5,979 results for Scholarly text

  • Generic Purpose Thematic Data Analysis Made Easy

    Jowsey, Tanisha (2016-04-27)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    This resource provides a practical step-by-step guide towards undertaking thematic analysis of health-related qualitative material.

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  • Qualitative methodology made easy

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Desborough, J (2016-08-12)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    This resource provides an outline of main philosophical paradigms (constructionism, constructivism, and phenomenology) and qualitative research methods.

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  • Identifying and referencing images

    Jowsey, Tanisha (2016-10-11)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    This resource provides information about identifying and referencing images from the internet using Creative Commons.

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  • Revisiting the Hillside: Organic, Aggregative Medium Density Housing in a Wellington Hillside Environment

    Wenden, Matthew (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The ‘Conzen School’ of Urban Morphology identified by Kostof in his book The City Shaped, is a western way of looking at parcels of land, lots, and the street grid from above in a geometric manner imposed on the land, then analysing this in terms of land use pattern, town plan, and building form. This model of analysis and development lends itself to flat sites, and separated, isolated developments, and forms the basis for the existing model of development in western colonial nations. This thesis investigates whether an alternate development approach based on aggregative design can provide a viable alternative to the standard model of Medium Density Housing found in New Zealand. Investigation in the frame of Christopher Alexander’s New Theory of Urban Design, Lucien Kroll, and The New Urbanists addresses a new way of approaching these sites through the use of organic geometries and accumulative principals. Accompanying and informing this approach is a case study of vernacular Cycladic Architecture. In balance with the Cycladic case study the thesis addresses the acceptance of this model of development in a New Zealand context. In particular, with reference to the physical aspects of privacy, view, shared space as well as perceptions of ownership, individuality and identity in a higher density environment. The aggregative approach is similar to that explored through Ian Athfield’s Home in Khandallah; Athfield House. This housing and office complex is an early experiment into the same principles that this thesis addresses. The thesis develops a methodological approach to testing the aggregative nature of development and simulates this through the use of in studio design exercises. These exercises will be a combination of external input from other designers and internal; single author input. The final design outcome will be addressing the results of this simulation, the design principals, guidelines and rules, rather than producing a stand-alone design artifact.

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  • Pacific Regionalism: Historical Anachronism, or Pathway to Future Development?

    Davidson, Elspeth (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study looks at the relevance of regional organisations in the Pacific Island region. It analyses the history of the key regional organisations: the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS). Since their establishment, there has been extensive criticism of the work of these organisations. This study tests and analyses the issue of legitimacy within supra-national organisations, and questions whether regionalism in the Pacific is an anachronism of the past. In the Pacific, regionalism puts out a compelling argument for its existence. Throughout the region, small island developing states are spread across the world’s largest ocean. Pacific Island states face many challenges, including: small economies, geographical disadvantages, vulnerability to climate change, varying availability to resources and a diverse range of cultures and languages. Regionalism provides a chance for these island states to influence world policy, build capacity in the region, promote good governance, maintain peaceful neighbourly relations, and create positive development outcomes. The methodology uses qualitative research of document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key informants. The research claims a social constructivist epistemology and uses an inductive conceptual framework in order to find solutions to the complex challenges of Pacific regionalism. It was found that regional organisations need to increase their transparency in order to enhance their legitimacy. They need provide a clearer evidence base, where all Pacific people can recognise and understand the benefit of regional organisations. The organisations need to work strategically to be nimble and reactive to upcoming critical junctures and issues. Council of Regional Organisations in the Pacific (CROP) agencies need to coordinate better amongst themselves, open up communication with all stakeholders and create clearer mandates. In order to promote positive development, all stakeholders and Pacific people need to take ownership of these organisations, and support the Framework for Pacific Regionalism process. This study argues that there is great potential for regionalism in the Pacific, but this will only be possible if the region works collectively to enhance the legitimacy of these organisations.

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  • The House Reformed: A Reaction to Suburban Monotony

    Mangan, Florence (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Joyless rows of monotonous houses are be- ginning to define the suburban typology of tomorrow. Quality and innovation is being compromised for speed and quantity and there is a distinct lack of consideration for the home’s potential to enrich and influence the life-styles and well-being of its occupants. This thesis is a reaction to the researcher’s dis- satisfaction with New Zealand’s suburban typology and seeks to identify and demonstrate an alternative design approach. The research- er considers that a house should enable its occupants to flourish by instigating moments of joy and surprise whilst maximising economy of space. The thesis uses an investigative research method of five different design tests. Each test reveals strategies to aid the approach of designing the suburban typology, focusing on maximising joy, surprise and economy of space. Both digital and manual methods are used, revealing their respective strengths and flaws. The Digital method used in the Data House and Rigid x Fluid house tests lacked the ability to apply tangible aesthetic qualities to a de- sign. The manual hands on method of used in the Patchwork House and House Reformed tests was hugely beneficial for the aesthetic qualities of design, however it lacked the rigor and capacity to apply individuality on a mass scale. Discoveries made in the thesis investigations are collated in a final design outcome, the House Reformed. This house design demonstrates a compilation of the successful strategies identified in the research and reveals the benefits of approaching home design with qualities of joy, surprise and economy of space. The most successful strategies used to achieve these aims were establishing a great- er connection with the outdoors, providing flexible spaces through the use of innovative partitions and furniture and injecting unexpected aesthetic moments through the use of interesting texture and colour. Overall the research reveals a successful de- sign outcome and provides interesting in- sights into design method. It explores worth- while questions and issues related to the lived domestic experience such as the lack of joy, surprise and economy of space in suburban housing and demonstrates the importance of designing with such qualities.

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  • A History of Niue

    McDowell, David (1961)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    "In the beginning, this island now called Niue was nothing but coral rock (he punga)... There came a god, an aitu, from the south, a god sailed to and fro on the face of the waters. He looked down here and saw far below on the ocean the white punga rock. He let down his hook and hauled the punga up to the surface, and lo! there stood and island!" - John Lupo. The genesis of Niue remains conjectural. The Polynesian calls in a supernatural agency, an aitu from the south, to explain the emergence of the multiplication of corals and algae from the waters of the mid-Pacific to form an island two-hundred feet high, but the story of the god and his line and hook is a local adaptation of a very ancient and widespread fable, as are in varying degrees other Polynesian versions of the birth of the island, Cook advanced two further possibilities in 1777 when he speculated: "Has this Island been raised by an earthquake? Or has the sea receded from it?"

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  • A Communitys Urban Rejuvenation - The Cabarets Trouper

    Smith, Connie (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The 1990s brought innovation to retail shopping, enabling consumers to begin to shop from the comfort of their own home. Today, Online shopping continues to revolutionise the industry, creating a highly competitive market space while advancing “convenience shopping”. As customers can now purchase anything at their fingertips, those that choose to shop in-store find their desires are also competitively meet. Evolution within the retail industry has meant that many stores have become a part of “big box” developments. These facilities provide customers with readily stocked merchandise and the in-store experience of “convenience shopping”. Online shopping and Big Box stores will continue to lure people away from what once were vibrant urban retail environments posing various adverse effects on our streets, city centres and local businesses. Broadway Avenue, Palmerston North is one of many streets that have fallen victim to these developments creating unpleasant retail experiences for the community. This thesis argues how interior architecture can assist rejuvenating desolate urban environments. It proposes that by applying selected interior principles to an urban street it can create a space that begins to challenge the current programme encouraging the street to adapt for the community. This design based research proposes to create a community space ‘living room’ by treating the street as though it is a residential space within a retail environment. It aims to preserve and maintain a sense of history and diversity within the cityscape. The existing site attributes will be used to create a set of design rules and regulations within the shopping environment to encourage internal and external spaces to feed off one another adapting frequently to cope with the competitive nature of the retail sector.

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  • Television Sharknados and Twitter Storms: Cult Film Fan Practices in the Age of Social Media Branding.

    Hay, Stephen (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis examines the Syfy channel’s broadcast of the television movie Sharknado and the large number of tweets that were sent about it. Sharknado’s audience engaged in cult film viewing practices that can be understood using paracinema theory. Paracinema engagement with cult films has traditionally taken place in midnight screenings in independent movie theatres and private homes. Syfy’s audience was able to engage in paracinematic activity that included making jokes about Sharknado’s low quality of production and interacting with others who were doing the same through the affordances of Twitter. In an age where branding has become increasingly important, Syfy clearly benefited from all the fan activity around its programming. Critical branding theory argues that the value generated by a business’s brand comes from the labour of consumers. Brand management is mostly about encouraging and managing consumer labour. The online shift of fan practices has created new opportunities for brand managers to subsume the activities of consumers. Cult film audience practices often have an emphasis on creatively and collectively engaging in rituals and activities around a text. These are the precise qualities that brands require from their consumers. Sharknado was produced and marketed by Syfy to invoke the cult film subculture as part of Syfy’s branding strategy. This strategy can be understood using the theory of biopolitical marketing. Biopolitical marketing creates brands by encouraging and managing consumer activity on social media. Instead of simply promoting itself, a brand becomes an online platform through which consumers can engage. An active consumer base raises a brand’s profile and puts forward the image of happy, loyal customers. An equally important advantage of biopolitical marketing is that it can mask the marketing aspect of branding. Consumers who are cynical towards marketers may be less defensive towards a group of fellow consumers enjoying a product online. Developing a consumer community around a business where every consumer interaction enhances the brand and there is no semblance of marketer involvement is the end goal of biopolitical marketing. The subculture around cult films not only has brand-friendly practices, but is also positioned as being rebellious, a quality that can be particularly valuable in trying to mask the presence of marketing.

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  • Biodiversity planning for Victoria University of Wellington's Kelburn campus

    Forsyth, Frances Mary Jean (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Urbanisation changes the biotic and abiotic elements of natural environments irrevocably and almost always results in losses of indigenous species and habitats and the creation of new habitats. Humans are attracted to cities for social and economic reasons but put considerable effort into making life in cities more pleasant by creating urban green spaces where they can go, or which they can look at, to re-connect with the natural environment. Historically, large organisations and institutions, including universities, have also created park-like gardens for the benefit of their workers and students. This research concerns the 3.87 ha of garden and wilderness green space areas on the Victoria University of Wellington Kelburn campus (New Zealand). Established on a steep hillside in suburban Wellington in the early 1900s it now lies along the boundary of the Central Business District. Effective management of the grounds has become a priority in order that increasing numbers of students and staff may get more benefit from the services they provide, and the natural capital of both the campus and the city can be enhanced. A management plan incorporating recommendations from this research could guide biodiversity and environmental enhancement of the campus. As well as supporting urban biodiversity, and students and staff, these enhancement actions will strengthen and improve relationships with stakeholders, raising the profile of the university and bring its biodiversity policies in line with local government. For this study I measured tree frequency, density and species diversity on the Kelburn Campus and compared present day tree species richness with historic records for the campus, the Wellington Botanic Garden native forest remnants, and a local bush reserve. I also determined recruitment rates for campus trees. A total of 177 tree and shrub species were identified including plantings of 17 rare indigenous species. The overall diversity score was moderate (Shannon Weiner 3.023), and species richness on the campus had diminished from a high of 146 species in 1990. Without intervention species richness is likely to fall even further given that 81 species are currently represented by four or fewer trees. Recruitment data for weedy non-local species (both introduced and non-local indigenous) showed that there were significant numbers of these species in most size groups from seedling to mature trees. This indicates that greater control of these species is required. In the second part of the study I questioned members of the campus community about how they valued its green space, where they went and why, what they liked about their favourite places, and what they would like to see more or less of in campus green space. The results were, in general, consistent with the literature. Male staff were prepared to travel further than students to get to their favourite places and also showed a preference for exercise over relaxation; females showed slightly more preference than males for warm and sheltered spots, and students preferred relaxation and socialising over exercise as their reason for going to their favourite places. Access and seating were important and a large proportion of respondents wanted more warm sunny places and more birds. Large trees, native plants, flowers and lawns were also popular. These preferences were common to both students and staff. Victoria University expects that the Kelburn campus population could double in size over the next twenty years or so. This will place pressure on campus green space, five percent of which was lost to development in 2015. Through my research I have demonstrated that biodiversity gains could be achieved through effective management of pest plant species and judicious planting. Permanent protection and planned management of campus green space and recognition of it as a capital asset will be important for retaining staff and students, and for improving relationships with neighbours and stakeholders. Specific recommendations include: 1. Research into the food value for birds of Pseudopanax hybrids compared with local Pseudopanax species. 2. Research into the likelihood of local Pseudopanax species being forced into local extinction by hybrid species. 3. Develop a pest plant management plan. 4. Determine which soils in campus green space areas have high biodiversity potential and select plants accordingly. 5. Determine the needs of the multicultural campus community for green space. 6. Promote green space areas to staff and students as destinations and provide explanatory information regarding the natural and other values of particular sites. 7. Enhance natural and infrastructural elements of green spaces with planting, pest control, seating, shelter, and canopy gaps for sunshine. 8. Review access routes for pedestrian comfort, future capacity, connectivity with the surrounding neighbourhood, and accessibility for variously 'abled' people. Give campus roads and pathways names and signage.

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  • Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full Coalescent Analysis

    Bryant, D; Bouckaert, Remco; Felsenstein, J; Rosenberg, N; RoyChoudhury, A (2011-09-16)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    The multi-species coalescent provides an elegant theoretical framework for estimating species trees and species demographics from genetic markers. Practical applications of the multi-species coalescent model are, however, limited by the need to integrate or sample over all gene trees possible for each genetic marker. Here we describe a polynomial-time algorithm that computes the likelihood of a species tree directly from the markers under a finite-sites model of mutation, effectively integrating over all possible gene trees. The method applies to independent (unlinked) biallelic markers such as well-spaced single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and we have implemented it in SNAPP, a Markov chain Monte-Carlo sampler for inferring species trees, divergence dates, and population sizes. We report results from simulation experiments and from an analysis of 1997 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci in 69 individuals sampled from six species of {\em Ourisia} (New Zealand native foxglove).

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  • Fighting network space: It is time for an SQL-type language to filter phylogenetic networks

    Kelk, S; Linz, Simone; Morrison, DA (2013-10-25)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    The search space of rooted phylogenetic trees is vast and a major research focus of recent decades has been the development of algorithms to effectively navigate this space. However this space is tiny when compared with the space of rooted phylogenetic networks, and navigating this enlarged space remains a poorly understood problem. This, and the difficulty of biologically interpreting such networks, obstructs adoption of networks as tools for modelling reticulation. Here, we argue that the superimposition of biologically motivated constraints, via an SQL-style language, can both stimulate use of network software by biologists and potentially significantly prune the search space.

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  • CellML Metadata Framework 2.0

    Cooling, Michael (2011)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    The CellML Metadata 2.0 Framework describes how annotations should be connected to elements within CellML 1.1 model documents. The framework is designed to be modular. It comprises a Core specification (this document), accompanied by one or more satellite specifications. The satellite specifications are each designed to cater for annotation of models for a specific domain or purpose. Examples include the Citation Specification and the Licensing Specification, which cater for adding metadata about citable works, and licenses pertaining to the model, respectively. The modular specification framework allows great flexibility through the addition of satellite specifications for dealing with new domains of interest, and incremental development of annotation pertaining to specific domains.

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  • Translation and Politics - A Bibliography

    Austermuehl, Frank; Roessler, B (2011)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • When relationships at work, work (and don't work!)

    Morrison, RL; Cooper Thomas, Helena; Geertshuis, S (2013-09-08)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In defence of the 'school' in MLES

    Locke, Kirsten (2016-04-20)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    The notion of school as a place of learning that is time-bound and situated in a geographically defined space is challenged by virtual learning spaces that can be accessed anywhere, at any time, on a device that can be carried anywhere. If schools are to prepare our young people for the realities of the hyper-digital context of 21st Century society, the logic goes then that they must be fit for purpose in a way that enables and empowers students to enter into and engage in this digital/societal context.

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  • Knowing Receipt in the Torrens Context.

    Toy, Alan (2006)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    There has long been a tension between indefeasibility and liability in personam. Because liability in personam provides a means for the knowledge of a registered proprietor to be relevant to their liability even in the absence of statutory fraud, this diminishes the principle of indefeasibility. This situation is exacerbated by recent decisions that seek to align recipient liability with the principle of unjust enrichment.

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  • American Political Culture – A Glossary

    Austermuehl, Frank; MacLean, E (2011)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Towards the Making of User Friendly Public Space in China: An Investigation of the Use and Spatial Patterns of Newly Developed Small and Medium-Sized Urban Public Squares in Guangzhou and Shenzhen

    Nguyen, Ngoc Minh (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis investigates how new small and medium-sized public squares are designed and used on a daily basis in Guangzhou and Shenzhen, two major cities in the Pearl River Delta, China. Given an extreme lack of open public space in these cities, these newly developed public space are expected to improve the life of millions of Chinese urban citizens; however, many of them are frequently criticised as inconvenient for users. How to improve the performance of these small and medium-sized public squares is therefore a critical issue faced by the city planners and designers. However, to dates, academic studies of public space in China are primarily focused on the architectural expression of the space or the development of the ‘public sphere’ in China. Hence, information about the actual use of small and medium-sized public squares in China is virtually absent. In order to fill this gap in knowledge on how these new public space are designed and used, this thesis examines 13 small and medium-sized public squares that have been (re)developed over the last 15 years in Guangzhou and Shenzhen using primarily the space syntax methodology, including direct (non-participant) observations and space syntax analysis techniques. The thesis focuses on the examination of three aspects: static occupancy and its relation to actual physical settings, transient use of the space and its relation to urban configuration, and the location preferences by Chinese users and the underlying visual logic. The findings from this thesis document a significantly different way of using public squares in China, as compared to their Western counterparts. Specifically, these spaces are used primarily by the elderly and organised activity groups. This collective way of using public space in China in combination with a wide range of cultural specific activities such as “exercising”, “babysitting”, “playing chess/cards” and “group-singing” has resulted in different spatial use patterns. In particular, this thesis has documented a strong preference for visually exposed locations, with much activity occurring at the centre rather than at the edges of public space, which are the most popular locations in public space in the West. Apart from providing valuable insights about the use and design patterns of small and medium-sized public squares, this research also proposes a number of spatial principles that could provide some guidance for designers and policy makers in the making of more user friendly public space in China in the future. Last but not least, findings of this thesis also hope to stimulate further studies of public space in China, especially those using Space Syntax methods.

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  • Chalkle: The case study of an edtech social enterprise aspiring to transform Adult and Community Education in Aotearoa, New Zealand

    Stewart, Carine (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis examines Chalkle, an edtech social enterprise, through an exploratory case study which offers an in-depth analysis of its operations, policies, procedures, and practices in the period between July 2012 and December 2015. The study of Chalkle explores the company’s aspirations to transform the field of Adult and Community Education (ACE) in Aotearoa, New Zealand. This thesis examines the motivations, challenges, and opportunities presented by Chalkle from the perspective of various stakeholders: learners, teachers, providers, Champions, as well as the organisation’s co-founders. The study of Chalkle offers insights into an alternative model of ACE, which harnessed the power of a technology platform and utilised a social enterprise business model to encourage greater connectivity within the ACE sector. An analysis of Chalkle is important in order to explore and understand how collaboration across and beyond the ACE sector, in this case through a mix of education, technology, and business, could offer insights into sustainable solutions to withstand changes in government policy and funding.

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