6,164 results for Scholarly text

  • Calendar 1963

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1963)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1962

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1962)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • E Toe Sasa'a Le Fafao; Return to Paradise

    Feaunati, Carinnya (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Following the devastating tsunami of 2009 in Samoa many villages on the south coast of the main island Upolu were left in ruins, one such site is the heritage rich village of Sa’anapu. Five years on, the coastal front village is still in a state of ruin and the imminent risk of future tsunami have seen the relocation of families inland; away from the sea, the resourceful mangrove and their historically significant Fale Tele that once housed their ancestors. Many families who have rebuilt inland have inevitably abandoned their traditionally constructed homes on the beach front and opted for western influenced dwellings. This is due to high costs, traditional skill shortage and an underlying notion of the western influence that impedes small pacific island nations today. Although the increasing foreign aid being injected into the country for community development is a positive move to rebuilding villages they bring a western architectural typology. With this comes an alarming decline in the traditional Samoan craft of construction, spatial constructs and ultimately the desire of the youth to retain their built heritage. This design research argues that the rebuild process in devastated villages after a natural disaster presents a design opportunity to retain cultural practices in particular for a community in a heritage rich village. It also argues that culturally adapted and environmentally considerate design is vital in re-invigorating a displaced community but also encourages future sustainable development- culturally, economically and environmentally. The research tests a multi-disciplinary framework of environmental science and anthropology to inform the architecture of a hybrid master-guild carpentry and tattooing school. The scientific approach seeks to mitigate the risks and vulnerability of the site in relation to the natural environment whereas the anthropological approach has been the direct involvement of the Sa’anapu people through a sharing of knowledge, stories and aspirations for the future their village.

    View record details
  • The Flipping Sequence Of A Very Tall Structure

    Aznam, Moehammad Zaed (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The impact of rising sea levels and perennial flooding in cities and low-lying urban areas is becoming more severe with the increasing threat of global warming. Unfortunately, in many parts of the world, these low-lying areas are among the poorest and most densely populated areas. They are often inhabited by the urban poor, with limited means and resources to survive devastating floods. Imagine, in the event of extreme catastrophic flooding in the future, how will these communities survive and continue to thrive? This thesis looks at one such site, Kampong Muara Baru, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Due to its low-lying coastal location, Kampong Muara Baru is slowly losing the battle to the increasing threat posed by flooding. The aging infrastructure currently in place, such as the water gate, flood pump, and embankments, are no longer able to cope with the increasing pressure. It is predicted that Kampong Muara Baru will eventually become submerged, as sea levels continue to rise. The design proposes a thought-provoking, autonomous Neo-Futurist intervention for a future kampong, based on the concepts of Ecotopia (Ernest Callenbach) and Micro-Utopia (John Wood). It is presented as a sci-fi graphic novel to convey the dystopian narrative of the proposal. This thesis proposes that a kampong community under threat from catastrophic flooding can survive and thrive with an adaptable architectural intervention that can protect, shelter and support the community during and after such a disastrous event. By exaggerating the current situation, it is envisioned – hypothetically – that after several disastrous floods, a catastrophic flooding event will eventually wipe Kampong Muara Baru off the map. The repeated floods leading up to this event have already served as a warning to the people to prepare themselves for the ultimate inundation. A blueprint design of a ‘floating house’ was devised and constructed by the community from the recycled components of urban infrastructure. The process of developing and perfecting the floating house will take several decades where each generation will add onto the design, in order to perfect it according to the blueprint. Eventually, when the final catastrophic flood hits, threatening to wipe out the Kampong forever, the community will already be well prepared to face the disaster. These floating houses will allow the community to regroup and re-create their village in the new dystopian environment.

    View record details
  • Channelisation of Noise through a Rhythmic Gird: Brutalist Mechatronic Sound-sculpture

    Zareei, Mo (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The aim of this thesis is to provide accessibility and appreciation for sounds that are conventionally perceived as non-musical or “noise”. Ordering the noise on a grid of metric rhythms, and underlining its materiality through an audiovisual mode of expression are the two main strategies employed. Using the medium of mechatronics, mechanically generated sonic by-products of technological developments are chosen as the focus sonic material. As a result, the output of this research extends what is known as glitch music outside the territory of amplified sound, to a realm where noise is created physically and acoustically. Based on these objectives, and following an investigation on the use of mechatronics in contemporary sound-based art, an ensemble of mechatronic sound-sculptures is designed and developed. Varying in terms of material, sound-generating mechanism, and sonic quality, the ensemble is divided into three different instrument-types, each of which is introduced, thoroughly described, and sonically evaluated. Next, three new audiovisual works are developed and realised utilising the mechatronic sound-sculptures, in order to turn into practice the ideas explored in this research. These compositions – which are all exhibited in competitive international symposiums – undertake the integration of mechatronics in three areas of sonic arts that are interconnected with the sound-sculptures. Furthermore, this thesis also establishes an aesthetic framework that formalises a significant body of contemporary sound art and music that, prior to this work, had suffered academic inattention. Probing the various parallels between the ideas developed in this thesis and Brutalist architecture, ‘sound-based brutalism’ is coined and formulated as an aesthetic underpinning for not only the academically marginalised works discussed, but also the work of the author. Lastly, two audiovisual projects (a performance and a series of ten installation pieces) are developed using the entire mechatronic sound-sculpture series in an effort to realise ‘sound-based brutalism’.

    View record details
  • Calendar 1988

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1988)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Surface and shear-wave velocity modelling of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, New Zealand, using ambient noise cross-correlation

    Godfrey, Holly Joanne (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    We use continuous seismic data from permanent and temporary, broadband and short-period stations that were operating during 2001 and 2008 to investigate the subsurface velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre (TgVC) of New Zealand, particularly the highly active but poorly understood Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. Stacks of cross-correlation of two concurrent ambient noise seismograms can be used to estimate the interstation Green's Function, i.e., the impulse response of the earth between the two receivers. The Green's Functions are used to retrieve the dispersion relation (frequency-dependent velocity) of surface waves at different periods, which reflects the shear-wave velocity structure in the Fresnel volume of the propagating surface waves. Several studies have used dispersion measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations to investigate the shallow subsurface shear-wave velocity structure of active volcanoes around the world. Most use vertical components to retrieve the Rayleigh waves, but it is becoming increasingly common to use the horizontal seismogram components in addition to the vertical, giving further constraints to Rayleigh-wave measurements and introducing data relating to Love waves. We compute 1,048,968 daily cross-correlations for 955 viable station pairs across the two periods, including all nine-components of the cross-correlation tensor where possible. These daily functions are then stacked into 7458 full-stacks, of which we make group velocity dispersion measurements for 2641 RR-, RZ-, TT-, ZR- and ZZ-component stacks. Cross-correlation quality varies across the networks, with some station pairs possibly contaminated with timing errors. We observe both the fundamental and rst higher-order modes within our database of dispersion measurements. However, correctly identifying the mode of some measurements is challenging as the range of group velocities measured reflects both presence of multiple modes and heterogeneity of the local velocity structure. We assign modes to over 1900 measurements, of which we consider 1373 to be high quality. We invert fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves independently and jointly for one dimensional shear-wave velocity profiles at Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes, using dispersion measurements from two individual station pairs and average dispersion curves from measurements within specifi c areas on/around the volcanoes. Our Ruapehu profiles show little velocity variation with depth, suggesting that volcanic edifice is made of material that is compacting and being hydrothermally altered with depth. At Tongariro, we observe larger increases in velocity with depth, which we interpret as different layers within Tongariro's volcanic system. Slow shear-wave velocities, on the order of 1-2 km/s, are consistent with both P-wave velocities from existing velocity pro files of areas within the TgVC, and the observations of worldwide studies of shallow volcanic systems that used ambient noise cross-correlation. A persistent observation across the majority of our dispersion measurements is that group velocities of the fundamental mode Love-wave group velocity measurements are slower than those of fundamental mode Rayleigh-waves, particularly in the frequency range of 0.25-1 Hz. Similarly, first higher-order mode Love-wave group velocities are slower than first higher-mode Rayleigh-wave velocities. This is inconsistent with the differences between synthetic dispersion curves that were calculated using isotropic, layered velocity models appropriate for Ruapehu and Tongariro. We think the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy is due to structures such as dykes or cracks in the vertical plane having greater influence than horizontal layering on surface-wave propagation. However, several measurements where Love-wave group velocities are faster than Rayleigh-wave group velocities suggests that in some places horizontal layering is the stronger influence. We also observe that the differences between the Love- and Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves vary with the azimuth of the interstation path across Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. Some significant differences between Rayleigh-wave velocities of measurements with different interstation orientations are also observed, as are differences between Love-wave velocities. This suggests a component of azimuthal anisotropy within the volcanic structures, which coupled with the radial anistropy makes the shear-wave velocity structures of Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes anisotropic with orthorhombic symmetry. We suggest that further work to determine three-dimensional structure should include provisions for anisotropy with orthorhombic or lower symmetry.

    View record details
  • Improved earthquake detection as a probe for active fault structures in New Zealand's central Southern Alps

    Chamberlain, Calum (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis concerns the detection and analysis of micro-seismicity and low-frequency earthquakes in New Zealand's central Southern Alps. We make use of the 6.5 year continuous seismic dataset collected using the Southern Alps Microearthquake Borehole Array (SAMBA), alongside other temporary and permanent seismic deployments nearby. The small station spacing of this deployment allows for high resolution seismic studies near the Alpine Fault, a dextral-transpressive plate boundary fault between the Pacific and Australian plates. Using this dataset we have documented the rst evidence of low-frequency earthquakes on or near the deep extent of the Alpine Fault. By using a network based crosscorrelation detection method we have generated a 3 year catalogue of 14 low-frequency earthquake families. These low-frequency earthquake families locate close to other indicators and models of the deep extent of the Alpine Fault, and we interpret these low-frequency earthquakes to represent shear failure on or near the deep extent of the Alpine Fault. These low-frequency earthquakes highlight a near-continuous background rate of deformation, punctuated by short periods of tremor. We also observe higher rates of low-frequency earthquake generation after large regional earthquakes. The magnitudes of our low-frequency earthquakes range from Mʟ‒0.8‒1.8, and appear to follow an exponential distribution, implying that there might be a characteristic length-scale of failure. We have extended the catalogue of low-frequency earthquake templates using the full 6.5 year dataset and an objective synthetic detection methodology. We developed a new methodology for template detection after other methods failed, or were not feasible. This method employs simple synthetic template events, which, rather than trying to capture all of the complexities of the body waves we try to detect, approximate a simple waveform that does not correlate well with background noise. To undertake this method we have developed a multi-parallel Python package, which is highly portable (we have run this on computers ranging from dual-core, 8GB RAM laptops to a 393 node, 6349 CPU cluster computer) and distributed via an open-source model. This package was run through the 6.5 year dataset on the New Zealand E-Science PAN cluster to e fficiently (s major strike-slip plate boundaries, both at depth, and at the upper extent of the seismogenic zone.

    View record details
  • Forgotten Integration: An investigation into the integration of Post-Olympic Parks

    Warren, Marcus (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The Summer Olympics occur every four years, capturing the hearts of the world for a nite period of time. During this time, the eyes of the world are set on the host city of whom provide a facility and an infrastructure to accommodate not only the athletes, but the millions of spectators that attend the events and the memorable moments that ensue. While the Summer Olympics and it’s park are focused heavily upon during the games, integration of the site into the host city has become largely forgotten post-Olympics. Ultimately, these once vast locations have now become deserted and dystopia environments within the host city. This thesis addresses the problem of integrating Olympic parks back into the context of the host city by enabling new and diverse spaces. The work of Charles Waldheim, Rem Koolhaas, Alex Wall, Tricia Cusack and Dennis Saunders are employed over five main ideas: wetland urbanism, urban grid, edge extension, fragmented distribution and landscape occupation. Strategic integration of post-Olympic Sites into the existing host city can arguably be done so by creating a multi-programmatic system that adapts and transforms to respond to the dynamic needs of both the Olympic Site and the local urban context of the surrounding city. This thesis considers the task of integrating the Sydney Olympic Park back into Sydney’s context, transforming its current form into a state of integration with the host city that is successful. The thesis produces a design, based on five key design principles which have been created through conclusions of research: wetlands, extension, grid, distribution and occupation.

    View record details
  • Lithospheric deformation in the Southern Lakes, New Zealand

    Warren-Smith, Emily (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Geological and geophysical data from the Southern Lakes region, South Island, New Zealand, are utilised in this thesis to examine active and Cenozoic deformation between the Australian and Pacific plates. Using published seismic and gravity data, the volume of the crustal root beneath the Southern Alps is estimated and combined with constraints on Cenozoic exhumation to form a simple 2D model of crustal shortening. This approach shows that the volume of crust (plus eroded material) requires up to three times the Cenozoic plate boundary orthogonal motion as constrained by plate reconstructions. Crustal thickening in the Southern Alps must therefore be contributed to by a significant amount of along-strike motion. It is proposed that this motion is accommodated by a low-angle mid-crustal detachment between an underthrust Australian plate hyper-extended rift margin and the overlying Pacific plate. Quantification of Cenozoic deformation is approached using apatite and zircon fission-track thermochronology. Previous fission-track studies in the Southern Lakes have been hindered by extremely low uranium concentrations (40 km from the fault. This deepening of seismicity approximates the mid-crustal detachment constrained by thermo-kinematic modelling. Focal mechanisms for 154 events (0.1<5.2) are generated and interpreted in the context of a uniform stress field to produce an estimate of SHmax=114°. This orientation is inconsistent with the principal contraction direction derived from GPS (095°) and gravitational based calculations. Instead, the dip directions of all nodal planes indicate that slip may be occurring subparallel to the plate convergence direction (c. 070°) on a limited set of linked fractures, organised into strike-slip and thrust segments. This same segmentation is observed along the central Alpine Fault trace, which is partitioned into strike-slip and thrust segments at a 1—10 km scale. Earthquake slip directions may therefore be kinematically controlled, accommodating the plate convergence, and SHmax may be biased by this relationship, simply approximating the P-axis of the dominant faulting style. By considering the 4th May 2015 ML6.0 Wanaka earthquake, it is shown that the same kinematic process also controls large magnitude events. The mainshock and 99 aftershock waveforms are used as template events to perform matched-filter cross-correlation detection of further aftershocks. This method detects 2544 aftershocks over 26 days, 27 times more than recorded by the national network. By generating lagged single channel cross-correlation derived phase picks, precise double-difference locations of these detected aftershocks are computed. Hypocentres highlight a steeply northwest dipping (c. 70°) fault striking at c. 250°, which aligns well with the dextral plane of the mainshock focal mechanism and the plate convergence direction. Analysis of aftershock slip vectors reveals secondary slip occurred on synthetic Riedel shears oriented c. 20° from the principal slip plane. This thesis contributes a new fission-track age calculation method, 41 new fission-track ages, thermo-kinematic models and two detailed microseismic catalogues for an important transitional section of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone. These data are interpreted in the context of a new tectonic model for the region, involving a large component of dextral unthrusting to explain the crustal and lithospheric roots.

    View record details
  • Leaving a Trail - Revealing heritage in a rural landscape

    Rodgers, Maria (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    ‘Leaving a Trail – revealing heritage in a rural landscape’ investigates how landscape architecture can reveal heritage and connect Māori and Pākehā to the land and to the past in rural Aotearoa New Zealand. Our rural landscapes contain rich and varied stories, which, if interpreted and made stronger by being linked together, have the potential to create cultural and recreational assets as well as tourist drawcards. A starting point for this research based in South Wairarapa was the six sites identified by the Wairarapa Moana Management Team as sites for development. The first design ‘hunch’ remained the touchstone of the project. With the six Wairarapa Moana Wetlands Park sites forming an ‘inner necklace’ the aim of this project became creating an ‘outer necklace’ of revealed heritage sites, a heritage trail. This thesis was inspired by the depth of Māori connection to the land. Māori consider the natural world is able to ‘speak’ to humans. The method chosen for this design research is based on landscape architect Christophe Girot’s ‘Four Trace Concepts in Landscape Architecture’. Girot is interested in methods and techniques that expand landscape projects beyond the amelioration of sites towards the reactivation of the cultural dimensions of sites. As part of this research is to enable connection with the cultural dimensions of sites, or to ‘hear the site speak’, his method was chosen as a starting point. It was adapted and shaped by previous experience and the experience of this research to form a new method, ‘Four Listening Acts in Landscape Architecture’. Through such methods landscape architects can grow their relationship with the land and so better design with the land and for the landscape and its people. After research, the sites were chosen and grouped into four major routes, Māori, Pākehā settlement, natural system and military, so as to appeal to people with a variety of interests. Of the twenty six trail sites most are already marked and eleven are unmarked. Research into how to reveal these unmarked sites saw three different approaches used. Sites with spaces had their essence intensified to become places. Other sites had objects designed for them directly related to the landscape. The significance of the rest is shown with numbered markers. These three different methods of revealing a site’s significance are threaded together into a series, a necklace, creating a trail that contributes a cultural, recreational and tourist resource to South Wairarapa.

    View record details
  • Smart Tray: Speculating The Future New Zealand Dining Experience

    Levy, Joe (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research proposes a design solution that embraces New Zealander’s proclivity for pervasive digital technology and that aims to meet the needs and desires of the future Kiwi dining experience. This research proposition is directed by an approach that situates itself between future forecasting and speculative design, whereby the design output is viable while simultaneously capable of provoking critical reflection about the future of design as it relates to domestic dining appliances. The development of a design solution, the Smart Tray, encapsulates these aims and has been guided by a comprehensive investigation into the points of connection that exist between culture, technology, design and social behaviour. The Smart Tray seeks to acknowledge New Zealand’s history while embodying its contemporary domestic dining culture in proposing an appliance-device that embraces digital technology as part of the everyday dining experience. This research has been supported by the application of various methodologies inclusive of the critical review of academic literature that has functioned to frame and support the scope of the research proposition; case studies in which a selection of Kiwi households have been interviewed, observed, and their behaviours analysed in order to gain a greater understanding of contemporary dining habits and their relationship with pervasive digital technologies at home; and iterative design development inclusive of concept sketching, sketch modelling, experience prototyping, and user feedback. Although this research is contextualised within New Zealand, the general research outcomes are applicable to a wide market. The outputs produced as a result of this research, including the exegesis and design of the final Smart Tray, are intended to offer a valuable critical perspective and viable future design solution that will aid in furthering the professional field of dining design.

    View record details
  • Renewal of the Abject; Manure-facturing in the Horowhenua District

    Rofe, Rebecca (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Two prominent issues are affecting the vitality of regional settlements in the New Zealand context. Firstly, urbanisation has meant the migration of young workers and professionals to creative and economic urban centres, leaving demographic gaps in the regions and a dwindling population. Secondly, the exploitation of regional landscapes by cities has led to severe degradation of extensive wetland ecosystems. Wetlands drained for farming, large-scale deforestation and industrial settlements established to support agriculture and forestry contribute to the artificial landscape morphology. New Zealand’s waterways and lakes now suffer from eutrophication; an enrichment of nutrients caused by dairy run-off and increased sediments, characterised by a build-up of organic matter producing toxic algae bloom. Titled ‘Renewal of the Abject’, this project is a speculative design that aims to reconcile the problematic relationship between the dairy industry and the environment. Architectural infrastructure and landscape renewal present an opportunity to challenge current urban planning tendencies in the Horowhenua District. The project proposes to reinvigorate small towns with a self-sufficient and forward planning urban framework. Levin, a prominent industrial town at the centre of the Horowhenua District, clings to the vital transport connection between Wellington and Auckland, feeding off the economic lifeline of passing traffic. With the proposed changes by NZTA to create a State Highway One Bypass east of Levin, the CBD may suffer economically leading to population decline. Lake Horowhenua, west of the town centre, was once the heart of the District with an abundance of food and natural resources. It is now considered one of the worst lakes in New Zealand based on its poor condition. Integrating infrastructure and megastructure challenges modernist attempts to zone cities by function and aims to build clean infrastructure integrated into compact urban areas. Architecture as infrastructure challenges the public understanding of production and manufacturing and their natural consequences. A redefinition of industry for the twenty-first century could improve its detrimental relationship with the environment. Clean infrastructure eliminates the need to build industries on remote brown sites, focusing on the prevention of adverse effects on the landscape and the population’s health and wellbeing. The concept of using manure-loam composite as a structural building material provides new opportunities for cost-effective architecture for towns that are economically struggling. The material is renewable and easily accessed in New Zealand, while rammed earth construction enables future growth and expansion. Using an artistic approach in constructing manure-loam buildings has the potential to produce an aesthetic distinctive of rural New Zealand. ‘Renewal of the Abject’ proposes a Megastructure to enforce a powerful urban connection between the hills and the lake with a self-sufficient spine making use of dairy waste and sewage as a building material. The reimagining of this abject materiality forms a critical discourse throughout the project influencing additional design explorations. This thesis explores current thinking around urban planning, Material production and reuse, and architectural detailing through design-led research. Perhaps, presenting an issue of scope where design exploration entered different academic fields, touching upon charged lines of research, rather than solely interrogating the architectural discipline. Proposing a megastructure in the Horowhenua district would seem counterproductive in this degraded landscape. However, compacting urban sprawl into a dense core along the eastwest axis sets out a development framework that conserves land and maximises public activity at the centre of a currently sleepy town. The megastructure can expand along this line, servicing the functions of Levin in a self-sufficient manner, unlike a typical New Zealand strip town that feeds off services along the main highway. Integrating infrastructure and megastructure challenges modernist attempts to zone cities by function and aims to build clean infrastructure integrated into compact urban areas. Architecture as infrastructure challenges the public understanding of production and manufacturing and their natural consequences. A redefinition of industry for the twenty-first century could improve its detrimental relationship with the environment. Clean infrastructure eliminates the need to build industries on remote brown sites, focusing on the prevention of adverse effects on the landscape and the population’s health and wellbeing. The concept of using manure-loam composite as a structural building material provides new opportunities for cost-effective architecture for towns that are economically struggling. The material is renewable and easily accessed in New Zealand, while rammed earth construction enables future growth and expansion. Using an artistic approach in constructing manure-loam buildings has the potential to produce an aesthetic distinctive of rural New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Anthropocentric: Real-time data for human centric architecture

    Voss, Timothy (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This is thesis explores applications of Mixed Reality, commonplace technologies and representation techniques in embodied and interactive design, through the development of an airport wayfinding system. The proposition that airports can be difficult to navigate, struggling to foster social connections, along with the challenging notion of providing an interface for Big Data spatially to users, motivates the research. The development of personalised spatial way finding techniques aids methods for the use of location and big data to ergonomically and spatially represent users’ navigation of space. Through methods of connecting people virtually within a single physical location using a unified design language, social implications of space are enhanced and extended. Finally, space which functions efficiency provides real-time feedback. Key theory in Human Computer Interaction and Embodied Design informs the research, through mixed reality, technology and data-form translations. Research is done over two stages, the first explores data inputs from users and represents these in 2D graphics. The second develops three separate design elements to create a spatial way finding system, to allow user engagement. These are a virtual projection, a set of physical forms and a set of wearable device applications. Design development happens through iterations within each experiment, and are always informed by previous work. The result is an inhabitable data space with seamless embodied design exploring the localisation of large sets of data.

    View record details
  • Calendar 1979

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1979)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Return to Vernacular Origins through Parametric Interpretation

    Zhang, Yunjing (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Without any doubts, China has made a remarkable development in various fields in a last decade, and there are no any signs of that the paces of rapid development happened to China will slow down in the next decades. As a result, every city in China are entering into a boom period in term of urbanization and modernization. No matter it is a super metropolis, for instant, Shanghai, Beijing or it is a small city as Yangzhou, the one chosen for this research thesis, they are all a part of this rapid booming trending and progress. Parametric architecture has been playing a significant role in this booming period: avant-garde forms, incredibly large scale, starchitect such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas etc, and extra economic value added, all these features had made parametric architecture to be considered as the symbol of the rapid development. At same time, the voice of critical on this has never stopped: lack of traditions, absence of “Chineseness”, cities identity damaged caused by parametric architecture. Unfortunately, there seems neither nothing going to stop numerous parametric architecture raised up, nor provide a convincible solution to the issues in the contemporary cites in China. This thesis explores the conflict between Chinese vernacular manner and parametric architecture, and investigate how the parametric architecture is able to well fit in the Chinese environment context and express Chinese vernacular ideas which needs to be redefined. It argues the so called ‘Chineseness’ is blur and unclear, or most of people ‘s understanding toward ‘Chineseness’ always stay at the iconic level. It further argue the essences of Chinese vernacular ideas which could be merged into parametric architecture and help to deal with the issues which the contemporary city in China has such as inhumanity scale, lack of green space and public space. The aim is not only to find a way to combine the parametric design and Chinese vernacular ideas harmoniously but also via this combination to solve the issues in Yangzhou which is a representative and typical China contemporary city.

    View record details
  • Calendar 1985

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1985)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1996

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1996)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Curation

    McEwan, Zachary (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Today we see a simplification in our landscapes; a globalisation of culture and landscape that has forced people into a state of disconnection with place. It has divided our world into culturally rich, and culturally absent worlds. Worlds where natural ecologies are seen as separate entities to the human cultures that live on the land. Our landscapes need to reconnect and adapt; not only to the ever increasingly culturally diverse world, but also to the site specific social and natural ecologies that exist. Wainuiomata is no exemption to this condition. Its suburban landscape is divided from the natural ecologies that lay dormant on its peripheries. It is an austere environment, but one with a colourful and culturally diverse community that is unable to express itself. This piece of research argues that landscape architecture has the ability to enable disadvantaged communities to rekindle a sense of connection with, and custodianship over their landscapes. It discusses ways of designing that can reform lost relationships between communities and the common ground they live upon. The work brings forward how landscapes can be designed in ways that provide opportunities not only for communities to self build their landscape, but also how the architect can create frameworks that facilitate a process of engagement at different scales. It further explores how a respect for ecological environments can be instilled into the community through building relationships between ecological and social environments, as opposed to their current segregation. Lastly, the thesis looks at how a landscape architect may design in a way that pushes beyond the final drawings. Doing this with an understanding that it is a curation of a process (one where communities can become a part of the making of a landscape) that will bring a sense of custodianship to its dwellers.

    View record details
  • Calendar 1982

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1982)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details