331 results for Scholarly text, 2009

  • A window to a magical world of adventure, secrets and spectacle: Peter Pan [Review]

    Crawford, Terri Ripeka (2009)

    Scholarly text
    University of Waikato

    Choreography: Russell Kerr Music: Philip Norman Design: Kristian Fredrikson Lighting: Jon Buswell ROYAL NEW ZEALAND BALLET at Founders Theatre, Hamilton From 9 Dec 2009 to 10 Dec 2009 Reviewed by Terri Ripeka Crawford, 11 Dec 2009

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  • Taking quality work to a new brilliance: Tama Ma on tour [Review]

    Crawford, Terri Ripeka (2009)

    Scholarly text
    University of Waikato

    Choreographers: Taiaroa Royal and Taane Mete; Douglas Wright; Michael Parmenter Okareka Dance Company at Telecom Playhouse Theatre, WEL Energy Trust Academy of Performing Arts, Hamilton From 17 Jun 2009 to 20 Jun 2009 Reviewed by Terri Ripeka Crawford, 22 Jun 2009.

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  • Creating New Standards: Jazz Arrangements Of Pop Songs

    Lile, Trudy (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study involves the research, analysis, and performance of existing arrangements of songs that have been played and recorded by jazz musicians, and are identifiable as pop songs of the last thirty years. This project will discuss the development of these songs as new repertoire in the jazz idiom. In particular it will examine transcriptions of arrangements by Herbie Hancock, Dianne Reeves, Brad Meldau, Charlie Hunter, Christian McBride, and Bob Belden. The analysis of these transcriptions will consider the techniques these musicians used in their arrangements including reharmonisation, melodic interpretation, rhythm, and restructuring of the form of the original song. Further, the techniques identified in the analyses will be applied in the creation of new arrangements of similar songs from that era for jazz ensemble of various sizes.

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  • Bacterial Communities Associated with Human Decomposition

    Parkinson, Rachel (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Human decomposition is a little-understood process with even less currently known about the microbiology involved. The aim of this research was to investigate the bacterial community associated with exposed decomposing mammalian carcasses on soil and to determine whether changes in this community could potentially be used to determine time since death in forensic investigations. A variety of soil chemistry and molecular biology methods, including molecular profiling tools T-RFLP and DGGE were used to explore how and when bacterial communities change during the course of a decomposition event. General bacterial populations and more specific bacterial groups were examined. Decomposition was shown to cause significant and sequential changes in the bacterial communities within the soil, and changes in the bacterial community often correlated with visual changes in the stage of decomposition. Organisms derived from the cadavers and carcasses were able to be detected, using molecular methods, in the underlying soil throughout the decomposition period studied. There was little correlation found between decomposition stage and the presence and diversity within the specific bacterial groups investigated. Organisms contributing to the changes seen in the bacterial communities using molecular profiling methods were identified using a cloning and sequencing based technique and included soil and environment-derived bacteria, as well as carcass or cadaver-derived organisms. This research demonstrated that pig (Sus scrofa) carcass and human cadaver decomposition result in similar bacterial community changes in soil, confirming that pig carcasses are a good model for studying the microbiology of human decomposition. The inability to control for differences between donated human cadavers made understanding the human cadaver results difficult, whereas pig carcass study allowed many variables to be held constant while others were investigated. The information gained from this study about the bacteria associated with a cadaver and how the community alters over the course of decomposition may, in the future, enable the development of a forensic post mortem interval estimation tool based on these changes in the bacterial community over time. The findings in this thesis suggest that high variability between human bodies and their microflora is likely to present a challenge to the development of such a tool, but further study with emerging high-throughput molecular tools may enable identification of microbial biomarkers for this purpose.

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  • Ecological, Oceanographic and Temperature Controls on the Incorporation of Trace Elements into Globigerina Bulloides and Globoconella Inflata in the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    Marr, Julene (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Trace element ratios (Mg/Ca, Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry plus and test weight and size data are presented for two planktonic foraminiferal species, Globigerina bulloides and Globoconella inflata. These data will be used to investigate the potential of Mg/Ca ocean thermometry and other trace element proxies of past ocean chemistry using these species. Foraminifera were sampled from core-top sediments from 10 sites in the Southwest Pacific Ocean, east of New Zealand, spanning latitudes of c.33' to 54' S and temperatures of 6-19' C at 75-300 m water depth. Mg/Ca in G. bulloides correlates strongly with observed water temperatures at 200 m depth and yields a new calibration of Mg/Ca = 0.941 exp 0.0693*T (r2 = 0.95). When G. bulloides Mg/Ca data from this study are combined with previously published data for this species, a calibration of Mg/Ca = 0.998 exp 0.066*T (r2 = 0.97) is defined. Significant variability of Mg/Ca values (20-30%) was found for the four largest chambers of G. bulloides with the final chamber consistently recording the lowest Mg/Ca values. This is interpreted to reflect changes in the depth habitat towards the end of the life cycle of G. bulloides. Levels of A1 and the micronutrients Mn and Zn in G. bulloides were found to differ significantly between Subtropical and Subantarctic Water masses, suggesting these elements can potentially be used as water mass tracers. No clear relationship between Mg/Ca and temperature was observed for G.inflata. This is interpreted, in part, to reflect the ecological niche that G. inflata occupies at the base of the thermocline, coupled with the impact of heavy secondary calcite which lowers Mg/Ca values. A correlation between size normalized test weight, water temperature and seawater carbonate ion concentration is observed for G. bulloides suggesting a modern calibration that could be potentially applied for paleoceanographic reconstructions of ocean water temperature and carbonate ion concentrations. No correlation between temperature or carbonate ion was found with size normalized G. inflata test weights. However, a bimodal population of G. inflata test weights indicates a possible link between high levels of chlorophyll-a in surface waters and light G. inflata tests. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and solution-based techniques for measuring Mg/Ca in G. bulloides yield compatible results. However, this is possible only when minimal dissolution of test calcite has occurred during the reductive and dilute acid leaching stages of cleaning prior to solution analysis, or, if only the older three visible chambers are used for LA-ICP-MS analysis. LA-ICP-MS analysis is an effective method for measuring trace element/Ca values in foraminifera, especially for small sample sizes, and enables the test to be used for further geochemical analysis (e.g. boron or carbon/oxygen stable isotope analysis).

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  • I Love Ali: a Telefeature

    Arapai, Arnette Makimou (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    One man's quest to meet his idol 'Muhammad Ali', the Greatest boxer of all time...

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  • Polynomial Invariants of the Euclidean Group Action on Multiple Screws

    Crook, Deborah (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In this work, we examine the polynomial invariants of the special Euclidean group in three dimensions, SE(3), in its action on multiple screw systems. We look at the problem of finding generating sets for these invariant subalgebras, and also briefly describe the invariants for the standard actions on R^n of both SE(3) and SO(3). The problem of the screw system action is then approached using SAGBI basis techniques, which are used to find invariants for the translational subaction of SE(3), including a full basis in the one and two-screw cases. These are then compared to the known invariants of the rotational subaction. In the one and two-screw cases, we successfully derive a full basis for the SE(3) invariants, while in the three-screw case, we suggest some possible lines of approach.

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  • Local Visual Processing in High Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Scorers.

    McLean, Lisa Mae (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Reaction times for big and small letters (global and local levels) were compared and examined to see whether differences would occur between a low scoring and high scoring Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder (OCD) group. OCD patients have been shown to notice and pay more attention to small details (local bias) compared to most other populations (Shapiro, 1965; Yovel et al. 2006; Caberea et al., 2001). Although there is research supporting a local bias in OCD patients, it is unclear whether the bias occurs in the early stages of visual processing or in a later memory stage (Moritz & Wendt, 2006; Hermans et al, 2008). The study specifically examined a potential local bias for high OCD scorers in the early visual stage by manipulating perceptual and attentional mechanisms in two hierarchical letter tasks (Navon, 1977; Miller, 1981a, Plaisted et al. 1999). In Experiment 1, participants were told which level (the big or small letter) to respond to, results showed that high OCD scorers responded faster to local letters, showing support for a local processing advantage. Conversely, the low OCD group responded quicker to the global level. The finding of a local advantage in Experiment 1 suggests that the local advantage may be due to perceptual mechanisms as attention was already directed to the relevant level. However, in Experiment 2 where attention was not directed and the image quality was manipulated, local and global advantage effects were not replicated for the high and low OCD groups respectively. This showed that attentional and perceptual mechanisms did not make one level easier to process over the other. Therefore, it is possible that any local bias for OCD patients occurs in a later processing stage.

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  • The Effect of Music Therapy on Self-Reported Affect in Hospitalised Paediatric Patients

    Armstrong, Ruth Elizabeth (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The present research examines the effect of music therapy on the affect of hospitalised children. It took place on a paediatric ward of a New Zealand public hospital. This study aimed to investigate the role of music therapy in addressing patients' psychosocial needs. Literature on the impact of hospitalisation, and on the use of music therapy in hospitals and paediatrics was reviewed. The research involved an audit of the therapist's clinical notes from music therapy sessions over the course of seven months. The clinical notes included measurements of children's mood from the beginning and end of sessions, using McGrath's (1990) Affective Facial Scale. It was hypothesised that mood measures following music therapy would be higher than pre-music therapy scores. Statistical analysis of the facial scale data did not show a significant difference between 'before' and 'after' measures. These results were discussed with regard to a ceiling effect (this is, the measurements indicated patients were at the happy end of the scale before the music therapy session, so there was little room on the scale for mood to improve following music therapy). The measurement of emotion did not prove to be straightforward. The hospital environment may have influenced the patients' responses in a number of ways. These environmental influences are discussed with reference to examples from the clinical notes. The usefulness of facial scales in this context is discussed, as well as other limitations of the research. Suggestions for future research include the use of other mood measures, and the inclusion of measurements of parental mood and how this affects the child.

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  • Promoting Sociability: Staff Perceptions of Music Therapy as a Way to Enhance Social Skills.

    Boniface, Emma Jane (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis is the result of working with nine students and one teacher aide in group music therapy in special education. Through opportunities to learn about music and sound, the students were invited to use descriptive language to express emotions and thoughts about their music therapy experience. This research used a qualitative research design, where the purpose was to learn about the perceptions that staff may have of music therapy and to highlight how music therapy can promote sociability in an educative setting. The data collected mainly through research journal entries and two interviews (as well as material from a discussion group) offer evidence about how improvisational group music therapy can help create a positive social environment in the classroom and complement socialisation goals in education.

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  • LibraryThing Tags and Library of Congress Subject Headings: a Comparison of Science Fiction and Fantasy Works

    Carman, Nicholas (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study examines the extent to which LibraryThing tags match their equivalent Library of Congress subject headings and looks at whether they offer any additional information about the subject matter of the books to which they are applied. This study has a largely quantitative methodology with some qualitative aspects. The researcher harvested tags from ten books in the genres of science fiction and fantasy. The tags were then classified into categories created by the researcher and examined using descriptive statistics inside Excel. The most frequently used tags were those that matched the Library of Congress subject headings, but there were a significant number of non-matching tags that offered useful additional information about the books in the sample. Library of Congress subject headings mostly identify the basic genres that the books in the sample belonged to, but added little additional information. Integrating tagging into library OPACs would create more opportunities for library users to find books in which they are interested.

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  • A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study

    Humphrey, Megan (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The present study used a Signal Detection approach to the study of prosody perception in children and adults who self-reported high levels of anxiety. Seventy-one children aged eight and nine years, and 85 adults listened to filtered speech and were required to discriminate angry, fearful and happy tones of voice. Anxiety levels were not associated with perception of affective prosody in adults. Levels of anxiety were related to children's criterion but not sensitivity to prosody. Highly anxious children were significantly more liberal in reporting fearful prosody compared to low anxious children. Analyses of total responses suggest that this criterion is reflective of an interpretation bias as opposed to a response bias. Given that the interpretation bias was observed in children and not adults, it is possible that the bias may mark a vulnerability to develop further anxiety. This is consistent with previous experimental findings in other modalities as well as integrative models of anxiety development that identify such cognitive biases as predisposing factors. Furthermore, regardless of anxiety level, children were comparable to adults in their accuracy for fearful prosody, yet were significantly poorer than adults in their accuracy for angry and happy prosody. This suggests that fear may be one of the first emotions children learn to identify.

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  • The Effects of New Entries on Economic Growth: a Story on Advanced and Laggard Sectors

    Hansen, Vera (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The main goal of this thesis is to construct a theoretical model that provides an explanation for the relationship between growth and new entry that is consistent with empirical evidence. The model is a four sector endogenous growth model in which there is a technologically advanced and a technologically laggard consumption goods which are imperfect substitutes. The production of each good requires its own stock of human capital and physical capital. The accumulation of physical capital and human capital in each industry is modelled by a Cobb-Douglas production function. The main result of the model is that new entries have a positive effect on the fraction of the existing stock of human capital devoted to the accumulation of human capital in both the advanced and laggard sectors. However, this effect is stronger in the advanced sectors than in the laggard sectors. This result is consistent with empirical evidence.

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  • Nails in New Zealand 1770 to 1910

    Isaacs, Nigel (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper reviews the earliest records of metal nails in New Zealand, and then provides a comprehensive New Zealand review from the 1840s to 1910s of nail imports, published newspapers, trade catalogues and patents. It concludes that while there may have been a small scale hand-made nail industry, it was not until the late l880s that the first wire nails were manufactured in New Zealand and not until after 1910 that the industry became established to any extent.

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  • Vicarious Traumatization: The Impact of Nursing upon Nurses

    Davies, Lesley (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The aims of this research were to explore mental health nurses' knowledge and experience of vicarious traumatization (VT). Literature linking mental health nursing and VT is sparse. VT is an enduring trauma that affects those who engage empathically across time and with different patients. Mental health nurses form ongoing therapeutic relationships with patients to foster healing. This empathic engagement leaves nurses vulnerable to VT. This project is qualitatively designed using narrative enquiry with in-depth, semistructured interviews of mental health nurses. Data gathered was thematically analysed and four main themes identified: the impact of VT; self-knowledge/self-awareness; self-care; and burnout. Participants in this study felt unprepared for the negative impact of mental health nursing and learned of VT 'on the job'. My recommendations include education on identifying VT, and self-care, including clinical supervision, to ameliorate the effects of VT. Further research is needed to explore the links between VT and mental health nursing.

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  • Domestic Wallpaper in New Zealand: a Literature Survey

    McCarthy, Christine (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper summarises the existing literature on New Zealand wallpaper. It draws on material from contemporary sources, architectural histories, archaeolgical research on specific buildings, and guides to building restoration. The paper focuses exclusively on research on New Zealand use of wallpaper, and divides this material into four sections: early nineteenth century to the c1860s, the 1870s to the early twentieth century, early twentieth century to the 1960s, and a final section on the design, manufacture and importing of wallpaper in New Zealand.

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  • A Grammar of Nahavaq (Malakula, Vanuatu)

    Dimock, Laura Gail (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis is a descriptive grammar of Nahavaq, an Oceanic language spoken by about 700 people in the Sinesip cultural area of Malakula, Vanuatu. Nahavaq was previously undescribed, and this grammar is based on data collected by the researcher over a total of nine months in the Sinesip area. The thesis includes a sociolinguistic overview of the Nahavaq-speaking community and descriptions of phonetics, phonology, mophology, syntax, semantics, and discourse. Noteworthy features of Nahavaq include: (i) two classes of bilabial consonants, which are distinguished by palatalisation and velarisation; (ii) two reduplicative verbal prefixes, which partially overlap in function; (iii) a base-20 numeral system with subbases of five and ten; (iv) nouns which include an accreted article; (v) serial verb constructions; and (vi) nine different surface forms for expressing possession relationships. The attached DVD contains a Nahavaq-English glossary, along with recordings and transcriptions of Nahavaq texts for reference purposes.

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  • Parent-Child Reminiscing: Relationships between Parent Elaborations, Emotion Talk and Memory Contributions of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Faust, Wendy (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    How parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) engage their children in reminiscing about the past was investigated in a sample of 12 children with ASD and 12 matched typically developing children. Analysis of parent elaboration styles and emotion talk during reminiscing revealed no significant differences between parents of children with ASD and parents of typically developing children. The elaboration style and emotion talk of parents of children with ASD was associated with their children's memory contributions and emotion talk during conversations. The discussion addresses why the social and language difficulties, characteristic of ASD, may not have impacted on parent-child reminiscing. It considers this specifically in relation to the role that parents of children with ASD play in 'scaffolding' their children through the critical developmental process of parent-child reminiscing.

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  • Institutional Repositories and the Role of Academic Libraries in Scholarly Communication

    Chawner, Brenda; Cullen, Rowena (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores the development of institutional repositories as a global phenomenon, comparing their objectives with the core principles of scholarly communication that have preserved and disseminated western knowledge for the past two centuries.

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  • Embodying Disney Dreams: the Representation of Femininity and Whiteness in Recent Disney Animated Films

    Maplesden, Allison (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis proposes to critically examine the ways in which whiteness and femininity are represented in recent Disney animated films. It will be contended that the Disney text is an influential part of the popular cultural discourse on femininity and whiteness but this is often obscured or made invisible by the ways in which the films work to naturalise these constructions. The work of this thesis will be to unpack the constructions of femininity and whiteness through an analysis of the figuration of the Disney heroine. This thesis will argue that idealized whiteness and femininity are discursively embodied in these Disney heroines in complex and contradictory ways, and that Disney works on and through these bodies to fix and contain the ideological constructions of gender, race, and sexuality.

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