524 results for Scholarly text, 2012

  • The Way of Steve Lacy: Finding Individuality through Musical Genealogy

    Johnson, Lucien (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research project traces Lacy’s life in music, looking at his long period of apprenticeship, the brief but important period in which he focussed exclusively on free improvisation, and the subsequent years spent formulating and creating his own music. It uses both musical analysis of his improvisations and his compositions and commentary on the path he chose, in an attempt to define his place in 20th century music and the legacy he leaves us. The second part of the project involves my own compositions, which investigate areas similar to those which Lacy explored in his lifetime. These include finding a relationship between composition and improvisation in which both methods are given equal value. Their respective qualities, such as the collective interplay found in improvisation or the structure that composition supplies, are being cultivated. The point of these works is not to investigate methods of composition or conduction in which improvisation or semi-improvisation can be integrated. In this music the improvisers have as few limitations as possible, so that they are free to improvise. The works merely look to find a balance where these two methods can co-exist. The pieces are mostly idiomatic although they use genre as a point of departure rather than a fixed entity. They attempt to transcend, or in some cases to subvert, the idiom to which they are referring. They have been written intuitively and developed and refined through live performance. The compositions for the ensemble, The Troubles, were developed over a year of weekly live performances and there was a degree of autonomy and democracy for all the performers. A score in this music is perhaps akin to many of the practices to be found in the creation of contemporary theatre, where a text can be treated, elaborated upon, toyed with, where there are moments where things have been devised by the ensemble, rather than viewed as a sacred object. It is possible to imagine that Lacy too worked in this manner with his regular group. In these pieces I have tried to heed Braque’s lessons, and to avoid mimicry, yet in this work I hope to capture something of the spirit of Steve Lacy.

    View record details
  • Decadal Climate Oscillations, Synoptic Variability, and Ice Core Climate Proxy Records in the Ross Sea Region, Antarctica

    Markle, Bradley Ross (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis investigates synoptic variability in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica and develops geochemical proxies of this variability from an ice core record in Southern Victoria Land. Particular focus is given to the influence of decadal climate oscillations on synoptic conditions and potential records of these oscillations in ice core proxy records as long-­‐term records of these oscillations are important for understanding future climate change. I present an investigation of the joint influence of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on variability in the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), a dominant climatological feature that strongly influences the weather in the Ross Sea region. It is shown that the positive phase of each oscillation is associated with significant strengthening of the ASL, while negative phases are associated with a weakening. Through regression analysis I show that a simple linear combination of indices representing these oscillations can explain more than 40% of the geopotential height variance in the AS region at a seasonal scale and over 70% of the variance at an annual scale. These results are consistent with the known mechanisms of ENSO and SAM interaction in the region and show that while SAM is dominant hemispherically, ENSO is only influential in the Pacific Sector. Finally it is demonstrated that a simple model of linear reinforcement and interference between the oscillations describes their influence on the variability in the ASL better than models incorporating more complex interactions. Atmospheric back-­‐trajectory modeling and cluster analysis are used to investigate synoptic variability at the Gawn Ice Piedmont (GIP) ice core site in the Ross Sea Region, Antarctica. I identify two dominant air-­‐mass trajectory clusters: oceanic – cyclonic and continental trajectories. My analysis shows that oceanic – cyclonic trajectories peak during April (southern hemisphere winter), while continental trajectories reach their maximum during December (summer). A causal association is demonstrated between ENSO and the frequency of oceanic – cyclonic trajectories originating from the Ross Sea region. In contrast, it is shown that the Southern Annular Mode has little influence on the frequency of cyclonic clusters. I then develop proxy records for the synoptic variability using a shallow firn core from the GIP site containing 8 years of geochemical record. Continental trajectories correlate with concentrations of nitrate (NO3), which is sourced from stratospheric air-­‐masses descending over the Antarctic interior. Oceanic – cyclonic trajectory clusters strongly correlate with deuterium excess at seasonal and inter-­‐annual scales, a proxy sensitive to changes in relative humidity and sea surface temperature (SST) in the in the Ross and Amundsen Seas. Decadal variability in the frequency of oceanic – cyclonic trajectories is discussed with respect to ENSO, SAM, and changes in SST and sea ice extent.

    View record details
  • An Examination of the Chance Elements in Witold Lutosławski's Music, with Particular Attention to Its Function as a Model for Compositional Practice

    Hextall, Pieta (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis studies the use of aleatory techniques in Witold Lutosławski's music and the issues that arise when using aleatoricism, a branch of textural composition that has room for exploration. I focused my study on three of Lutosławski's major works, analysing his approach to aleatoricism, form, and macro- and micro-rhythm. I wrote three works for the portfolio component. My approach to aleatoricism differed in each work. Through studying Lutosławski and my own composition, I came across practical issues in creating the score, issues with performers, and compositional problems. However, once these issues were worked though, aleatoricism is a exciting compositional device that is not yet tired.

    View record details
  • The Organization of the Islamic Cooperation and the Conflict in Southern Thailand

    Waesahmae, Paoyee (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The current wave of insurgency in the southern provinces of Thailand, where the majority of population are Muslim, sparked up in 2004 but shows no sign of ending in the near future. The insurgency caused by the conflict in the region which, along the time, has risen and fallen depending on surrounding circumstances. Given the scale and intensity of the conflict, it has increasingly attracted the attention of the outside world especially the Islamic world since the conflict is believed to be connected with religious elements. Despite of this, no specific Islamic countries have played a direct role in intervention in the conflict. The only intervention involved in the conflict was carried out by the OIC, a representative of 57 Islamic countries. This essay attempts to examine the intervention of the OIC into the conflict in the southern provinces of Thailand in the name of Islamic countries in order to protect the rights of Muslim minorities as it claims and will explore the consequences of the tension between the OIC’s mission to uphold these rights and sovereign states.

    View record details
  • An Annotated Bibliography of Information Resources Chronicling The Jewish Experience In New Zealand: From 1828 to 2012

    Bailey, Carrie (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This annotated bibliography is designed to provide brief analyses of a comprehensive selection of publications that exemplify the experience of Jewish lives in New Zealand from the earliest settlement records in 1828 to 2012. These resources have been complied from fictional and non-fictional sources; print, audio and visual media; and both Jewish and non-Jewish authors from inside and outside of New Zealand. They chronicle the events from the period before the first synagogues were built though the development of Jewish New Zealander‘s unusual relationship with the Maori to the influx of refugees from World War II and their eventual assimilation into the broader New Zealand culture.

    View record details
  • Auto-Ethnography in a Kabyle Landscape

    Taieb, Si Belkacem (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In this auto-ethnography, as an indigenous man in a Kabyle landscape, I take into account the relational experience that involves the development of a Kabyle identity. The indigenous cultures in North of Africa all come from the same family called the Imazighen (free men). Kabyle live in the North East of Algeria but there are other Imazighen living in the diaspora all over North Africa, from Morocco to Egypt, like Touaregs or Mozabites. My inquiry narrates my personal experience as a Kabyle man born of Kabyle parents in France. In this auto-ethnography I return to my father’s village to understand and access my heritage. I hope that this narrative helps my readers to reflect on the effects of globalization on the transmission of indigenous cultures. I portray Algeria, a North African Muslim country in 2010. I draw on critical pedagogy, socio-constructivism and indigenous knowledge and experiences. Looking to Algeria with the perspective of an indigenous person, I explore the social organization in my village and the way values and relationship shape the traditional education of a Kabyle man. My experiences and research in my ancestral village show that the war Kabyle people have fought against France has not resulted in independence. Rather, in my case, decolonization made me twice stranger to myself as Kabyle in an Arabic dominated country but also as an immigrant in France, the old colonial country, and Canada. However, my spiritual and sacred heritage is still alive in me, shaped by both my own experiences and the teachings of other members of my culture, and I have expressed this heritage throughout this narrative.

    View record details
  • Psychometric Validation and Demographic Differences in Two Recently Developed Trait Mindfulness Measures

    Sturgess, Margaret A (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Although in recent years an increasingly large body of mindfulness research has accrued, there continues to be a lack of information about how to measure trait mindfulness, as well as whether it varies across demographic variables such as age and gender. Four hundred and six participants from across New Zealand completed a battery of self-report measures in order to examine demographic differences in mindfulness, as well as to look at how mindfulness predicts outcome variables such as happiness and depression. Additionally, psychometric validation was undertaken on two new trait measures of mindfulness: the Toronto Mindfulness Scale, which did not demonstrate good psychometric validity, and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, which did demonstrate good psychometric validity. This study found that females reported higher levels of mindfulness than males, though males demonstrated a stronger mediating relationship between mindfulness and happiness. In addition, higher levels of mindfulness were reported by older individuals; however, young adults manifested the strongest negative relationship between mindfulness and depression across the lifespan. These findings are then discussed in the context of clinical utility and future research.

    View record details
  • Literature and Cognitive Science

    Johnson, Alex (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The field of Literature and Cognitive Science is an emergent one. This thesis investigates ways in which knowledge generated about the brain and mind in the field of Literature can complement knowledge generated about the brain and mind in the field of Cognitive Science. The work of a representative selection of literary critics who identify themselves as working within and shaping the field of Literature and Cognitive Science will be examined, and the representation of brain-mind states in two contemporary novels, Haruki Murakami's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World and Pat Cadigan's Tea from an Empty Cup, will be closely analysed. A principal aim of this investigation is to affirm the power of literary and literary critical texts as potent and relevant knowledge sources about the brain and mind that must be included in our understanding of cognition. In this respect it will support the position of those in the field of Literature and Cognitive Science who argue that knowledge created in the field of Literature can enrich the new understanding of human cognition being developed in the field of Cognitive Science.

    View record details
  • The Effects of Digital Technologies on Expanded Cinema in the Age of Liquid Modernity: Drowning and Surfacing in the Expanded Seas of the Digital Cinema

    Sarubin, Horst C (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis is submitted as one part of a three-part Masters program: it is accompanied by two creative praxis: a short film and video installation. The thesis itself mirrors the creative elements of the praxis and should be read in that light. It consists of writing and formatting style not usually found in academic writing. The font and formatting changes are designed to facilitate the reader’s experience and recognition of various points of view personified within. ...

    View record details
  • Mathematical Modelling of Acute Rheumatic Fever

    Welsh, Melissa (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Acute rheumatic fever is a major cause of heart disease in many parts of the world. Though it is generally considered rare in developed countries, is remains a large issue in New Zealand. Of particular concern is the prevalence of acute rheumatic fever among Maori and Paci c Island peoples. In this thesis we develop a model to simulate acute rheumatic fever in a population. We discuss the use of both deterministic methods and stochastic processes. Demographics and statistics speci c to New Zealand are then used to develop the model in a way that ts speci cally to the situation in New Zealand. We also consider the introduction of treatment strategies for acute rheumatic fever and discuss how risk factors can be used to focus such strategies.

    View record details
  • Intertidal Community Differences Between the Cook Strait and Wellington Harbour

    Tam, Jamie C. (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Wellington Harbour which lies near the southern tip of the North Island, New Zealand, exhibits a typical rocky intertidal shoreline with groups of species similar to those found on many temperate rocky coasts around the world. A short distance away, the Cook Strait displays a very different shoreline in community composition compared with Wellington Harbour, most notably a distinct lack of filter feeders. This thesis aims to examine how exactly the community composition is different between the two coasts at a species level and if there are any environmental factors that can explain the differing distributions. Here, a series of field and laboratory experiments aim to examine why certain filter feeders (mussels) are absent from the Cook Strait shore, yet so abundant in Wellington Harbour ... This work indicates that the Cook Strait coastline has lower filter feeder abundances and an overall different community composition than Wellington Harbour. The cause of these differences appears to be bottom up regulation through the lack of food availability (phytoplankton) during winter months in the Cook Strait. The high commercial value of coastal environments in both fisheries and tourism heightens the need to understand these habitats. Unravelling the complex relationships between the seasonal changes in the water column and onshore biota is important for conserving and protecting these essential ecosystems in New Zealand and temperate shores worldwide.

    View record details
  • Dominion

    Harrison, Leon Thomas (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    FADE IN: New Zealand. 2020s. While Wellington has suffered a major earthquake and is on the way to recovery, Masterton is complete disintegration ...

    View record details
  • Hakarongo Mai! Rapanui Women and Decolonisation for Development

    Christ, Karly Gempp (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    On the Pacific island of Rapa Nui, there are growing calls from the indigenous population for political and cultural decolonisation. This research explores and documents how some women in Rapa Nui are engaging in these struggles. It investigates their aspirations for decolonisation and the strategies they are employing to have their voices heard. It also identifies and describes some of the challenges these women have faced as well as the successes they have had in the context of these struggles to date. Sharing the stories of women who are active participants in these efforts, this research seeks to provide space for their perspectives and their experiences, acknowledging the presence and significance of women within decolonisation efforts on Rapa Nui.

    View record details
  • The Creation of a Birthing Centre: Considering the Prevention of Post-Natal Depression.

    Mazurkiewicz, Tanya (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis explores the notion of interior architecture as a tool in the prevention on of post natal depression. This research is part of a larger and current theoretical argument that places interior architecture in a catalyst role for the prevention of mental illness. Initial research shows that the act of giving birth and its physical and mental recovery are tightly linked to the potential development of depressive disorder. Accordingly this research will explore the spatial requirements for birthing with the prevention of mental disorder in mind. The design will be developed at the intersection of a series of criteria of spatial qualities in the prevention of depressive orders and evidence based hospital design parameters for birthing. This research aims to establish a comprehensive base guideline specific for the design of birthing centres, focusing on the prevention of post natal depression. The design here presented is a series of tests and assessment of this guideline.

    View record details
  • Institutional Repositories in New Zealand: An Analysis of Coordinators’ Perspectives

    Benseman, Gregory James (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study is a small scale qualitative survey of coordinators working in institutional repository development in New Zealand since critical mass was reached in 2009. It aims to summarise their opinions on the current and future roles of their repository as both a preservation archive, and a discovery resource representing their institution’s research community. The research uses narrative development techniques within the interpretivist paradigm to provide a contextual analysis of the repository’s relationship with other repositories and the National Library. It is supported by quantitative analysis of the sampled repositories’ holdings and the metadata quality with which the holdings are endowed. The analysis finds that since the establishment of New Zealand repositories, coordinators have adapted their collection strategies to encourage depositors towards Open Access publishing. These findings are placed in the context of the growth of non-mandated repository holdings and the technical infrastructure for harvesting resources, and integrating workflows with university research management systems. The results are used to discuss the goals coordinators have for improving the efficiency and visibility of their repository.

    View record details
  • The Great New Zealand Botnet: Broadband to the Door an Asset or Security Issue?

    Gibson, Kyle (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research explores the level of security awareness, of domestic Internet users in New Zealand. Awareness and online security are the top priorities of the New Zealand Cyber Security Strategy, but little research has been conducted to gauge the current level of security awareness in context with common mitigation strategies. The majority of the literature on the subject is primarily focused on organisational technology security and awareness so this had to be put in context with domestic users. A sample set of Facebook friends of the researcher were asked to respond to an online survey. The survey explored the respondents' attitude and selfevaluated level of security awareness, and their awareness of a subset of mitigation strategies from the Australian Defence Signals Directorates' 'Strategies to Mitigate Targeted Cyber Intrusions'. The respondents demonstrated a good level of security awareness regarding patching and anti-virus, but there is a need for more education regarding access control and social engineering.

    View record details
  • Watch Over Me: A Pilot for a Television Drama Series

    Bagshaw, James (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    A screenplay

    View record details
  • 50 Years of Construction Camps and Single Purpose Towns in the South

    Kinsella, Fleur (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis aims to ascertain lessons which can be learnt from the provision of accommodation at a progression of hydro projects in the south of New Zealand. Seven case studies have been distilled from a wide range (and number) of existing documents and literature and collated in a manner unavailable in current literature in order to allow the researcher to compare and contrast them with a historical-interpretive methodology. The analyses culminate in conclusions regarding site conditions, accommodation and layout designs and sense of community and the effect that these have had on past hydro project accommodations. This is done in order to provide a platform for further research into the development of guidelines for future large construction camps and single purpose towns within New Zealand, now that the designer and provider of the camps and towns which form the case studies in this thesis (the MoWD) has been abolished.

    View record details
  • Blizzard City: Built Environment and Civilization in Antarctica, 1911-1961

    Moffat-Wood, Alex (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis investigates four Antarctic built environments between 1911 and 1961: Robert Falcon Scott’s 1910-1912 Terra Nova expedition base at Cape Evans, Ross Island; Sir Douglas Mawson’s 1911-1914 Australasian Antarctic Expedition base at Commonwealth Bay; Australia’s Mawson Station in MacRobertson Land, founded in 1954; and New Zealand’s Scott Base, also on Ross Island, founded in 1957. Examining unpublished and published diaries of expeditioners, government files and newspaper reports, this thesis demonstrates that, to the expeditioners who built and occupied them, these places created protective bastions of civilization in an extreme environment. It investigates what residents and architects (figurative and literal) thought and felt about these blizzard cities, their meaning and significance. In doing so, this study reinforces, extends, and at times challenges broader conceptions of built environment, nature, civilization, Antarctica, and their thicket of interrelationships. The first two chapters – one focused on the Heroic Era and the second on the post-WWII bases – argue that Antarctic built environments were embattled, modern sanctuaries. The extreme environment of Antarctica also demonstrated to expeditioners that built environment had plasticity, which challenged the expeditioners’ expectation of built environment being stable, durable, and impermeable. Chapter three argues that Antarctic built environment allowed expeditioners to create civilization in the wilderness, in a variety of ways. Through examining facets of occupation such as etiquette and international cooperation, the chapter argues that civilization took many forms, not all of them positive from the expeditioners’ point-of-view.

    View record details
  • Faces of the Captives: Aesthetic Distance and Emotional Absorption in Young Children's Engagement with Theatre

    Swallow, Catherine (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    When Captain Hook has the lost boys tied up on his ship he cannot recognise that the sparkle on the ‘faces of the captives’ is the thrill of mimesis. It has been suggested that if young children cannot distinguish between reality and illusion then instead of suspending disbelief in the stage world, they will actually believe and therefore experience a dangerous level of emotional absorption. Using Peter Pan as a frame of reference, this thesis examines responses to three contemporary theatre works, Capital E National Theatre for Children’s Songs of the Sea and Boxes and Scottish company Catherine Wheels’ White to challenge the idea that aesthetic distance provides a necessary protective function. Instead, it will be argued that the imagination, empathy and emotion contagion provide the conditions in which children can capably enter the aesthetic space of fictional worlds on stage.

    View record details