6,014 results for Scholarly text

  • Classical Myth and Margaret Mahy's Young Adult Fiction

    Pohl, Michael (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis investigates the importance of classical myth in the young adult fiction of Margaret Mahy. Mahy's novels are full of references to classical myths, both direct and indirect, in names of characters like Dido, Ovid, Ariadne or Hero; in storylines such as Flora's journey to the Underworld-like Viridian to rescue her cousin Anthea, strongly reminiscent of Demeter's rescue of Persephone from Hades, which take their inspiration from classical myth; in seemingly incidental references like the persistent comparisons of Sorry to Charon, the classical ferryman of the dead, in The Changeover. These references point to a deep engagement with the heritage of classical myth. It is an engagement that has not gone unnoticed by scholars of Mahy's work, but it is one that has not enjoyed the dedicated critical attention it deserves. This thesis explores the full importance of classical myth to Mahy's young adult fiction, and shows how an understanding of the classical background of a large selection of Mahy's major novels can both enhance our appreciation of what is already there, as well as open up new avenues for critical engagement with her work.

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  • Margaret Mahy and the Golden Age of Children's Literature

    Proffitt, Catherine (2011)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Margaret Mahy’s novels contain numerous allusions to the classics of Victorian fiction for children. Some of these take the form of passing references; in 24 Hours, for example, protagonist Ellis thinks of himself as “Ellis in Wonderland.” But Mahy also draws on Victorian precedents for some of her settings, taking imaginary islands from Peter and Wendy and Treasure Island, and the secret garden from Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel of the same name. She also invokes the forest of the fairy tales that (although they were not invented by the Victorians) featured so prominently in the reading of Victorian children. To date, little attention has been paid to what might be described as the “Victorian dimension” of Mahy’s work. In what follows, I examine its function in five novels. It emerges that Mahy’s response to the values embodied by her Victorian texts is critical on at least three counts. Mahy’s heroines (or, rather, female heroes) reject the passivity and silence exhibited by fairytale characters such as Jorinda in the Grimms’ ‘Jorinda and Joringel’, and the lack of emotional growth displayed by Lewis Carroll’s Alice. They are also shown in the process of leaving childhood (nostalgically idealized by Carroll, J.M. Barrie and other Victorian authors) behind. Moreover, this thesis exposes the tension between Mahy’s insistent allusion to quintessential fantasy spaces such as Wonderland on one hand, and the distinct anxiety present in her work about the dangerously isolating nature of fantasy on the other. While for Mahy’s teenage protagonists the domestic “real” wins out more often than not over the fantastic but dangerous “true”, the transformative journey of maturation that each undergoes is figuratively sparked by their belief in the Red Queen’s “six impossible things before breakfast”. Perhaps by the same token, they learn that fantasy worlds (like Barrie’s “Neverland”) can be dangerously isolating.

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  • Kia Tomokia Te Kākahu O Te Reo Māori: He whakamahere i ngā kōwhiri reo a te reo rua Māori

    Olsen-Reeder, Vincent Ieni Rubhen Coire (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Kua eke te hunga kōrero Māori ki tōna 150,000 te rahi i te tau 2013 (Statistics New Zealand). Ahakoa tērā, kāore tonu i te kaha kōrerotia te reo Māori. Kei roto i te whakaora i te reo Māori o nāianei, me whakakōrero i te reo Māori, i tua atu i te whakapiki i te rahi e ako ana i te reo Māori. He reo rua katoa te hunga kōrero Māori. Nā reira, kei te āhua o tō tātou reo ruatanga te ora o te reo Māori. Arā, kei tā tātou kōwhiri i te reo Māori tōna kōrerotanga – tōna nui, tōna iti rānei. Nā reira, kei tā tātou kōwhiri i te reo Māori tōna ora. Ko te pātai nui ia, me pēhea te raweke i ngā kōwhiringa reo a te tangata kia reo Māori? Hei whakaea i tēnei pātai, me wānanga anō he aha rā ngā kōwhiringa reo a te reo rua Māori? He pēhea tōna whakamahi i ōna reo? He aha ngā āhuatanga e ārahi ana i aua kōwhiringa? Koinei te aronga o tēnei tohu kairangi, e aro ana ki te reo rua Māori, me āna kōwhiringa reo. Ko tāna e whai nei, kia mārama mai tā te reo rua Māori whakamahi i ōna reo: hei āhea kōrerotia ai te reo Māori, mō āhea kōrerotia ai te reo Pākehā, he aha hoki ngā tini āhuatanga e ārahi ana i ēnei kōwhiringa āna. Mā te whakatutuki i ēnei kaupapa e korowaitia mai ai he mahere e whakamārama ana i ētahi o ngā tino ārai e aukati ana i te kōrero Māori me te kōrero Pākehā, me ētahi āhuatanga e tautoko ana i te kōrerotia o aua reo. Ko tōna kitenga nui, mō te reo rua Māori ko te kaupapa nui katoa i roto i te kōwhiri reo, ko te hua o te reo Māori i roto i te whakawhitinga kōrero. Ko tā tēnei tuhingaroa e takoha atu nei ki te ao rangahau, ko te mahere kōwhiri reo e hangaia ana i runga tonu i ngā wheako o te reo rua Māori. Ko te manako nui, mā te rangahau nei ka hua mai ētahi maramara whakaaro hei āwhina i te reo rua Māori, e reo Māori ai āna mahi, hei hāpai anō i te ora o tēnei reo ō tātou.

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  • Counselling Distance Learners: An Experiment at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand

    Pack, Margaret (1995)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In August 1993, The Open Polytechnic decided to establish a counselling service for it's 30,000 enrolled students. Historically, The Open Polytechnic (previously the Technical Correspondence Institute) had specialised in trades and vocationally based courses, having been developed after the Second World War by the Government of the day to rehabilitate returned servicemen. As students studied by correspondence, it was possible for ex-serviceman to complete vocational qualifications without the disruption of leaving home and work to study.

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  • Mafutaga Samoa

    Unasa, Leilani (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Turquoise water laps the sandy white shore where coconut palms hang lazily over the sea. The sound of a church choir singing a Samoan hymn in the background. A loud phone ring. The entire landscape shakes like crazy. What is this? An earthquake in paradise? Pan out to reveal that the image is cell phone wallpaper. The phone rests on a church pew beside a bible and a Samoan hymnbook. The ring tone is a tinny version of George McCrae's 'Rock Your Baby'. The phone spills out a chorus before a hand frantically locates it and hits the off button ...

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  • Making the Transition to Insulin Therapy: The Experiences of Samoan People with Type 2 Diabetes in New Zealand

    Tapu-Ta'ala, Sera (2011)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Background Pacific people are dying younger compared to other New Zealanders because of complications resulting from uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Good diabetes control is achievable with early use of insulin because of its effectiveness, and proven long term benefits to quality of life. An understanding of how Samoan people with type 2 diabetes make their transition to insulin therapy will assist in understanding how insulin is perceived, which will inform health care professionals in their work with those diagnosed with diabetes. Aim of Research The aim of the research is to explore and describe how Samoan people with type 2 diabetes in New Zealand made the transition to insulin therapy for better glycaemic control. Design The Fonofale Model was used as the theoretical framework, from which to understand Samoan peoples' experiences. This research used a qualitative descriptive methodology. In-depth interviews were used to gather the stories of four Samoan participants over the age of 18 years diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Three major themes emerged from the analysis of the participants' stories. These were: living with diabetes, making the transition to insulin therapy and realisation. The findings led to the creation of the Ia Malu model, which describes the experiences of the participants in this study. Conclusion This study confirmed that there are immense challenges and struggles encountered by people with diabetes. Their adjustment to the illness as well as making the transition to using insulin takes time. As a result of this, it is fundamental for nurses/health care professionals to understand that this is the reality for these people, and they must therefore provide time for people to adjust.

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  • The Implications of Stress and the Effect it has on Māori Who Have Type 2 Diabetes in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Falleni, Patricia Mary (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In this review I will show the connection between diabetes, stress and barriers to care and the impact these have on Māori who have type 2 diabetes. I have undertaken an extensive literature review, which focused mainly on indigenous peoples, and more specifically on Māori. I explored the connection between all the factors involved and combined these with reflections from my own clinical practice experience. My conclusion will show that stress, diet, exercise and barriers to care place a heavy burden on the lives of Māori who live in Aotearoa/New Zealand, suffering from the dis-ease of diabetes. By empowering them to face their situation and see this from a wellness rather than an illness perspective, they can take control of their diabetes and so will live a healthy, longer life, ensuring quality time with their mokopuna/grandchildren.

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  • Rethinking Māori academic development in New Zealand universities

    Hall, Meegan (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Indigenous scholars have called for a rethinking of the cultural interface of Indigenous people within the academy. For Māori academics, their culture often has a significant impact on their work, career goals and academic development requirements, yet the academic development literature is largely silent on the needs of Māori academics. Thus, the views of Māori academics could be better reflected in the scholarship and practice of academic developers. This thesis explores the realities of Māori academic staff in New Zealand universities. It presents a literature review about the experiences and preferences of Māori and other Indigenous academics. It also shares three case studies involving seven participants from two different New Zealand universities. The interviews for the case studies were conducted in accordance with kaupapa Māori methodology and using interpretative phenomenological analysis. In addition, this thesis proposes an integrated framework for conceptualising and delivering culturally relevant academic development to Māori academics. Entitled Te Kōtuinga Mātauranga: A Māori Academic Development Framework, it highlights four dimensions that emerged from the case studies and literature as key to Māori academic development: tuakiritanga (identity), pūkengatanga (skills and knowledge), whanaungatanga (relationships) and tikanga (values and practices). It also reflects the holistic nature of Māori academic work and the demand for individual and collective academic development opportunities. The visual portrayal of the framework draws on the traditional Māori weaving style of tāniko. The woven motif serves as a metaphor for both the interconnectedness of the Māori academic development framework and the importance of understanding academic development from an Indigenous viewpoint. Ultimately, this thesis calls for a rethinking of how academic development can be theorised and delivered to centre the cultural aspirations, preferences and practices of Māori academics, and encourages academic developers to be more inclusive in their practice.

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  • School Staff's Perceptions and Attitudes towards Cyberbullying

    Mattioni, Loreto (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Parallel with the spread of technology use, cyberbullying has become a serious problem in schools, particularly those in developed countries where most young people have ready access to the Internet and mobile phones. Cyberbullying can cause significant emotional harm, disrupt social development, and can be associated with negative student outcomes. As schools must provide students with a safe learning environment, they are challenged with ways to address the phenomenon of cyberbullying. To minimize the negative effects of cyberbullying, and to assist school staff to understand and address this issue, it is necessary to examine the views of school staff on cyberbullying. Positioned within the framework of Social-Ecological Theory, this study explored teachers’ and senior managers’ perceptions and attitudes towards cyberbullying. Data were collected using an anonymous online self-report questionnaire on cyberbullying. One hundred and twelve senior managers and ninety eight teachers, currently working in New Zealand schools, participated in the study. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to evaluate whether groups of items of the questionnaire assessed distinct attitudinal constructs. Results from the exploratory factor analysis indicated that attitudes towards cyberbullying was a multi-dimensional construct composed by three factors (i.e., ‘Concern’, ‘Empathy’ and ‘Responsibility’). The results also showed that most school staff understood what behaviours constitute cyberbullying. However, a significant proportion of school staff were unlikely to identify social exclusion as being a component of cyberbullying. School staff perceived cyberbullying as conducted mainly by girls and by students across all age groups. In addition, school staff were concerned about cyberbullying, they were empathetic towards cybervictims and they believed that cyberbullies could be helped. However, school staff, especially senior managers, were unlikely to perceive cyberbullying as a problem in their schools and likely to report low frequencies of cyberbullying. Moreover, school staff felt only moderately responsible for preventing cyberbullying as it commonly occurs outside the school. Theoretical and applied implications, for the different levels of the Social-Ecological Theory that affect cyberbullying behaviours, are discussed.

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  • "All We Got to See Were Factories.": Scoping Maori Transitions from Secondary School

    Mitchell, Moana Erika (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The primary purpose of this research is to scope the reflexive journey of a selected group of Maori as they recall their experiences of secondary school transitions. The already complex nature of this transition from school is further exacerbated by the identification of these people as Maori. The treatment of Maori students, particularly in relation to their secondary school experiences and its impact on transition, is a major concern for this research. The research methodology privileged by my thesis is kaupapa Maori theory. Secondary school transitions for rangatahi Maori is tenuous. By framing this thesis within kaupapa Maori methodology, the intention is to recognise the impact of dominant ideology on the schooling experiences of Maori and how it ultimately determines school transitions. This scoping study is based on the interviews of research participants as they reflect on their experiences as rangatahi Maori transitioning from school. In particular, these interviews highlight how rangatahi Maori work through the complexities they are confronted with whilst in the transitory phase between completion of secondary schooling and post-school opportunities. Information gathered from the interviews constitutes the findings of this thesis. The findings reveal that schooling experiences and more specifically, treatment of Maori students by teachers, play a significant role in transitioning for young Maori. Negotiating the already complex pathway out of school is doubly problematic for rangatahi Maori who also have to come to terms with a culture of failure, perpetuated at secondary school and reinforced by out of school experiences. This research contends that marginalisation of rangatahi Maori in New Zealand secondary schools creates an alternate experience, whereby actions of resistance and agency are employed as they look to position themselves into post-school opportunities. Of significance, is the human quality of determination that allows rangatahi Maori to stand firm, despite the entrenchment of low self-confidence and motivation through indifferent school and transition systems. Such pathways create choice for rangatahi Maori due to a lack of support from these systems, not because of it.

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  • Cultural Representation of New Zealand's Landscapes in the Films of The Lord of the Rings and its Implications for Tourism

    Carl, Daniela (2004)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Filmic images influence how we see the world and filmic tourists visit places to experience the image they have seen on the screen. New Zealand is an example of a destination that has embraced the relationship between film and tourism. Through its box-office success and the associated tourist promotions, The Lord of the Rings (TLotR) film trilogy has exposed New Zealand's landscapes to a global audience of potential travellers. This study analyses the landscape portrayal in the first and second film of TLotR and filmic tourists' experiences of these landscapes. As with many other film tourism destinations, the screen locations are a mix of real landscapes, film sets, and digital enhancements. Thus, the tourist will not necessarily be able to experience the landscapes of the films. This results in implications regarding the sustainability of film tourism and tourism management. The study employed an overall interpretive approach to analyse the landscape portrayal in the films and filmic tourists' experiences. Triangulation was used to reveal iconic landscapes of the films. Empirical research was undertaken with three tourism operators offering TLotR themed products: a half-day tour of the Hobbiton location in Matamata, a half-day jeep safari tour around Queenstown, and a multi-day tour of 'New Zealand as Middle-earth' for TLotR enthusiasts. Filmic tourists' experiences of former TLotR film sites are explored in these case studies. The cultural landscapes portrayed in the films are a combination of actors' performances, narratives in the plot, film sets and digitally generated images. New Zealand's landscapes were used as geography, metaphor and spectacle as part of the narrative. This study determined that Hobbiton, Rivendell and Edoras were the three main iconic landscapes of the films. The findings show that the more perfect the representation of hyper-reality in the tours, the higher the satisfaction and the more enhanced the tourist experience. Filmic tourists desire to step into the film set and to be part of the film when re-enacting film scenes. In addition, guides integrate stories about the challenge of filmmaking or behind-the-scenes' anecdotes, which served to enhance the fascination and 'authenticity' of the experience. There is still a need for more information and support to ensure high quality interpretation and guiding given the importance of these aspects in mediating tourist experience and informing resultant levels of satisfaction. By better understanding how filmic tourists experience these cultural landscapes, tourism operators and destination marketers can better meet expectations, thereby expanding the beneficial effects of film tourism on destinations.

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  • Classical Epic in the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien

    Parry, Hannah (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The Lord of the Rings has often been described as an 'epic', and although Tolkien drew most famously on Northern mythology in his creation of Middle-earth much of his work also bears similarities to classical epic, both with regard to particular characters and archetypes and to more general themes and motifs. This thesis examines the connections between The Lord of the Rings and the epics of Homer and Virgil, investigating the manner in which these allusions function in Tolkien and how they contribute to our understanding of Middleearth as at least partially an epic world with epic ideals of heroism. At the same time, however, it identifies the ways in which Tolkien changes or subverts such classical ideals and archetypes as they combine with other cultural influences. Following the model established in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings begins with the folk-tale heroes and setting of the Shire before gradually moving into an epic world. Not only heroes such as Aragorn, but less obviously epic heroes such as Gandalf, Frodo and Sam, draw frequently on the iconography and motifs associated with specific and general classical figures, while women such as Arwen, Eowyn and Galadriel can similarly be read as part of classical tradition. Moreover, despite the purely fictional nature of Middle-earth in contrast to the historical (if mythologised) cultures of classical epic, The Lord of the Rings contains many examples of epic type-scenes that in classical epic illustrate the correct manner in which a hero should behave both in peace and in battle. The Lord of the Rings' relationship to epic is complex, however, not only employing these heroic and epic conventions but also subverting or superseding them as Tolkien engages with the problems of classical motifs within a very different universe. The heroes and heroines of The Lord of the Rings must navigate codes of behaviour both classical and non-classical, and willingly relinquish those out of place in the new age being born around them. This tension between old and new codes of behaviour is made more explicit during the book's twin 'returns', that of Aragorn to Minas Tirith and the hobbits to the Shire. Although these continue to draw extensively on classical predecessors, most notably Aeneas' prophesised arrival in Latium and Odysseus' famous homecoming, these predecessors are also superseded as Middle-earth moves into the Fourth Age. While The Hobbit moves from folk tale to epic and back again, The Lord of the Rings moves from folk-tale to epic to somewhere “beyond the epic” (Flieger 145), and as the book draws to its elegiac conclusion pure classical values become increasingly supplanted by the book’s own heroic code, influenced by many heroic traditions and overwhelmingly by Tolkien's Catholic beliefs. In the end, The Lord of the Rings can perhaps be read as an epic about the passing of epic, and thus an epic for the modern world.

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  • Bullying Behaviour in Schools: Towards Better Understandings and Practice

    Cleary, Mark (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study of school bullying provides an overview of the development of international anti-bullying initiatives, an in-depth analysis of the state of antibullying approaches in New Zealand and a description of the impact of such approaches on the behaviour in one secondary school community. Its findings endorse the use of effective, school-based, anti-bullying interventions, in particular, those developed in Scandinavia and Britain during the last twenty years. The efforts to combat bullying in New Zealand are reviewed. While some New Zealand programmes are found to be effective, the anti-bullying initiatives of the Ministry of Education and the Education Review Office are found wanting, as is their failure to respond effectively to the growing public concern over bullying. A number of anti-bullying interventions undertaken within one school community are evaluated. While generally found to reduce bullying, the limitations of these interventions became evident when one class group was viewed in greater depth in a study which discovered an entrenched bullying ‘culture’ and provided insights into the bullying dynamic. The communication difficulties experienced when a small number of powerful individuals capture the dynamics of power and abuse, and in effect establish the relationship style for the whole group, are then highlighted. As a result of the understandings gained through this classroom-based study, a number of conclusions are developed about the importance of the role played by leaders, both teacher and pupil.

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  • Beaches in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Butler, Edward R T (2001)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Modern beaches in McMurdo Sound can be divided into 3 process regimes. Beaches on Ross Island (eastern McMurdo Sound) are characterised by marine processes with little ice modification. On ice-bound western McMurdo Sound, coastal orientation is of paramount importance. Ice thrust features are prominent on south facing beaches, which are open to the predominant wind direction and receive relatively small waves from the fetch restricted south. A greater degree of marine dominance is exhibited by beaches on north facing coasts where sea ice is blown offshore and the beaches are open to the larger storm waves from the eastern Ross Sea. The single most useful indicator of the relative importance of marine and ice processes on the beaches is the roundness of the beach material. Unlike the modern beaches, raised beach ridges at all sites comprise poorly sorted cobbles in a mixed sand and gravel matrix. These are inferred to be storm ridges. In contrast with the raised beaches, the modern beaches on the western side of the Sound have evidence of ice processes on them. This suggests that the modem beach has not experienced the same magnitude storms that produced the raised beaches. The size and frequency of the ridges is a product of the local wave climate. The number of raised beaches at any site is a useful indicator of the paleo-wave climate. More ridges occur in sheltered south facing locations, because they are more protected from open marine conditions, than on beaches in ice-free or north facing locations. When determining the marine limit of a site the most useful features are, low energy marine bedding features (such as flaser bedding) and boulder pavements. Based on inferred process information at the time of deposition, revised estimates of marine limits in McMurdo Sound and a new marine limit at Cape Barne are presented. Because the nature of the raised beaches has not been fully considered by previous authors sea level curves are inaccurate. The reconstruction of the retreat of the Ross Ice Shelf from marine limits in McMurdo Sound shows a three stage stepwise southward retreat of the Ross Ice Shelf. A breakout from somewhere north of Cape Roberts and south of Cape Ross back to Marble Point (on the western side of the Sound) while remaining north of Cape Bird (on the eastern side of the Sound), occurred sometime around 8,000 years ago. Another breakout cleared ice from Cape Bird to somewhere south of Cape Barne and south of Cape Bernacchi around 5,000 years ago. This differs with other authors work (Hall and Denton, 1999, Kellogg et al., 1996, Stuiver et al., 1981) by suggesting a considerably older date for the Ross Ice Sheet retreating from McMurdo Sound. The data presented here suggests that much of McMurdo Sound was ice free about 1,500 years before earlier estimates at about 6,500 years. The effect of the change in deglaciation timing is to reduce isostatic rebound rates. This suggests that there was less ice in McMurdo Sound during the Last Glacial Maximum.

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  • The compromise of conscience: Conscientious objection in healthcare

    Newman, Louise (2013)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper discusses a medical practitioner’s right to conscientiously object to providing a legally available healthcare service in New Zealand, on the grounds of their personal beliefs. Currently, the right to conscientiously object is enshrined in the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003 and the Contraception, Sterilisation and Abortion Act. This paper argues the current legislative arrangement regulating a health practitioner’s right to conscientiously object under New Zealand law is vague, and risks cementing uncertainty, due to scope of the protection being unclear. In addition, the current protection risks patient safety, as it does not exclude the right to conscientiously object in medical emergencies, or when the efficacy of the treatment is time dependent. To remedy this unsatisfactory situation, it is recommended that the right to conscientiously object in healthcare be rendered impermissible in the aforementioned scenarios. It is further recommended that direct referral to a non-objecting colleague be mandatory in the event a practitioner wishes to exercise their right to conscientiously object. This is because access to healthcare may be compromised by a practitioner exercising the right to conscientiously object, with no corresponding direct referral requirement, a risk borne by patients.

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  • Analysis of New Zealand Specific Electric Vehicle Adoption Barriers and Government Policy

    Zhu, Jiayi (Jason) (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The New Zealand (NZ) Transport sector represents over 40% of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector. Electric Vehicles (EV) are fast emerging globally as a viable alternative to traditional fossil fuel burning cars. In hope of addressing the low EV adoption in NZ, the Ministry of Transport published a series of EV policies in May 2016. The literature review found a broad spectrum of EV adoption barriers from a global perspective covering technology, economic, social, environmental, and political factors. However, the analysis of barriers from a NZ perspective is overly simplistic and largely based on international findings with little empirical evidence specific to NZ. The most influential barriers specific to NZ are deemed as 1) range; 2) charging time; 3) purchase price; 4) charging facilities and 5) NZ car market. While there is literature which evaluates global policies and suggests effective policies for NZ, there is no current research that evaluates whether the latest NZ government policy is going to be effective in improving EV uptake in NZ. These papers tend to prescribe a solution of government policies without truly knowing whether their assumptions about EV adoption barriers apply to NZ. Using a mixed methodology, a questionnaire containing both quantitative and qualitative research questions was carried out. The findings of this paper show there are four major NZ specific barriers, namely 1) high purchase price; 2) unknown cost of ownership (i.e. service, maintenance and repair); 3) lack of charging facilities and 4) lack of EV knowledge. Other barriers highlighted by literature such as range and charging time are found to be less influential barriers. Overall, the sentiment for EV adoption is positive and the government policy is deemed to be reasonably effective as it either directly or indirectly addresses the above four barriers; however, certain policies such as ones addressing the cost of ownership can be improved.

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  • Forecasting the Term Structure of Implied Volatilities

    Guo, Biao; Han, Qian; Lin, Hai (2015)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Neumann and Skiadopoulos (2013) document that although the implied volatilities are predictable, their economic pro ts become insignificant once the cost is accounted for. We show that the trading strategies based on the predictability of implied volatilities could generate significant risk-adjusted returns after controlling for the transaction cost. The implied volatility curve information is useful for the out-of-sample forecast of implied volatilities up to one week. Short-maturity implied volatilities tend to be more predictable than long-maturity implied volatilities. Although the long-maturity options are much less traded than the short-maturity options, their implied volatilities provide much more information on the price discovery.

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  • The Wellington urban motorway : the parts played by the planning authorities and the Bolton Street Preservation Society

    Miller, Richard Ogilvy (1969)

    Bachelor of Arts thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The inadequacy of our present planning system to accomodate at the critical stage participation of interested citizens in the control of their environment. A case history showing how the negotiations between the various authorities and the Bolton Street Cemetery Preservation Society, the route of the motorway, concerning demonstrates the truth or otherwise of the hypothesis.

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  • Crippling the Will of a People: Morphostatic Structures of Violence and the Crawl-Space of Agency in the Lives of Eritrean Refugees

    Commerer, Jared (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In conjunction with an exposition of the larger historical and political context of the nation of Eritrea, this thesis examines the life narratives of five refugees hailing from the Horn of Africa. In doing so, certain institutional, relational, and embodied forms of violence are identified as permeating Eritrea’s socio-political fabric and thus also the inter- and intra-personal lives of the participants. Where morphostatic structures are deemed as those that constrain an individual’s capacity to pursue their ultimate concerns, it is maintained that violence in the form of extreme nationalism, routinised fear, and varying subjective affects partially accounts for the fact that an estimated 5,000 people are fleeing this small, modernising African nation every month. Following this, I argue that, by examining the life-narratives of Eritrean refugees, violence can be understood as transpiring at the interstices of an ongoing – albeit skewed – dialectic between, on one hand, morphostatic structures of violence appearing in institutional, relational, and embodied forms, and, on the other, a degree of mimetic agency that, when harnessed, acts as a crawl-space through which individuals – if they are to realise their ultimate concerns – must absent themselves relative to such structures of violence.

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  • Customer-led versus market-oriented: An investigation of the lean startup methodology framework

    Jimale, Ismail Mohamed (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Market-oriented approach to customer development has been strongly associated innovativeness and new product success. There is also evidence to suggest customer-led approach, or responding to explicit customer needs, impedes innovation. This thesis investigates whether the increasingly popular Lean Startup Methodology (LSM) favours customer-led or market-oriented approach to discovering and learning about customer needs. The study was conducted using a participatory action research methodology. The LSM was used as a framework for investigating the commercial value of two researched projects originating from within Victoria University. The LSM was also applied to a third project founded by the Master of Advanced Technology Enterprise (MATE) team. The LSM process is shown to assist in the discovery of both explicit and latent customer needs. However, which one the framework favours depends on whether the product or the market is the primary driver of the validation process. In one instance the entrepreneur is deliberately looking to discover a present market need in order to align it with a pre-defined solution, while the alternative is to study the market in order to identify an opportunity followed by the development of a specific solution. The latter is shown to support becoming market oriented. The findings also suggest Domain Knowledge plays a vital role in establishing and maintaining market-oriented approach to customer development. Domain knowledge aids in understanding market data in order to extract novel and meaningful insights. Establishing close relationships with emerging customers and „lead users‟ in a particular market is shown to be an effective method of compensating for a lack of domain knowledge. What‟s more, the presence of preconceived prototypes is shown to negatively impact on the entrepreneur‟s ability to approach customer development in a market-oriented manner. By drawing on the MATE team‟s experiences, this thesis aims to provide practical lessons for individuals and teams that are looking to take a market-oriented approach to customer development.

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