159 results for Thesis, 1960

  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

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  • Structural, tectonic and climatic control of the fluvial geomorphology of the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge

    Fair, Eileen Eleanor (1968)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The Manawatu River is one of the major rivers of the North Is1and of New Zealand, draining a catchment of 2,296 square miles. The river is over 120 miles long and is one of the few rivers in the world to rise on one side on an axial mountain range, flow through the range and enter the sea on the opposite side. (See Fig.1.) The Manawatu River, rising on the eastern flanks of the Ruahine Range flows south to the 'Dannevirke Depression' (Lillie, 1953, 89) where it Joins the northeastwards-flowing Mangahao, Mangatainoka and Tiraumea Rivers. These rivers with catchments on the eastern side of the Tararua-Ruahine Range, drain an elongated basin which extends from north of Dannevirke to south of Eketahuna. They join the Manawatu River in the Dannevirke Depression then flow westwards across the Tararua-Ruahine Range in the Manawatu Gorge to the Kairanga alluvial plain. Although only one-third of the river's catchment lies to the west of the axial range, the river here has an attenuated course of 63 miles, a little more than half its total length. Between February and April 1967 the writer completed a preliminary study of the terraces along the Manawatu River, between the Manawatu Gorge and the river mouth at Foxton. Investigations revealed that the best terrace development existed on the ten miles between the Gorge and Palmerston North whereas, in the lower reaches, terrace development is limited by prevalence of flooding, the swampy nature of the terrain and the progradation of the coastline. The unstable sand dunes of the coastal belt have also masked most of the terrace series in the lower reaches of the river.

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  • The segmental sensory innervation of the skin of the sheep : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Science from Massey University

    Kirk, Edwin James (1967)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The interest in the segmental basis of cutaneous sensory innervation evinced by the ancient Greeks was developed into a major contribution to experimental biology by the studies in man and animals by Sherrington, Head and Foerster. The present study is one of a number of more recent investigations of the dermatomes in animals from which a great deal of comparative information has been obtained. The particular significance of a study of the functional anatomy of the sheep in relation to veterinary medicine has been discussed. The experimental work described in this thesis involved particular consideration of the following 1. The features of the topographical anatomy of the vertebral column of the sheep which were found to be of importance in the experimental procedures. 2. The value of the "remaining sensibility" technique as a means of defining the dermatomes of the sheep. 3. The use of figurines and photographs in the schematic representation of the experimental results. 4. The justification for basing the definition of the dermatomes largely on the responses to pinch stimuli. 5. A discussion of the features of the dermatomes of the sheep in relation to embryological development and the observations which have been made in other species. 6. The changes in muscle tonus in the limbs which followed section of the dorsal spinal nerve roots or damage to the spinal cord. 7. The aberrations in feeding, defecation, micturition and respiration produced by various dorsal root sections. 8. The major pathways in the spinal cord followed by the primary afferent fibres, as revealed by the Marchi technique. 9. A general consideration of the significance of studies such as the present, and their possible extension to include deeper somatic or visceral structures. Details of the dorsal root sections undertaken have been provided in an appendix.

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  • The development of unploughable hill country : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Massey University

    Wright, A. (1963)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study is an investigation into the relative non-acceptance by farmers of new technology in the form of the Te Awa type of hill country development. It embodies an investigation into the physical and economic aspects of development, and of the factors which are currently limiting or preventing development. Technological change can be defined as change which results in an objective or end being achieved in a physically different way. Of particular interest are those changes which increase profits, although whether a change is in fact profitable, may require a fairly detailed investigation. There are three major sources of new technology in agriculture; firstly, from research aimed at developing and proving new techniques, (e.g. the breeding of improved pasture species); secondly, as an unplanned by-product of pure research (e.g. the n-type Romney sheep); and thirdly, from planned or chance discovery by farmers, (e.g. the Hunter fence).

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  • Palmerston North : a study of suburban shops and services : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Worthington, Christine Rosemary (1969)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Aim The aim of the thesis is to try to establish, through a study of suburban shops and services in Palmerston North, some of the past and present trends and patterns which might assist in the future planning of suburban facilities. Chapter I describes the general patterns of suburban shops and services. In Chapters II, III and IV shopping centres of four or more shops and services are examined in greater detail, while Chapter V is a case study of shops, services and shopping patterns in Milson suburb. Method Direct observation and classification of suburban shops and services was followed by interviews with shopkeepers in some suburban shopping centres, and finally a random sample of Milson shoppers was interviewed in their homes. The first task was to order and define suburban shops and services so that they could be studied. The Palmerston North City Council Town Planning Department's definition of the central business district (or city centre) was used, and shops within its boundaries excluded. All other shops listed in the Town Planning Department's booklet "Suburban Shopping: List of Activities: March 1968" were marked on large-scale maps of the city and checked in the field; new shops were added and defunct ones deleted. All the different functions found in suburban shopping centres were listed (Table III) and groups of shops were classified according to the number of shops and services situated together (Table I). The location of shops and services and the association of functions were mapped, and the larger groups of shops with four or more functions, termed shopping centres, were studied in detail. All the owners or managers of shops, as well as hairdressers and barbers in all the major shopping centres (10 - 16 functions) and some of the minor centres (4 - 8 functions) were interviewed. Only three people refused to answer the questionnaire (Appendix A), and in two of these cases some of the information was obtained from the firms' managers. In order to obtain detailed information on shopping patterns, and to compare the use of suburban shops with visits to the city centre and other shops, a random sample of 95 Milson shoppers was interviewed in their homes (Appendix B).

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  • The Significance of subsurface water as a geomorphic agent in an area of the Greywacke Ranges near Whitehall

    Oliver, Timothy Ian (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The area chosen for study is situated in the Whitehall district approximately 7 ½ miles ENE of Cambridge at GR N66/106378 (Figure 1). Recent mass movement features on part of the south and southeast-facing slopes of a valley that is tributary to the Karapiro Stream, and thence the Waikato River, were studied in some detail, but reference is also made to specific features in the area draining to the east. The southwest-facing slopes, with a relative relief of nearly 500 feet, rise to about 1,200 feet a.s.1., where a plateau-like surface dissected by broad mass movement gullies, slopes gradually to the east.

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  • The Conservation Movement in New Zealand

    Allen, Peter D.H. (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Over the past 150 years of European settlement of New Zealand, the basis of economic growth has been the exploitation of her natural resources. The object of this study is to examine the character, motives, and exploitation of the natural resources, and the growth of attitudes to conservation. Because of the scope that such a study could cover, it is necessary to restrict it to the more outstanding characteristics of the movement for conservation in New Zealand. In the first chapter the conservation movement, particularly that of the United States, will be discussed. This will be followed in Chapter II by an examination of the resource elements of New Zealand in terms of their nature and degree of exhaustibility. In Chapter III, conservation policies and attitudes towards various resources will be identified, from the early years of European settlement to the end of World War II. The changing attitudes to the utilisation of resources, will be examined to determine their relative importance in deciding how various resources will be utilised. Contemporary attitudes to the utilisation of utilisation of resources, and to the conservation of those resources will be examined in Chapter IV. In the final chapter an attempt will be made to - 6 - identify a "conservation movement" in New Zealand in terms of the development of attitudes to resource use over the 150 years of European settlement. This study is made with the aim of highlighting developments in conservation thought at a time when the implications of' "conservation" are assuming increasing importance for New Zealand.

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  • A Pilot investigation into the assessment of changes in the psycholinguistic abilities of new-entrant Māori school children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities

    St George, William Vivian Ross (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The role of language as the principal medium of instruction within the New Zealand (N .Z.) educational system has recently received increasing attention both from researchers and those responsible for the formulation of our national educational policy. In particular, much attention has been directed toward the Maori pupil and the use of the English language as the medium for his instruction. The range of literature on this question includes controlled research studies on English usage by Maori children, educational policy statements concerning the - medium of instruction to be employed in New Zealand schools and writings of a more speculative, and potentially political nature, questioning educational policy and the role of language in "Maori education".

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  • The Effects of psychiatric status, sex, and concepts rated on semantic differential response style

    Priest, Peter Neville (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The psychological literature contains evidence that the Semantic Differential (SD) (Osgood, Suci and Tannenbaum, 1957) is capable of differentiating psychiatric groups from normal controls on the basis of checking style. There were three specific aims of this present study. The first was to gain further confirmation of the ability of the SD to distinguish psychiatric patients from normal subjects. The second was to see whether the sex of the subject affected his checking style and thirdly, the writer wished to see whether the actual concepts used with the SD affected response tendency. However, before these three hypotheses are discussed in detail an introduction to the SD and a review of the important literature on the instrument are in order.

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  • Balance, cognitive tuning, status and positivity bias in communication of impressions

    Armstrong, Warwick David (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Experiment 1 (n=120) was a 3x2x2 analysis of variance design, investigating the interaction of the effect of cognitive tuning, balance and sex on polarization of personality impressions. While balance variables influenced polarization it did not mask the different polarization effects of the cognitive tuning sets, transmission and reception. The checking of positive traits outstriped the checking of negative traits by a factor of 2. 25. Males polarized more than females. Experiment 2 (n=40) investigated the interaction of tuning, sex and status. Status and sex effects on polarization were significantly different on transmission tuning only.

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  • An administrative history of the Otago Museum

    McRobie, Alan David (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 214 leaves :maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Hakataramea valley : a reconnaissance survey.

    Cant, Louise Rhoda (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 217 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography. Maps: Geological map of New Zealand, 1:250,000, sheet 23, Oamaru; and New Zealand, 1:63,360, sheet S118, Hakataramea.

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  • The development of Otago's main road network

    Baker, Neill Reginald (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 112 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • The political structure of New Zealand 1858-1861

    Wood, Gilbert A. (1965)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    By 1858 New Zealand had had less than twenty years of settled government and a responsible ministry had been in office for only two years. The colony had a small and dispersed population of about 60,000 Europeans, mostly born in England or children of Englishmen, and 56,000 Maoris. The difficulties of the newly independent, or partly independent state, are familiar to us today. The new settler rulers of mid-nineteenth century New Zealand had many advantages over modern nation-builders, not least of which was the absence of a sense of urgency, of the need to modernise the economy or create a new sovereign state over-night. There was no oppressed urban or peasant class. The settlers' society was homogeneous, comparatively highly literate, and educated in the traditions of parliamentary government. The depressed race in the country - the Maoris - could be confined within certain areas of the country, and gradually subdued without a vocal international concern to disturb the Government's conscience, although the Government could not escape obstreperous missionaries or the criticisms of humanitarians in the home country. But even these pressures were not felt until the settlers had had several years in which to consolidate a new political regime. The aim of this study has been to seek the underlying structure and order of the political system and to see how the settlers adapted their institutions and traditions to meet the problems with which they were faced. How did the political system work? Was it efficient and adequate? How did the various parts fit together? (…) This thesis is a study of a more settled period; a period of increasing order and rationalisation of structure, a period of comparative peace before the impact of the Maori wars and of the gold rushes. In particular this is a study of the central institutions of government: the legislature, the executive and the judiciary. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Aspects of the biology of some New Zealand echinoderms : feeding, growth and reproduction in the asteroids, Patiriella regularis (Verrill, 1867) and Coscinasterias calamaria (Gray, 1840).

    Crump, Robin (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    192 leaves :illus. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: p.138-147. The author's "The flight response in Struthiolaria papulosa giges Sowerby", reprinted from the New Zealand journal of marine and freshwater research, v.2, no.3, Sept., 1968, in pocket. University of Otago department: Zoology

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  • Sir Henry Atkinson: A political biography, 1872-1892

    Bassett, Judith (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis attempts to examine in some detail the political career of Sir Harry Atkinson who held Cabinet rank for twelve of the twenty years it covers, and who dominated the Treasury for more than a decade, yet upon whom historians have so for been reluctant to expend very much thought or research. In the earliest histories of nineteenth century New Zealand Atkinson appears briefly as a sinister, equivocal figure, and in the later histories he assumes a bluff, honest aspect. Neither school presents a three-dimensional figure.

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  • Some aspects of prostatic cytology

    Fitzgerald, Norman W (1961)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: 2 v.: illustrations.

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  • Structural analysis in the middle Shotover valley, North West Otago

    Barry, John Michael (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan access to Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department. Description: vii, 95 leaves : illus., diagrs., map (in pocket) ; 27 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Geology. Bibliography: p. 79-85.

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  • The geology of an area surrounding Hyde, Central Otago

    MacPherson, James Malcolm (1969)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan access to Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department. Format: ix, 87 leaves : illus., fold. maps (in pockets) ; 28 cm.

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  • Sir Arthur Hamilton-Gordon - Governor of New Zealand and High Commissioner for the western Pacific, 1880-1882

    Mitchell, Robert Wyndham (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Long essay presented for the degree of Master of Arts in history. The post of Western Pacific High Commissioner established by the Order in Council of 17th. August 1877 continued to exist until 1952, and, except for one short period (1880-82) it was held by the Governor of Fiji. During the period 1880-82 the post was held by the Governor of New Zealand, Sir Arthur Gordon who had previously been the first Governor of Fiji (1875-80) and the first Western Pacific High Commissioner.

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