450 results for Scholarly text, 2010

  • The Improvisation of Tubby Hayes in 'The New York Sessions'

    Alton-Lee, Amity Rose (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Tubby (Edward Brian) Hayes; prodigious self taught multi-instrumentalist and virtuoso tenor saxophone player has been proclaimed by some to be the best saxophonist that Britain has ever produced: "Indisputably the most accomplished and characterful British jazzman of his generation." His career, although cut short (he died undergoing treatment for a heart condition in June 1973, aged 38) was perpetually intense, incredibly prolific, and non-stop from his debut at the age of fifteen until his premature death. Hayes was proficient on many instruments; all saxophones, clarinet, flute, violin and vibraphone as well as being an accomplished bandleader and arranger. However it was his virtuoso tenor saxophone playing that found him acclaim. Although well known in his time and widely renowned for his ability, Hayes until recently has been little studied. It is only in the last few years that many critics and students of jazz have attempted to gain an understanding of Hayes' improvisational concept, which has been both praised as genius and criticised as directionless: Tubby Hayes has often been lionized as the greatest saxophonist Britain ever produced. He is a fascinating but problematical player. Having put together a big, rumbustious tone and a delivery that features sixteenth notes spilling impetuously out of the horn, Hayes often left a solo full of brilliant loose ends and ingenious runs that led nowhere in particular... However, Hayes, his legacy, and his inimitable style of tenor saxophone playing would truly leave their mark on the British Jazz community for generations to come. Dave Gelly summed up Hayes by saying that Tubby "played Cockney tenor - garrulous, pugnacious, never at a loss for a word and completely unstoppable."

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  • Towards a New Pacific Theatre: Practice‐Led Enquiry into a Model of Theatre Making that Relates to the Geography, Cultures and Spiritual Values of Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Van Dijk, Bert (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This practice‐led research enquiry sets out to develop and test a model of theatre practice that relates to the unique geographic, cultural and spiritual dimensions of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In this practice, actors are connected with their body and the earth (they have feet), archetypal qualities inherent in nature and culture are incorporated into training and performance (return of the gods), a sense of adventure and risk‐taking is emphasized, and the practice relates to the multiple cultures and communities of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Presence, defined as the ability to be sensorially alive in the moment, and site‐specific performance, a creative response to locality, emerged as two of the key strategies to connect with self, other and the environment. By investigating selected principles, strategies and values from the indigenous, pre‐European, Māori performing arts (whare tapere), devised theatre, the Michael Chekhov technique, and Japanese Noh theatre, an intercultural approach to site specific theatre evolved that interweaves the four pathways of collaboration, connection, exploration and transformation and their corresponding values. After considering the political and ethical issues of intercultural performance a number of principles to guide the process of intercultural exchange were formulated and tested. A vital component of this study was the creative development and performance of Ex_isle of Strangers – a site‐specific work developed in response to the tangible and intangible dimensions of Matiu/Somes Island. The research generated moments of practice that investigated the creative potential of residential devising processes and the transformative value of audience mobility in performances that involve physical and metaphorical journeying. These moments provided the participants (performers and spectators) time, space and opportunity to interact with one another and with the site they occupied, thus significantly increasing their level of physical and mental engagement with the work.

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  • New Zealand Works for Contrabassoon

    Roud, Hayley Elizabeth (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The contrabassoon is seldom thought of as a solo instrument. Throughout the long history of contraregister double-reed instruments the assumed role has been to provide a foundation for the wind chord, along the same line as the double bass does for the strings. Due to the scale of these instruments - close to six metres in acoustic length, to reach the subcontra B flat’’, an octave below the bassoon’s lowest note, B flat’ - they have always been difficult and expensive to build, difficult to play, and often unsatisfactory in evenness of scale and dynamic range, and thus instruments and performers are relatively rare. Given this bleak outlook it is unusual to find a number of works written for solo contrabassoon by New Zealand composers. This exegesis considers the development of contra-register double-reed instruments both internationally and within New Zealand, and studies five works by New Zealand composers for solo contrabassoon, illuminating what it was that led them to compose for an instrument that has been described as the 'step-child' or 'Cinderella' of both the wind chord and instrument makers.

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  • Sequence Stratigraphy, Chronostratigraphy and Zircon Geochronology of the CIROS-1 Drill Core, Ross Sea, Antarctica: Implications for Cenozoic Glacial and Tectonic Evolution

    Van de Ven, Evelien (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Antarctica plays a central role in the global climate system. Understanding the continent's past climate interactions is key to predicting its future response to, and influence on, global climate change. In recent decades, sediment cores drilled on the Antarctic continental margin have provided direct evidence of past climatic and tectonic events. Drilled in 1986 from sea ice in western McMurdo Sound, the pioneering 702 m-long CIROS-1 core extended back to the Late Eocene and provided some of the first evidence of the antiquity and history of the Antarctic ice sheets. The CIROS-1 drill core recovered a depositional history of the western margin of the Victoria Land Basin adjacent to the Trans-Antarctic Mountains. It was located directly offshore from where the Ferrar Glacier, which drains the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, discharges into the Ross Sea. Consequently CIROS-1 contains a record of both the glacial and tectonic Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic margin. This thesis provides a timely re-evaluation of the CIROS-1 core with new analysis techniques that enable further insights into the glacial and tectonic history of the western Ross Sea region, and includes three key objectives: (1) Re-examine CIROS-1 sedimentology and stratigraphy and provide a new facies and sequence stratigraphic analysis using modern methods developed from recent drilling projects (e.g. CRP, ANDRILL). (2) Develop a new integrated chronostratigraphic model through an assessment and compilation of previous studies, which provides a context for the interpretation of detrital zircon data, climate and tectonic history. (3) Undertake a detailed examination of the provenance of CIROS-1 sediments using cutting edge in situ analysis techniques of detrital zircons (U-Pb and trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS). Glaciomarine sequence stratigraphic analysis identifies 14 unconformity-bound sequences occurring in two distinctive stratigraphic motifs. The four sequences located beneath the 342 mbsf unconformity contain relatively complete vertical facies succession. They were deposited in shallow marine, fluvio-deltaic conditions with distal glaciers terminating on land, and possibly calving into the ocean in adjacent valleys as evidenced by occasional ice-rafted debris. The ten sequences located above ~342 mbsf have a fundamentally different architecture. They are incomplete (top-truncated), contain subglacial and ice proximal facies grading upsequence into distal glaciomarine and shelf conditions. Top truncation of these sequences represents overriding of the CIROS-1 site by the paleo-Ferrar Glacier during glacial phases. A revised age model for CIROS-1 is presented that utilises new calibrations for Antarctic diatom zones and compiles three previously published age models for different sections of the core (Roberts et al., 2003; Wilson et al., 1998; Hannah et al., 1997). The new age model allows correlation of Late Oligocene cycles with coeval cycles in CRP-2/2A, 80 km to the north. A fundamental orbital control on the dynamics of these East Antarctic Ice Sheet outlet glaciers is evident from this comparison. Both glacier systems respond in-phase to longer-period orbital components (e.g. eccentricity 100 kyr and 400 kyr), but differ in their sensitivity to precession (20 kyr). It appears that during the Late Oligocene the Ferrar catchment responded to 20 kyr precession cycles, whilst the larger MacKay Glacier, which is more directly connected to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, responded to longer duration 125 kyr (eccentricity) forcing. CIROS-1 zircons group into four distinct geochemical suites. Zircons formed in felsic igneous environments dominate the CIROS-1 population, with 89 % of zircons analysed showing geochemical characteristics inherent to granitic/rhyolitic zircons. Approximately 7 % of CIROS-1 zircons have a highly trace element enriched igneous provenance and were most probably sourced from enriched enclaves in granitic/rhyolitic units or from pegmatites. Approximately 3 % of CIROS-1 zircons show a metamorphic geochemical signature, and ~1 % formed in trace element depleted igneous environments. The zircons were sourced from the local basement (Koettlitz, Granite Harbour Groups), the Beacon Supergroup, and potentially, lithologies of the East Antarctic Craton located under the ice, or components of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains located under the current baseline of geologic exposure. Large-scale, systematic temporal trends in zircon characteristics have been divided into three distinct climatic periods: Zone 1 (702-366 mbsf, Late Eocene), Zone 2 (366-250 mbsf, Late Oligocene) and Zone 3 (< 250 mbsf, Late Oligocene and Early Miocene). Zircons deposited during these periods show unique properties. During Zone 1, Antarctica experienced a relatively warm temperate climate and alpine style glaciers flowed eastwards through the Trans-Antarctic Mountains. Zircons in this zone contain a subtle record of unroofing of geochemically zoned Granite Harbour and Koettlitz units located in the Ferrar Valley. During Zone 2 deposition, glaciers flowed though the Trans-Antarctic Mountains draining a large and ephemeral EAIS, which oscillated on orbital time scales. Zircons in this interval show variable properties, high numbers and were most probably deposited as the paleo-Ferrar Glacier deeply incised the Ferrar Fiord. In contrast, Zone 3 is characterised by a flux of McMurdo Volcanic Complex derived sediments, together with systematic changes in zircon characteristics. These patterns indicate a Late Oligocene shift in ice flow to the site (above ~250 mbsf). Due to a cooling that culminated in the Mi-1 glaciation, ice flow to the site changed from an eastward to a northward flow, in response to an increased ice volume in the Ross embayment.

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  • Machine Actuated Craft

    Murdoch, Jonathan William (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Throughout history the use of scale representations has been important in the process of creating architecture. In recent times the introduction of computer-aided design (CAD) has significantly altered traditional methods of conceptual design representation, mainly through a shift from the physical to the virtual. The aim of the research is to explore the relationship between computer aided manufacturing (CAM) and the methods for extracting and producing qualities of a conceptual nature from computer and numerically controlled (CNC) machine, and how this could advance conceptual creativity formulating in buildable form. The qualities that are inherently produced by CNC machining processes are then captured back into the three-dimensional environment (CAD), and then re-exported via CNC machining. The information that flows from the digital to the physical and then back again, creates new physical qualities that would not normally be produced, and allows for further investigation. Through the misrepresentation and reinterpretation of machine processes in this research, the output produces an object of an abstract nature created through identifying extraordinary expressions of tool paths. This 1:1 abstract object expresses qualities of craft produced by the CNC machine and creates a new form of craft that can be compared to the expression of the traditional craftsman and their trade. This simple movement between scales and formats begins to generate new design processes that in turn translate the conceptual expression of the object into a buildable form. On final completion of the object this project has proven that CAM conceptual creativity can be translated and formulated into built form. A key observation of this research is that identifying CAM production techniques can produce abstract representation through a new means of design representation.

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  • Consensus Gained, Consensus Maintained? Changing New Zealand's Electoral Law 1927-2007

    Christmas, James (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In the eighty years between the passage of New Zealand's first unified Electoral Act in 1927, and the passage of the Electoral Finance Act 2007, the New Zealand Parliament passed 66 acts that altered or amended New Zealand's electoral law. One central assumption of theories of electoral change is that those in power only change electoral rules strategically, in order to protect their self-interest.1 This thesis is an investigation into the way New Zealand governments effect and have effected their desired changes to the electoral law through the legislative process, and the roles self-interest and the active search for consensus between political parties have played in that process. It argues that, while self-interest serves as a compelling explanation for a great deal of electoral law change in New Zealand, altruistic motivations and the development of parliamentary processes influenced behaviour to an equal, and perhaps even greater, extent.

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  • Strengthening the Effectiveness of Aid Delivery in Teacher Education: A Fiji Case Study

    Ruru, Donasiano Kalou (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    As a result of increasing development challenges and higher aid allocations to the Pacific, questions of aid effectiveness have become increasingly important. Efforts to professionalise aid delivery tools have been accompanied by debates over whether delivery tools are effective and compatible with more democratic and empowering relationships with beneficiaries. My research examines the effectiveness of international aid to teacher development, using the AusAID funded projects at Lautoka Teachers' College as a case study and the Fiji College of Advanced Education as background study. The conditions governing aid delivery mechanisms are explored, including logical frameworks, participatory processes, and financial probity. These conditions have been drawn from the 'Paris Declaration of Aid Effectiveness' and each is considered to be critical if aid effectiveness is to be enhanced and the investment sustained. Based on participatory research methodology, carried out through 'talanoa sessions', semià à ¢ structured interviews, and analysis of programme documents, the study explored the extent to which aid programmes and management practices are constrained by donor conditions, succeed in meeting their stated aims, and what sort of unintended consequences are generated. Further, the research identified how aid can best improve future aid to the Fiji education system through its delivery, impact and sustainability for national development, as laid out in the Pacific Principles of Aid Effectiveness The study also highlights the growing convergence between the 'aid donors' interests' and 'aid recipients' needs'. The debate on this relationship is necessary to reinvigorate thinking on the effectiveness of aid delivery for Fiji. The study draws up a practical framework, an aid bure designed as a heuristic device to assess the effectiveness of aid delivery for Fiji. The model may also be relevant to the wider Pacific context, and contribute to the global quest for a concrete guide to best practice which above all will continue to foster more sensitive, effective and enduring links between recipient countries and international aid donors.

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  • The Role of Analogy in Adaptive Explanation

    Currie, Adrian Mitchell (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Cases of 'convergence' (traits which have independently evolved in two or more lineages) could play an important role in the construction and corroboration of adaptive hypotheses. In particular, they could inform us about the evolutionary histories of novel traits. However, there is a problem of causal depth in the use of analogies. Natural Selection's affect on phenotype is constrained by phylogenetic history to a degree that we are unfounded in projecting adaptive stories from one lineage to another. I will argue for two approaches to resolve this issue. First, by constraining our catchment area to closely related lineages we can control for developmental noise. Second, by integrating analogies into explanations which incorporate other streams of evidence or bootstrapping an analogous model across many instantiations, we can overcome the problem of causal depth.

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  • Rapanui and Chile, a Debate on Self-Determination: A Notional and Legal Basis for the Political Decolonisation of Easter Island

    Gómez S., Rodrigo A. (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This project is an ambitious attempt to review the tie between Chile and Rapanui according to law. According to Gonschor the people of Easter Island are entitled to obtain political decolonisation according to the United Nations' parameters and international treaties of which Chile is signatory. This means that the thesis supports the proposition that Easter Island is "the" Chilean colony in Oceania, a belief shared by an important, though so far unquantifiable number of the island's citizens who have internationally raised the question no fewer than three times, in the recent past...

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  • Market Structure and Equilibrium in a Hydro Dominated Electricity Market

    Lu, Andrea (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Hydro generation plays an important role in electricity generation, especially in countries like New Zealand where 60 to 65 percent of electricity is generated in the hydro sector. In contrast to other types of electricity generation, for example gas generation, hydro generation has two unique properties: uncertainty regarding future resource availability and the ability to store the nature resource. Although hydro resource is often considered to be ‘free’, the ability to store creates an endogenous hidden marginal cost of water: usage today entails the loss of the ability to be used in future periods. Therefore pricing in a hydro dominated electricity market should be different from the approaches applied in markets that consist of generation methods that use only non-storable resources. This paper introduces a tractable approach to model a hydro dominated electricity market that incorporates inter-temporal decision making. It enables us to compute the equilibrium outcomes and the endogenous hidden marginal cost of water under different market structures.

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  • Children’s Memory for Mild Emotional Information: Positive and Negative Emotional Information and Associations with Temperament

    McIvor, Janelle L. (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The 2 aims of the current study were to investigate 1) children’s memory for positive and negative emotional information and 2) the influence of temperament on the type of emotional information recalled. Seventy-five children aged 61-77 months participated in a staged event, “Visiting the Pretend Zoo”. Approximately 6-9 days later children participated in a memory interview. Parents/caregivers completed a temperament questionnaire. Children recalled more negative relative to positive emotional information. Children higher in Effortful Control (EC) recalled more negative emotional information relative to children lower in EC. This indicates that EC may play an important role in children’s memory. No other effects of temperament were identified. Limitations of the current study are discussed followed by directions for future study.

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  • Pulling Teeth

    Smith, Sam (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Pulling Teeth is a 13x half hour comedy series in the vein of 30 Rock and Green Wing ... New graduate Rob Hutchinson hates the global view that all dentists are money hungry sadists who would kill a kitten just for kicks. Rob strives to use the clinic to prove the world wrong, and maybe in the process he'll win the romantic attention of Kate. But it's going to be difficult with the staff he inherits. South African playboy dentist Joost Pint is too clueless to know that he is out of line when working on patients in nothing but socks and a plastic gold crown. Receptionist Kate Barker's need for superiority makes her blind to Rob’s awkward advances, but absolutely fine with selling clinic supplies on the black market ...

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  • The Synthesis of Aigialomycin D Analogues

    Ting, Samuel Z.Y. (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Aigialomycin D is a fungal natural product possessing kinase inhibition properties. It is a member of a class of compounds known as the resorcylic acid lactones, a expansive group containing compounds exhibiting a vast array of biological activities. These include kinase and Hsp90 inhibition, highly desirable properties in the drug development field. This research project sought to capitalise on previous work involving the successful total synthesis of aigialomycin D. By developing the synthetic methodology, analogues of aigialomycin D could be prepared for biological testing to obtain valuable structure-activity relationship information. The focus of this thesis involves the successful synthesis of aigialomycin D diastereomer, 5',6'-epi,epi-aigialomycin D and the attempted synthesis of 100-epi-aigialomycin D, via the synthetic strategy developed previously in combination with enantiomeric starting material fragments ... The synthesis of functional group analogues, 6'-oxo-aigialomycin D, 7',8'-cyclopropyl aigialomycin D and 5-chloro-agialomycin D were also attempted via derivatisation of late-stage intermediates in the aigialomycin D synthesis. The thesis herein recounts the successes and failures in the synthesis of various aigialomycin D analogues ...

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  • A Comparison of Repeated MDMA- and AMPH-Produced Centre and Periphery Activity and the Underlying Neuroadaptations

    Bradbury, Sarah J. (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The recreational use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or 'ecstasy') is increasing in New Zealand. MDMA is a ring-substituted derivative of AMPH and, similar to AMPH, produces hyperactivity upon administration. However, the behavioural profile of hyperlocomotion produced by MDMA differs from that produced by AMPH, suggesting that different neural mechanisms underlie the behavioural response. The repeated administration of both MDMA and AMPH induces sensitised hyperactive responses that have recently been found to be different. In the present study, MDMA- and AMPH-induced centre and periphery hyperactivity were compared to investigate the neuroadaptations produced by repeated exposure to the two drugs. Rats were pre-treated with saline, MDMA, or AMPH and the acute response to MDMA, AMPH, or the D1 agonist, SKF-81297 was measured to determine whether cross-sensitisation was produced. Repeated administration of MDMA and AMPH produced similar behavioural profiles. However, cross-sensitisation between the two drugs was uni-directional, suggesting that the two produce different neuroadaptations. Repeated AMPH, but not MDMA, produced a sensitised response to the hyperlocomotor effects of SKF-81297, suggesting that D1 receptor mechanisms are one example of different neuroadaptations.

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  • Te Aukume o Taku Reo: He Aha nga Wheako ki ta te Akonga e whai Hua ai i roto i nga Wananga Rumaki?

    Muller, Maureen (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The perilous state of the Maori language in Aotearoa continues to have an impact on the social, cultural and linguistic identity of Maori. Despite this critical state, Maori have been at the forefront of language revitalisation amongst Indigenous peoples globally. For over 30 years Maori have worked towards reversing language shift through different language revitalisation movements. These diverse language revitalisation initiatives recognise the importance of immersion wananga in not only the acquisition of language and culture but also in understanding and appreciating Maori identity. This thesis will examine the significance of immersion wananga and how this uniquely Maori pedagogical paradigm extends the student's learning experience beyond just the acquisition of language.

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  • Intergenerational equity in municipal accounting: New Zealand 1910s

    Colquhoun, Philip (2010)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Accounting for fixed assets by municipalities has been discussed in the accounting history literature previously. This paper addresses two issues related to accounting for fixed assets not previously discussed; the influence of the principle of intergenerational equity on local government accounting, and the influence of users of accounting information in accounting policy making in government accounting. The paper identifies that users of accounting information have had significant influence in a debate on government accounting policy, and that the principle of intergenerational equity was given a position of high importance in the debate, but not an unchallengeable position. The motivation of the users of accounting information to engage in the debates is identified as a form of civic duty, which is consistent with the ethical imperative in ensuring intergenerational equity.

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  • Non-Radiative Processes and Vibrational Pumping in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Galloway, Christopher (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The main focus of this thesis was the physical interpretation of the pumping cross-section. This was achieved by performing a statistical analysis of single molecule vibrational pumping events in which both the SERS and pumping cross-sections could be measured simultaneously. Samples were constructed in which small aggregates of silver colloids were evenly distributed on a dry surface. The sample was then cooled to 77K so that the main mechanism for creating a vibrational population was through Stokes scattering. Spatial mappings were then performed which measured how the SERS spectrum varied with position on the sample and the single molecule events were identified. The SERS cross-sections were determined from the Stokes intensity while the pumping cross-sections were determined from the ratio of the anti-Stokes and Stokes peaks. It was observed that the pumping cross-section was often significantly larger than the SERS cross-section, as much as four orders of magnitude in some cases. Several attempts were made to explain this discrepancy including the possibility of the surface plasmon resonance favouring anti-Stokes scattering, underestimated lifetimes for the vibrational modes, and additional pumping from fluorescence. However, the most likely candidate was non-radiative Stokes scattering by the observed molecule which would increase the vibrational population but would not increase the Stokes intensity. To estimate the proportion of scattered light that is radiative or non-radiative, single molecule measurements were performed under both surface-enhanced and unmodified conditions. By comparing the fluorescence and Raman intensities under these scenarios, it was possible to estimate the radiative and non-radiative enhancement factors. It was found that the non-radiative SERS cross-section was typically much larger than the radiative cross-section for samples consisting of aggregated silver colloids. The discrepancy between the pumping and SERS cross-section (which is the radiative cross-section) could therefore be explained by non-radiative scattering dominating the creation of the vibrational population, along with an additional contribution due to the plasmon resonance favouring certain vibrational modes. Furthermore, the lifetime of a molecule after it has been excited to the first electronic state was estimated to be as short as 25 fs. It would be impossible to measure lifetimes of this order of magnitude in single molecules using time-resolved techniques. Furthermore, to the very best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an experimental determination of the non-radiative SERS cross-section has been made.

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  • Relational Pedagogy in a New Zealand Secondary School Drama Classroom

    Wallis, Caroline (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Aspects of relational pedagogy were examined in a Year 13 Drama classroom in a large state secondary school over a week of lessons. The teacher and six students who volunteered to take part in the research were observed then interviewed about the nature of relationships in the classroom that week, and in general. The teacher and students in the class related to each other in a positive and constructive manner as they worked together on developing a piece of drama. The students reflected on the importance of their relationship with their teacher and their peers as part of their learning. These findings suggest the nature of how Drama is taught promotes the development of relationships in a classroom. This development impacts positively on their understanding of themselves and others, and their learning in and of Drama.

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  • From Hobbyists to Professionals: the Evolution of New Zealand Textile Artists: a Selective Annotated Bibliography of Resources

    Lam, Lai Heung (2010)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    From Hobbyists to Professionals: the Evolution of New Zealand Textile Artists: a Selective Annotated Bibliography of Resources

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  • Participation, Power and Practice in Development: A Case Study of Theoretical Doctrines and International Agency Practice in Tuvalu

    Wrighton, Nicki (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research examines the conventions and understandings of ‘good’ development practice surrounding consultation, participation and their relationship to aid effectiveness and absorptive capacity in the context of a small island developing country, Tuvalu. The study will identify contemporary development intervention patterns in Tuvalu and will explore tensions emerging within the Tuvalu Government as it services the needs of its population as a sovereign nation while also servicing the needs of a multiplicity of development partners.

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