groups, while proximal risk scores showed comparably moderate to high accuracy for youth and adults. Protective scores were consistently poor predictors for adults. The proximal assessment predicted reconviction better than the initial assessment, and decreases in risk scores between assessments were associated with a reduction in the likelihood of reconviction, showing the value in monitoring risk and updating assessment. The RoC*RoI predicted criminal reconviction for adults but did not predict either reconviction outcome for youth. These findings support the use of the DRAOR for identifying which youth and adults are likely to reoffend, and suggest that dynamic factors might be more useful predictors than static for assessing and monitoring youth offenders.

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  • Tauhi Vā Māfana: Tongan leadership and culture in the New Zealand Public Service

    Paea, Mele Katea (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    How does knowledge of cultural practices help us think differently about how leadership is understood and practised in a particular context? This thesis presents a Tongan leadership model from a Tongan perspective. It is based on a study of cultural practices that shape the ways in which Tongans perceive and experience leadership differently. The location of the study is the New Zealand Public Service, and the approach taken here is to reflect on Tongan leadership from a strength-based perspective, promoting the leadership capabilities that Tongans bring with them into another cultural context. The core of this thesis is a deep empirical study of Tongan leadership based on Tongan public servants’ perceptions and experiences of Tongan identity and Tongan leadership practices in New Zealand. The theoretical framework is based primarily on a Tauhi Vā (nurturing relationships) approach that draws on sources, which explore and discuss the key conceptual foundations of Tongan culture. It draws on the central value of māfana (warm love/inner warm passion) as the driver for leadership as Tauhi Vā Māfana (nurturing warm relationships). The thesis also argues that the methodology for exploring leadership as cultural practice should be located in the cultural practices being studied. It further explores the research question, what is the most culturally appropriate way to study leadership as cultural practice? In this case, the methodology for this study is therefore grounded in a Tongan perspective called Talanoa Māfana (talking about the truth in love/warm relationships). This is based on a type of ‘oral communication’, carried out in both group and individual contexts. The thesis set out to build on existing talanoa methodology to develop Talanoa Māfana providing new insights into cultural practice as methodology alongside cultural practice as the topic of study. The study first asked participants what ‘being Tongan’ meant to them and what their experiences of leadership were. Moving into the public service context, it asked how their Tongan identities shaped their work in the New Zealand Public Service, and how they would like to see their leadership practices supported in this context. Drawing on the findings, this study conceptualises Tongan leadership as Tauhi Vā Māfana. It is based on the dynamic interplay between fāmili (familial relationships), māfana, fua fatongia (fulfilling obligations), and faka`apa`apa (sacred wisdom) within a given socio-cultural context. Tauhi Vā Māfana presents leadership as a cultural practice of nurturing warm relationships, in which people are influenced to change in a given context. This concept describes the types of leadership capabilities that Tongan participants bring to the New Zealand Public Service and goes on to explore the challenges that they face in trying to act on these capabilities in a non-Tongan cultural context. This thesis presents a Tongan model of leadership, and so brings to the wider leadership literature an empirical study that considers leadership as cultural practice. It is part of the emerging wider conversation about the importance of understanding leadership in terms of how people perceive and experience it from within their own socio-cultural backgrounds and in specific contexts. It challenges leadership scholars and practitioners to think about how they could use the knowledge of cultural practices to understand and utilise leadership differently, in the face of the dominance of Western leadership models. This study is also a wider invitation to consider the relevance of its themes and methodology to developing alternatives to organisational research based on Western perspectives, such as the emerging literature on Pacific and indigenous perspectives.

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  • A dual-trap optical tweezer approach to study emulsion droplet interactions

    Griffiths, Marjorie (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Foods are a highly complex form of soft condensed matter. Their complexity arises from a number of interrelated factors including the natural heterogeneity of raw materials, intricate composition, and the subtle changes in molecular interactions and micro-structural arrangements dictated by food processing and storage. It is highly important to understand the forces dictating the food structure as the assembly and organisation of major structural entities (i.e biopolymers, droplets, bubbles, networks, and particles) are responsible for the foods stability, texture, flow properties and more inclusively their organoleptic properties. The structural entities of foods exhibit numerous forms of self-organization and have significant structure complexity and dynamic behaviour on the mesoscopic length scales from 10 to 1000 nanometres. These dynamic weak interactions between the constituents define the organized state that ranges from simple spatial or temporal ordering to more intricate interactions making up the food microstructure. These interactions are often small in magnitude and are short ranged making them difficult to measure directly. Very few studies have been carried out on direct force measurements in foodstuffs. The focus of this research was to develop a dual-trap optical tweezer method to directly measure interactions between micrometre colloidal particles and ultimately to design an apparatus where interactions between less homogeneous systems, such as emulsion droplets could directly measured as a function of separation. As the name suggests, optical tweezers provide the ability to control the position of particles using a focused laser beam. The general concept of this method is to immobilise two particles in two separate optical traps and step one particle closer to the other stationary particle in a controlled fashion. The droplet’s movement is then recorded using a high-speed camera that provides near-to-real-time images of the particle’s positions. The particle’s positions are determined by a 3-D tracking algorithm developed in-house which determines the position of both particles to a precision of sub-pixel accuracy. The force exerted on each droplet (by the other one) can be extracted as it is proportional to the trap strength (pN/μm) and the displacement of the particle from the centre of the optical trap (μm). To demonstrate the optical tweezer method,the interactions between silica beads of a known size were measured as a function of bead separation. The measured force-distance curves agreed with the electrostatic component of the DLVO theory. Once the method was established it was applied at increasing salt concentrations (decreasing Debye lengths). Interestingly, a salt concentration was found beyond which the experimental data no longer agreed with the predictions of DVLO theory. Above 100 μM sodium chloride the Debye length was reduced to less than the Brownian fluctuations of the particles in the traps, which then dominated the apparent repulsion by restricting their particle trajectories, masking the actual nature of the electrostatic interactions. This resulted in force curves which fitted the exponential function, however, the fitted decay constant bore no resemblance to the actual Debye length. A diffusion experiment was designed to demonstrate the ability to measure interactions in multiple environments using the same pair of beads (at low salt concentrations where Debye lengths are faithfully recovered). The evolution of force-displacement curves was measured as the local salt concentration changed owing to the diffusion of salt from the interface and the results obtained were shown to agree with predictions based on a standard diffusion formalism. Applying the dual-trap optical tweezers method, successfully demonstrated with silica beads, to less homogeneous systems such as emulsion droplets presented challenges which showcased that emulsion design was critical as certain criteria had to be met in order to facilitate undertaking the tweezer experiments. These criteria include particle size (1-3 μm ), low polydispersity, and a reasonable refractive index mismatch between the droplet and continuous phase. In keeping with food systems a protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsion was chosen. Two popular emulsifiers, sodium caseinate and β-lactoglobulin, were investigated at different ionic strength, pH and homogenisation pressures and phase volumes. The emulsion chosen for direct force measurements was a sodium caseinate emulsion when prepared in a 100 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.0, 60 wt. % soya bean oil and 0.04 wt.% protein which provided an adequate droplet size with minimal polydispersity. Interactions between pairs of sodium caseinate emulsion droplets were measured. Unlike for silica beads, the individual droplet size needed to be measured to deter- mine the surface-to-surface separation of droplet pairs. The droplet’s diameter was determined by measuring the restricted diffusion of the droplet in a weak optical trap and fitting the short time mean squared displacement behaviour to a Brownian motion simulation. It was found that the droplet size can be determined in this fashion to within 50 nm. Moving forward, the interactions between pairs of emulsion droplets were measured in water using the same method gleaned from the silica bead interaction study. The experimental data fitted well to the electrostatic force described by the DLVO theory with reasonable ζ-potentials extracted. To further demonstrate this dual optical tweezer method, interactions between the same pair of droplets were measured at increasing NaCl concentrations by means of diffusion. The expected trend has found to agree from calculations of increased local salt concentration based on a diffusion equation. At salt concentrations above 100 μm significant deviations in the force-curves were observed that may signal salt induced changes of the droplet’s interface or be attributed to the small magnitude of the force being within the noise. This warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the dual-trap optical tweezers have shown incredible potential to become a robust method to measure the interactions between droplets. This method has some clear advantages over current methods including that force, and spatial resolution is superior, sample preparation is straightforward, forces are measured in 3-dimensions, and the droplets are free in solution during measurement, not wetted on surfaces. Accordingly, dual-trap optical tweezer methodology has provided the ability to measure interactions to a precision that has not yet been achieved by any other method for the study of emulsion systems, which in itself is a major achievement. This method is another tool in the toolbox of a colloid chemist, food scientist and physicists to probe interactions in soft materials.

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  • Impact of Environmental Stressors on the Metabolic Functioning of a Temperate Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    Bone, Oliver (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses occur across a wide latitudinal range, from temperate to tropical locations in both hemispheres. In the tropics, this association provides the foundation for the development of highly diverse coral reef ecosystems. Tropical associations are particularly sensitive to thermal variability, however, leading to dysfunction of the relationship and eventual expulsion of the symbiont, known as ‘coral bleaching’. In contrast, temperate associations maintain stable symbiotic relationships in highly fluctuating thermal environments. The reason behind the relative thermal tolerance of temperate associations is still unclear, though the ability to maintain cellular homeostasis through adjustments to metabolic processes is likely a core feature of their resilience. Both a field study and laboratory experiment were conducted to determine the metabolic responses to thermal change of the symbiosis between the temperate anemone Anthopleura aureoradiata and the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium. For the field component, A. aureoradiata were collected from Point Halswell in Wellington Harbour in both summer and winter. For the laboratory experiment, specimens collected at Pautahanui inlet were thermally acclimated in the laboratory, after which temperatures were altered over the course of one week to either 8°C (cold) or 28°C (hot) and maintained at these temperatures for six weeks. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was then employed to determine the identity and relative quantity of a wide range of metabolites involved in primary metabolism including organic acids, fatty acids, amino acids and sugars. Based on these data, pathway activity profiling was used to determine the activity of different metabolic pathways both between seasons and in response to cold and heat treatment. A wide range of changes to metabolic processes were observed in both host and symbiont. Photosynthetic capacity was reduced in the symbionts at low temperatures and increased at high temperatures. The only organic acid to be significantly impacted was propanedioic acid, which increased in the host in response to cold treatment, potentially related to increased translocation from the symbiont. Altered fatty acid content in both host and symbiont was related to the role of fatty acids as energy sources and storage compounds and in cell signalling processes. Changes in fatty acid-associated metabolic pathways were exemplified by arachidonic acid and linoleic acid metabolism. Alterations to free amino acids and amino acid related pathways in both host and symbiont were associated with their role as antioxidants and osmoprotectants and the catabolism of amino acids for the production of energy. In symbionts only, altered amino acid content was associated with the role of amino acids in the production of alkaloids. Changes in a number of sugar derivatives in both host and symbiont were associated with their role as antioxidants and osmoprotectants. Altered sugar metabolism in the symbiont clearly indicated an increase in the production of energy rich sugar molecules and production of cellular energy in summer/hot conditions and a decrease in winter/cold conditions. Notably impacted pathways included the Calvin cycle, glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidative phosphorylation. Patterns of sugar related pathway activity in the host were generally opposite to that observed in the symbiont. Overall, prominent but opposing changes in the host and symbiont were detected in the central carbohydrate and energy metabolic pathways. In general, the activity of these pathways increased in the host in winter/cold conditions and decreased in summer/hot conditions, while in the symbiont the pattern was the opposite. These findings highlight the role of metabolic processes in enabling the persistence of a temperate cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis in the face of large temperature fluctuations. This work provides a foundation upon which a deeper understanding of metabolic functioning in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis can be built and provides a comparative platform for studies of the more thermally sensitive tropical associations.

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  • Spatial and temporal regulation of cytokine expression in Type 2 immune responses

    Kyle, Ryan (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Type 2 immune responses are generated to provide protection against parasitic helminth infections, however these responses also cause the pathologies associated with allergic inflammation. Studies of the cell types and signalling pathways that mediate Type 2 immune responses have been previously undertaken with the goals of efficient development of vaccines against helminths, and identification of pathways that can be inhibited to decrease the damage caused by allergic inflammation. The cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) mediate many of the downstream effector functions of the Type 2 immune response. To study the mechanisms that control expression of these two cytokines I have used a novel dual cytokine IL-4 and IL-13 transgenic reporter mouse. Utilising this tool along with other IL-4 reporter mice I have discovered that the amount of T cell receptor (TCR) signalling modulates the allelic expression of IL-4 by CD4⁺ T cells. The transgenic IL-4 reporter mouse has for the first time allowed independent measurement of the effects of IL-4 deficiency on the expression of IL-4 in vivo. Using this system I have found that IL- 4 is not required for the in vivo generation or expansion of IL-4 producing CD4⁺ T cells. Th2 differentiated CD4⁺ T cells also expresses IL-13, however the dual reporter mice have demonstrated that IL-13 is expressed consistently later than IL-4 in vitro, and IL-13 requires constant, or multiple exposures to TCR stimulus for expression to be induced. IL-13 expression is absent from lymph node CD4⁺ T cells during exposure to allergens or helminth infection. Sequestration of CD4⁺ T cells in the lymph node does not impact the number of IL-13 expressing CD4⁺ T cells in the lung during a helminth infection, indicating that adaptive immune cell derived IL-13 may be entirely produced by lung resident cells not requiring transit through the lymph node. I have characterised a population of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) within the skin and found that the proportion of these cells that constitutively express IL-13 decreases with age. These cells did not drastically change in numbers or IL-13 responses in a range of inflammatory conditions including a model of atopic dermatitis. Basophils were found to respond to the atopic dermatitis model by migrating specifically to the treated skin site and draining lymph node, and producing IL-4 in a thymic stromal lymphopoietin dependant manner. Treatment with exogenous cytokines induced IL-13 expression from group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) in the lung and these cells promoted protective immune responses against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection. The immune response generated during a primary infection by Nippostrongylus brasiliensis provides protection from re-infection. Long-term protection is dependent on CD4⁺ T cells but when sufficiently stimulated by cytokine, ILC2s can rescue the protection lost by the depletion of CD4⁺ T cells. This thesis has shown that CD4⁺ T cells and populations of innate immune cells differentially regulate the expression of the closely related Type 2 cytokines IL-4 and IL- 13. These discoveries will help direct future research aiming to boost the effectiveness of anti-helminth vaccines, or decrease the pathology caused by allergic diseases by targeting specific cytokine expression.

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  • Investigating the optimal integration of airborne, ship-borne, satellite and terrestrial gravity data for use in geoid determination

    Winefield, Rachelle (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Each gravity observation technique has different parameters and contributes to different pieces of the gravity spectrum. This means that no one gravity dataset is able to model the Earth’s gravity field completely and the best gravity map is one derived from many sources. Therefore, one of the challenges in gravity field modelling is combining multiple types of heterogeneous gravity datasets. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal method to produce a single gravity map of the Canterbury case study area, for the purposes of use in geoid modelling. This objective is realised through the identification and application of a four-step integration process: purpose, data, combination and assessment. This includes the evaluation of three integration methods: natural neighbour, ordinary kriging and least squares collocation. As geoid modelling requires the combination of gravity datasets collected at various altitudes, it is beneficial to be able to combine the dataset using an integration method which operates in a three-dimensional space. Of the three integration methods assessed, least squares collocation is the only integration method which is able to perform this type of reduction. The resulting product is a Bouguer anomaly map of the Canterbury case study area, which combines satellite altimetry, terrestrial, ship-borne, airborne, and satellite gravimetry using least squares collocation.

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