169 results for Scholarly text, 2007

  • Fortran 95 for Fortran 77 Users

    Harper, J F (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    For 50 years Fortran has been a computer language used mainly by engineers and scientists (but by few computer scientists), mainly for numerical work. Five versions were standardised and are commonly referred to as f66, f77, f90, f95 and f2003 to indicate the year. F95 has superseded f90, and no f2003 compilers exist yet. These notes concentrate on f77 and f95. They are written to show f77 users a number of the f95 features that I found so useful that I gave up f77 except when writing a program for someone with no f95 compiler. Some new features make programming easier, some allow the machine to detect bugs that f77 compilers cannot, and some make programs easier to read.

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  • Paradigms on Indigenous Language Revitalisation: the Case of Te Reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile

    Gallegos, Carina (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The existence of systems of indigenous knowledge depend greatly on the existence of indigenous languages. Processes of language revitalisation seek to uphold indigenous knowledge by restoring endangered indigenous languages. Historical processes of colonisation and globalisation in Chile and Aotearoa New Zealand have impacted and threatened each country's indigenous language. This dissertation describes language revitalisation processes of te reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile in order to further understand the implications of language on effectively revitalising indigenous culture and knowledge. The research and analysis presented implements comparative methodology through the use of case studies, direct observations, primary and secondary data sources. In an effort to evaluate and compare outcomes of indigenous language revitalisation schemes of te reo Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mapudungun in Chile, this thesis focuses on case studies in the context of how education programmes in each country approach indigenous language revitalisation.

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  • What Really is a Continuous Function?

    Harper, J F (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    There are surprisingly many essentially different definitions of continuity even of a real function of one real variable. This paper shows that the definitions in various textbooks published from 1893 to 1992 have some very different consequences, and that one error that was noticed and corrected in 1904 reappeared in a 1907 book.

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  • Research on financial reporting by defined benefit schemes

    Baskerville, Rachel F (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The objective of this working paper is to provide a comprehensive, readable and informative summary of superannuation reporting by defined benefit schemes in New Zealand; in order to: · monitor compliance with FRS 32 and identify areas where further requirements or amendments may be beneficial to users of such scheme reports; and · gain information with which an interested individual may be able to evaluate the necessity for a reporting standard addressing the reporting of superannuation schemes assets and liabilities by sponsoring entities; or in other ways to encourage adequate disclosure of superannuation schemes assets and liabilities by listed companies in New Zealand. Most of the work examining the schemes reports was undertaken in January 2000, and only one year of each scheme’s reports has been examined.

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  • Pat Metheny: Composing to Exploit the Sound of the Guitar

    Smith, Andy (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The study's objective is to relate the development of Pat Metheny's stylistic characteristics from his interpretation of jazz standards to their incorporation into his own compositions. Stylistic elements are established and a sample of his compositions are analysed to compare his solo style in standards with his compositional style. Metheny is a recognised innovator in technique and uses a wide range of instruments in the guitar family, both traditional and radically new. The use of such instruments frees Metheny from some restrictions and the possibility that this freedom is a major influence in his improvisation and composition is remarked on. There is scope for further work based on a wider sampling, and the methodology used in this study could probably be modified to focus on this objective.

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  • Literary-Historical Influences on the Novels of Sarah Waters

    Robinson, Rae (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In this thesis I examine the influences on the historical novels of Sarah Waters. Waters uses multiple sources from the Victorian literary tradition to construct her novels and displays an awareness of recent trends in scholarship in selecting those sources. Waters uses conventions that were popular with Victorian readers and updates them for a contemporary audience, by focusing, for example, on gay and lesbian characters and on sexuality.

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  • National Endogamy and Double Standards: Sexuality and Nationalism in East-Central Europe During the 19th Century

    Maxwell, Alexander (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    During the "long nineteenth century," nationalism came to permeate all aspects of European society, including attitudes toward human sexuality. Both sexuality and nationalism are complex phenomena that overlap in myriad ways. However, national endogamy may have been the most characteristically national of all possible sexual attributes: qualities such as chastity or fidelity, while frequently claimed as typical of a given national group, have religious and social dimensions independent of nationalism. An individual who makes nationality a decisive factor in selecting sexual partners, however, not only makes some concept of the nation a defining feature of sexual virtue, but implicitly defines the nation in sexual terms.

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  • Using Human Rights for Development: a Fiji Case Study

    Llewellyn-Fowler, Mary (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Over the past decade there has been a marked shift towards human rights in the policy of multilateral development institutions, international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and government donor agencies. 'Rights-based' development - in which development and poverty alleviation is viewed through a human rights lens - has become the language of choice among the international development community. As their proponents argue, rights-based approaches to development bring a degree of legal accountability to the alleviation of poverty, turning it from an act of charity to one of social justice. While this shift towards human rights is well documented at the global level, less is known about the understanding and use of human rights for development by NGOs at the local level. By focusing on a particular local context - Fiji - this research investigates how local NGOs understand and use human rights for development, and aims to identify the main challenges surrounding the use of human rights at this level. The findings from interviews with representatives of Fijian NGOs suggest that while human rights are being successfully applied to development in Fiji, they also face some challenges. Two of the most significant challenges are the politicised gap between human rights and development organisations and resistance to human rights on cultural grounds. These challenges demonstrate the impact local social, political and cultural contexts can have on the implementation of global ideas, and have numerous implications for the successful application of rights-based approaches to development at the local level.

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  • Plastic Shopping Bags: Environmental Impacts and Policy Options

    Tough, Rhian (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Due to public concern over the environmental impacts of plastic shopping bags many countries, states, towns and councils are implementing measures to address their use.While a number of individual retailers in New Zealand have taken steps to reduce plastic bag consumption, there has been limited national or regional government action to address plastic shopping bag use. While other countries have favoured economic instruments, such as Ireland's "PlasTax", under a cost benefit analysis research has identified that all policy interventions are cost inefficient.1 This thesis uses a mixed comparative approach to investigate the environmental impacts of plastic shopping bags and consumption patterns, in relation to international practice, alternatives to plastic shopping bag, and policy options. The mixed comparative approach used in this research is a combination of the philosophies underlying cost benefit analysis, sustainable development, triple bottom line reporting, case studies and policy analysis. Voluntary actions are identified as the least costly option, but achieve smaller reductions in plastic shopping bag use. In contrast regulatory actions are more likely to achieve greater reductions in plastic bag use, but are costly and have less public and political acceptance. Economic instruments while achieving modest to high reductions in plastic shopping bag use, are moderately costly, and also face acceptance and implementation constraints. However, due to strong public pressure for government intervention, and potential implications for future climate change and sustainability initiatives, it is suggested that economic instruments and regulatory options are the most likely choices for government policies to address plastic shopping bags.

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  • Care in Collaboration: Preventing Secondary Victimisation Through a Holistic Approach to Pre-Court Sexual Violence Interventions

    Beckett, Linda Louise (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Although men's sexual violence is well known as a problem of epidemic proportions and a cause of significant harm, effective prevention strategies have yet to be developed and the effectiveness of services for victims cannot be guaranteed. Most victims of sexual violence choose not to report, but those who do may still incur exacerbation of rape's destructive effects by those who are meant to help. Interested to know how responsiveness could be improved, I began this study by examining the literature on services for victims in order to identify the ingredients of good practice. Integrated specialist services which include support and advocacy with legal/forensic services emerged as the ideal. Finding that such systems had been positively evaluated in their real-life applications, New Zealand' s responsiveness was analysed with reference to this multi-agency model. I was particularly interested to know what supported the development of such a model and what the impediments might be to its development in New Zealand. Since literature indicated that government input was vital to implementation of specialist holistic practice, examination of New Zealand government and its Police responsiveness became the primary goal of data-gathering. With Police Districts as the units of study, data was collected from site visits and semi-structured interviews with police in each District. This data was triangulated through prolonged participant observation and interviews with medical/forensic and support/advocacy personnel. I found that specialist holistic services were regularly available for child sexual abuse victims. In contrast, for adult sexual violence victims these were rare and service gaps were rife. This was due to governance bodies failing to coordinate nationally or locally in funding and supporting service development. Explanations for this failure are found in feminist critiques of the patriarchal systems which privilege men' s needs over women's safety. I argue that with women's movement into public life and with the political will, nationally-based reform of services is now possible. Given its small size, New Zealand is particularly well-placed to achieve this reform if current governance structures are employed in constructing a national framework for nationwide development of specialist multi-agency practice.

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  • I'll Get by with a Little Help from my Friends: Young People's Help-Seeking for Depression

    Peacocke, Phillipa Mary (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The present research involved two studies examining the impact of severity on the process of help-seeking for depression. The first study included a survey of 316 New Zealand Adolescents (14-18 years) help-seeking, their inclination to seek help from a friend, parent, medical person and mental health professional for each scenario, and barriers to seeking help from these sources. Young females were more likely to identify depressive symptoms as a problem, and reported higher help-seeking, as well as lower barriers to seeking help. Age and ethnicity impacted on the process of seeking help, and inclination to seek help from different sources, supporting a complex multi-stage process, which both individual and contextual variables impact on the different stages. Correspondence Analysis was conducted on participant barriers to seeking help, which revealed that the severity of symptoms and source of help were reflected in participants' selection of barriers. It was suggested that young people perceive formal sources of help as more appropriate for severe symptoms of depression than informal sources such as friends and family. To examine this further, twenty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with similar aged young people in the second study. Through thematic analysis, two overarching themes were identified. The expected response from a helper, and their relationship with a helper, were found to influence seeking help from different sources. The severity of depressive symptoms was found to overlap with these themes, to influence the perceived appropriateness of different helpers. This research contributes to understanding the reasons young people prefer informal sources of help. That is, they are more trusted, the response is more predictable, and help is considered more relevant from informal sources, particularly friends. The importance of utilising and strengthening already established help-seeking pathways of friends and family is encouraged to improve help-seeking from professionals.

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  • Modification of the Disease Progression in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Using Anti-Mitotic Compounds

    Crume, Kevin Patrick (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-faceted disease, and is believed to be caused by an autoimmune response to myelin antigens in the central nervous system. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. manifests itself in various forms that parallel many aspects of MS, including the appearance of symptoms, initiation events, and pathophysiology. The hallmark of any immune response is the antigen-specific proliferation of immune cells, and during the initiation events of EAE, proliferating CD4+ T cells are the primary mediators of disease. This thesis explores if targeting these proliferating cells with the anti-mitotic compounds paclitaxel and peloruside A can delay or prevent the unset of EAE, thus providing a novel therapeutic avenue for MS research. The anti-cancer compound, paclitaxel, is an anti-mitotic drug that prevents microtubule depolymerisation. Although paclitaxel has been used in the clinical setting to treat cancer for over a decade, it has been determined that paclitaxel stimulates murine toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex, which is the major LPS receptor. A novel microtubule-stabilising compound, peloruside, is currently subject to intensive investigations due to its functional similarity to paclitaxel. The results from this project found that peloruside and paclitaxel inhibited the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated splenocytes with IC50 values of 83 nM and 30 nM, respectively, but did not affect the viability of non-proliferating cells In contrast to paclitaxel, peloruside did not cause the TLR4-mediated production of the inflammatory mediators. TNF-epsilon, IL-12, and nitric oxide, when cultured with IFN-epsilon stimulated murine macrophages. Interestingly, when LPS was included with either paclitaxel or peloruside A, both drugs decreased the production of TNF-e and nitric oxide from macrophages, suggesting that microtubule-stabilising compounds may have anti-inflammatory effects. To identify any immunomodifying effects of paclitaxel in vivo, paclitaxel was administered to mice that were immunised with the myelin protein MOG in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce EAE. When Taxol was administered to mice for 5 consecutive days immediately following CFA/MOG immunisation, the onset of EAE was delayed by approximately I week. Moreover, the administration of peloruside following the same treatment regime also resulted in a similar delay of disease onset. Taxol treatments, however, lead to significant mortality in immunised, but not unimmunised mice. Interestingly, although Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug, the proliferation of antigen-specific T cells was not inhibited in vivo by the Taxol treatment. The findings revealed in this thesis present an opportunity to pursue a new avenue of research for the therapeutic treatment of MS sufferers, and possibly other inflammatory autoimmune disorders.

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  • Langoron: Music and Dance Performance Realities Among the Lak People of Southern New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

    Wolffram, Paul (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis seeks to describe the indigenous realities, meanings, and perspectives that are central to the music and dance practices of the Lak (Siar) people in Southern New Ireland, Papua Now Guinea. The insights recorded here are those gained through the experience of twenty-three months living in Rei and Siar villages as a participant in many aspects of Lak social life. The music and dance practices of the region are examined in the context of the wider social and cultural setting. Lak performance realities, are indivisible from kinship structures, ritual proceedings and spirituality. By contextualising Lak music and dance within the frame of the extensive and socially defining mortuary, rites my intention is to show how music and dance not only reflect but also create Lak realities. By examining the ethnographic materials relating to music, dance and performance in the context of mortuary sequence broader elements of Lak society are brought into focus. In these pages I argue that Lak society is reproduced literally and symbolically in these performances.

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  • Assassins in academia? New Zealand academics as critic and conscience of society

    Bridgman, T. (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper uses literature on the positioning of intellectuals in society to consider the enactment of the ‘critic and conscience’ role within New Zealand universities. The critic and conscience of society is a statutory obligation for universities but is seen to be threatened by a combination of market forces and challenges to the status of knowledge. Drawing on the work of Laclau and Mouffe, the identity of the ‘critical and engaged expert’ is constituted, which recognises the vital role that New Zealand academics can play as a force for democratic social change.

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  • Kicking Round Home: Atonality in the Bone People

    Kennedy, Anne (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis considers the role that musical atonality plays in Keri Hulme's the bone people, and explores the ways in which an atonal reading can suggest interpretations for the novel 's cultural location. From a survey of the interdisciplinary study of music-inliterature as a method, three criteria for analysing music in the bone people are identified - narratology, symbology and sound-interpretation. The thesis traces the sometimes-intersecting histories of both Maori and Pakeha music. It considers how instances of atonality in the bone people relocate Maori singing, in function and to some extent in form, to the page. A survey of critical readings shows how the bone people has often been assigned intentions of biculturalism. This thesis challenges that notion and asserts that Hulme transforms cultural ingredients of both Maori and Pakeha in an atonal space, and re-imagines them in a Maori framework.

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  • Navigating Uncharted Waters: Teachers Collaborating Across Difference

    Hynds, Anne (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis provides a unique navigational story which describes my own careful exploration of a collaborative dynamic when culturally diverse teachers worked together on a unique professional development initiative. Between 2001 and 2003 the Ministry of Education in Aotearoa/New Zealand funded the first phase of an action research initiative, Te Kauhua/Maori in the Mainstream Pilot Project, in a number of schools across the country. This initiative aimed to improve teaching practice and outcomes for Maori students through the development of collaborative partnerships between MÃ ori and non-Maori within participating school communities. I worked to gather the stories of teachers' collaborative partnership work, from various perspectives over a period of two years, in two schools which had taken part in this first phase of this government funded project. The immediate result of such collective work was a commitment to work together for change and improvement in practice, and an apparent transformation in the thinking and practices of many teachers. My initial analysis highlighted partnership mechanisms and processes which held much promise and which had enabled the beginnings of change within and across both school communities. However as I continued my investigation over time I came to realise that sustaining change and development in schools, targeted at student groups who have been marginalised in the education system for a long time, was more complex than I first realised. Beneath the surface, in both schools, were submerged influences which militated against continuation and acceptance of such collaborative partnership work within and across both cultural communities. It became increasingly clear that a lack of shared vision across the schools generally, together with active resistance on the parts of particular groups, contributed to destroying the respect, trust and partnership that I thought had been established within the staff communities. This thesis therefore outlines the opportunities, challenges and threats to collaborative partnership work that aims to improve practice and outcomes for culturally diverse students.

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  • Magnetic and Transport Studies of Strongly Correlated Perovskite Ceramics

    Hemery, Erwan (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis describes the results from an experimental study of the magnetic and transport properties of two strongly correlated transition metal oxides. The firstmaterial under study is the ferromagnetic half-metal double perovskite, Sr2FeMoO6, in which we have made isoelectronic (Ba2+) and electronic (La3+) substitutions onto the strontium site. Magnetoresistance measurements on Sr2-xBaxFeMoO6 revealed that the low temperature magnetoresistance is dominated by inter-grain transport while the intra-grain contribution is evident when the temperature is close to the ferromagnetic transition temperature. Transport measurements on Sr2-xLaxFeMoO6 clearly showed that the doping dependence of the thermoelectric power is surprisingly similar to the one observed in the superconducting cuprates. In addition, it was found that the electronic doping leads to an increase in the ferromagnetic transition temperature, which supports the band filling model. Substitution on the Fe site was also investigated by partially replacing Fe with the non-magnetic aluminium element (Sr2Fe1-xAlxMoO6). It was found from thermoelectric power measurement that the Fe electronic state is below3+,which is inconsistentwith theoretical models but is in good agreement with Mossbauer measurements. In addition, magnetic measurements showed that the reduction in the ferromagnetic ordering temperature could be explained in terms of a 3D percolation model. The second compound is the oxygen deficient strontium iron oxide SrFeO3-delta . The temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power was measured in this compound for the first time and shown to be reminiscent of the charge-ordering Verwey transition observed in Fe3O4. Magnetic measurements show an increase of a weak ferromagnetic signal versus the oxygen deficiency that could originate from a Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in the distorted FeO6 octahedra. Finally, we observed a large magnetoresistance near room temperature for compounds close to the orthorhombic SrFeO2.75 phase.

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  • Factors Underlying +/- 3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Self Administration

    Daniela, Evangelene Joy Kia (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Rationale: +/- 3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) consumption has increased globally over the past two decades. Human studies have demonstrated that in a small proportion of users MDMA consumption may become problematic. Limited preclinical studies have evaluated the abuse potential of MDMA. Objectives: The present study sought to determine if MDMA selfadministration has similar addictive properties as other abused substances. Initial experiments sought to determine if MDMA could function as a reinforcer. Subsequent experiments assessed whether dopamine played a role in MDMA self-administration, whether MDMA self-administration was maintained by the presentation of a conditioned stimulus, and if extinguished MDMA self-administration could be reinstated. Methods: Animals were surgically implanted with indwelling intravenous catheters that allowed delivery of MDMA solution upon depression of an active lever. MDMA self-administration was examined in drug naïve and cocaine-trained animals. Further assessment of the reliability of self-administration was assessed using a yoked procedure, dose effect curves were obtained, vehicle substitution occurred, and progressive ratio procedures were used. The underlying role of dopamine in mediating MDMA self-administration was determined using the D1- like antagonist, SCH23390, and D2-like antagonist, eticlopride. Manipulation of the light and/or drug stimulus was used to provide initial assessment of the conditioning properties of MDMA. The ability of 10 mg/kg MDMA to reinstate responding previously maintained by MDMA was also determined. Results: MDMA was reliably self-administered in drug naïve and cocaine trained animals. Responding was selective to contingent MDMA administration, reduced with vehicle substitution, sensitive to dose manipulation, and increasing demand. A rightward shift in the dose effect curve was demonstrated after administration of SCH23390. Removal of both the light and drug stimuli produced a rapid reduction in responding. Removal of either the light or drug stimulus produced a gradual reduction over 15 days. Administration of MDMA reinstated responding previously maintained by MDMA. Conclusion: The demonstration of reliable MDMA self-administration provided a baseline for assessing MDMA abuse potential. MDMA selfadministration was mediated by dopaminergic mechanisms which may be similar to those demonstrated for other abused substances. MDMA selfadministration also produced conditioning - a feature of compulsive drug use. Responding previously maintained by MDMA was later reinstated by MDMA, demonstrating that MDMA use may result in relapse. MDMA has similar behavioural properties as other commonly abused substances.

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  • Quantitative Ecological Impact Assessments using Natural Abundance Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Signatures

    Dudley, Bruce David (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The use of delta15N and delta13C signatures to infer sources of enrichment in ecological systems relies on predictability in the transfer of delta15N and delta13C ratios. This thesis examines patterns of delta15N and delta13C change as pools of nitrogen and carbon move from a sewage effluent discharge into organisms in an adjacent coastal rocky reef community (Titahi Bay, New Zealand). These changes and their mechanisms are examined in the broader context of current research using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in marine ecology, with particular reference to impact assessment. Firstly this thesis examines the assimilation of nitrogen and carbon isotopes in Ulva sp. under varying light conditions and nitrogen source (e.g., nitrate or ammonium). In a field study, algae grown at depth and under lower light conditions showed comparatively lighter nitrogen isotope signatures relative to the predicted concentration of available 15N-enriched sewage nitrogen. In a complementary laboratory experiment, results from manipulated light availability and N source (either nitrate or ammonium, in equivalent molar concentrations) suggest that: 1) low-light conditions can produce algae with lighter nitrogen isotope signatures; and 2) this effect was more pronounced for ammonium (3.7 per mil difference between high light and low light treatments) than for nitrate (0.6 per mil difference between high light and low light treatments) sources. Stable carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) of Ulva sp.grown in conditions of low nitrogen availability were shown to be generally lower than those grown in nitrogen rich conditions in both field and laboratory studies. Where nitrogen supply was sufficient for growth, low light conditions also produced generally lower delta13C signatures than high light conditions. Experimental trials with a uniform dissolved inorganic carbon source and altered light and nitrogen enrichment levels produced delta 13C levels in Ulva sp. tissue that spanned the recorded delta13C ranges of many common algal species; -5.99 per mil (high light, with added ammonium and phosphate) to -17.61 per mil (high light without nutrient additions). Chapter 3 of this study examines the growth response of Ulva sp. to surplus nitrate and ammonium (the two most common forms of nitrogen available to plants in seawater), under light limited conditions. Ulva sp. experienced a temporary reduction in growth rate and nitrogen assimilation capacity (shown in tissue nitrogen indices) when grown on nitrate, relative to ammonium. The magnitude and the temporary nature of these results suggest that in natural populations the relative proportion of nitrate or ammonium available is unlikely to significantly affect the growth capacity of Ulva sp. In chapter 4, I use delta13C and delta15N signatures to separately trace the dissolved and particulate fractions of sewage effluent dispersal onto a rocky reef community. Delta15N signatures from tissue of the macroalga Carpophyllum maschalocarpum, and the herbivorous isopod Amphoroidea media tracked the distribution and signature of DIN from a sewage treatment plant that generated heavy delta15N signatures. Delta13C signatures from tissue of the filter-feeding half-crab Petrolisthes elongatus tracked the distribution and signature of suspended sewage particulate organic matter.

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  • Cretaceous and Cenozoic Basin Evolution Based on Decompacted Sediment Thickness from Petroleum Wells around New Zealand

    Christie, Louise Jane (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Decompacted sedimentary data from 33 New Zealand exploration wells is used to investigate basin evolution and tectonics from around New Zealand. This analysis is directed to both a comparison of basin behaviour and a search for common subsidence signatures. Common to almost all New Zealand basin subsidence curves is a sedimentary signature associated with rifting of the Gondwana super-continent (80-65 Ma). In the Great South Basin a second rifting event is inferred at 51 [plus or minus] 2 Ma, illustrated by a rapid increase in subsidence rates (with a maximum rate of 190 m.Myr-1 at Pakaha-1). Coinciding with the cessation of Tasman Sea rifting ([approximately] 53 Ma), and with the onset of rifting in the Emerald Basin ([approximately] 50 Ma), it is assumed that the event is related to the tectonic plate reorganization. An increase in sedimentation is noted at [approximately] 20 Ma in most South Island wells. Convergence on the Alpine Fault, leading to increased erosion is cited as a mechanism for this period of basin growth, consistent with the Cande and Stock (2004) model of plate motions. A second increase in sedimentation occurs at [approximately] 6 Ma in almost all wells around New Zealand. Climate-driven erosion resulting in isostatic uplift is thought to contribute to this event. Hiatuses in the sedimentary record for the Canterbury, Great South and Western Southland Basins during the late Oligocene are interpreted as the Marshall Paraconformity. It appears that the break in sedimentation located within a regional transgressional mega-sequence was caused by mid Oligocene glacio-eustatic fall and related oceanic current processes. Loading by the Northland Allochthon, in conjunction with paleobathymetry and subsidence data, is used to demonstrate the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. A lithospheric rigidity of 1.5 x [10 to the power of 22] Nm is estimated, with an elastic thickness of 12 km. Considerably lower than elastic thickness values previously calculated for the Plio-Pleistocene loading of the Taranaki Platform. It is noted that the Northland value represents a younger, hotter crust at the time of load emplacment. With the exception of the central Taranaki and Great South Basins, stretching factors ([Beta]) for the sedimentary basins surrounding New Zealand are below 2. This suggests crustal thickness prior to rifting was between 35 and 50 km, consistent with data from conjugate margins of Australia and Antarctica. An increase in water depth in the Taranaki Basin at 25 [plus or minus] 3 Ma is confirmed by this study. This coincides with a similar signature on the West Coast of the South Island at 26 [plus or minus] 2 Ma. It is suggested that a mantle flow caused by the initiation of the subduction zone at [approximately] 25 Ma extends over a broader region (>750 km) than previously thought.

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