5,468 results for Thesis, 2000

  • The world makers : one centre's approach to technology education with infants and toddlers

    Mortlock, Anita (2004)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Infants and toddlers are surrounded by technology. They observe and explore technological artefacts and the uses of them on a daily basis. Despite this, there is little research to guide teachers about what the technological interests, understandings and capabilities of infants and toddlers might be and how they might be supported and extended. Technology education is a relative/y new curriculum area and it has not yet been included in the literary discourse about infant and toddler educational programmes. This study aims to examine what the teachers at one childcare centre identify as the technology interests, understandings and capabilities of a small group of infants and toddlers. Video footage was taken of the infants and toddlers at work and play and segments were then shown to individual teachers during interviews. The children's assessment portfolios were examined and the teachers and families were invited to contribute further information. The sum total of this data was used to analyse and reflect on particular episodes of video footage. The technological interests, understandings and capabilities of both the children and the adults were seen to be integrally linked to the temporal, physical and interpersonal environments of the centre.

    View record details
  • Generational differences in work values, work-related outcomes and person-organisation values fit : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Cennamo, Lucy K (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Values are important constructs in guiding behaviour and enhancing motivation in the workplace. However, more research is required into generational patterns in work values, particularly as much of the information regarding age differences is based on stereotypes. The aim of this research was to investigate differences between the four generational groups currently in the workforce (Matures, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Baby Boom Echo), according to work values and the work-related outcomes of job satisfaction, affective organisational commitment and intention to leave. The study also examined how differing values may contribute to the perception of person-organisation values fit. An overall theoretical model of person-organisation values fit and outcomes was developed and then assessed for invariance across age using structural equation modelling. A sample of 504 Auckland employees completed a questionnaire (either online or via pencil and paper). Results indicated that the youngest generations (the Generation X and Echo group) placed more importance on status-related work values than the oldest generations (the Matures and Baby Boomers). The Echo group also placed more importance on having a social working environment than the Matures and Boomers. Freedom-related work values were also rated as being more important to the Echo group than any other generation. The two youngest generations showed greater intent to leave their organisations in the next 12 months compared with older groups. In terms of perceived fit between individual values and organisational values, Matures and Boomers reported better fit with extrinsic values than Generation X, and better fit with status-related values than the Echo group. The model of overall person-organisation values fit and outcomes was confirmed, and was invariant across groups, suggesting that the overall fit process was consistent across age. The findings from this study offer insight into possible areas for organisational intervention to enhance communication and acceptance between generational groups. Future areas of research are also suggested to improve understanding of this field.

    View record details
  • Interaction with text : a study of teachers' mediation of materials in mainstream and ESOL secondary school classrooms : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Second Language Teaching at Massey University

    Davey, Sarah Elizabeth (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The increasingly multi-cultural nature of New Zealand society is accompanied by burgeoning school enrolments of students whose first language is not English (called ESOL students in this study). Immigration, refugee movements, and the recruitment of international students for largely economic purposes, all contribute to this. Whilst many of these students are competent English speakers when they enrol at our schools, large numbers are not. In secondary schools, regardless of English language competence, most ESOL students are placed in mainstream classes for the majority of their timetable, with the addition of a relatively small amount of specialist English language tuition. How do both these mainstream and ESOL teachers address the language learning needs of these students? Because texts remain central to classroom teaching and learning, this study considers how teachers mediate texts with students. It has a particular focus on how this mediation contributes to the language learning environment for ESOL students in both mainstream and ESOL classes, using classroom observation as its primary source of data. This study reveals both predictable and unexpected results. It is not surprising that it finds extensive use of questioning by teachers in their mediation of texts. However, the value of copious recall or display questions for senior secondary school students is challenged by this study, and the importance is asserted of referential questioning to develop critical thinking skills in relation to text. The preponderance of teacher-dominated classrooms and classroom language is a disappointing finding of this study, especially because the study reveals that students say very little in such an environment. More collaborative and interactive teaching methods would help ESOL students use, and therefore learn, English more effectively. Thus the study finds a lot of class time invested in the use of texts, but comparatively little effective mediation to help both native-speaking and ESOL students comprehend the language of the texts. The study reveals the need for teachers to acknowledge their role as teachers of language, and especially to mediate texts with students by teaching reading strategies.

    View record details
  • The search for 'self' for lifestyle travellers

    Cohen, Scott Allen (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 186 leaves : maps. ; 30 cm. Notes: "February 27th 2009". University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2009. Includes bibliographical references.

    View record details
  • The free child health care scheme : implications for New Zealand general practice

    Dovey, Susan May (2002)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 260 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

    View record details
  • The social construction of femininities in a rural New Zealand community

    Gill, Erica Jane (2007)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-90). "June 2007"

    View record details
  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

    View record details
  • The impact of patents on New Zealand's biotechnology and genetics services sectors

    Green, Aphra (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 155 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 151-155. University of Otago department: Law

    View record details
  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

    View record details
  • Customary international law in National Courts: a comparative analysis

    Bottermann, Uwe (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    88 leaves :maps (1 in pocket) plates ; 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 83-88. University of Otago department: Law. "October 2000"

    View record details
  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

    View record details
  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

    View record details
  • Habitats and macroinvertebrate fauna of the reef-top of Rarotonga, Cook Islands : implications for fisheries and conservation management

    Drumm, Darrin Jared (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 173, [6] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science. "December 2004."

    View record details
  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

    View record details
  • Open population capture-recapture models and diabetes in Otago

    Cameron, Claire (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 207 leaves :ill., ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

    View record details
  • Care ethics and brain injury

    Butler, Mary (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    It is generally supposed that a supportive family can have an influence on outcomes for an adult with severe brain injury, but there is very little known about what effective families actually do. In this research the families of five such individuals were involved in an ethnographic project that lasted for one year. The literature review brought together insights from brain injury, care ethics, disability studies and anthropology. These insights were combined with a process of reflective equilibrium that was applied to the ethnographic material in order to determine the ethics of the carers. Ethics of care in this setting was conceived of as a positive practice ethic, rather than as a series of negative conundrums posed by the brain injury. The practice ethic shared by carers meant that they all conceived of the need created by brain injury in humanistic terms, rather than in terms of pathology. Carers demonstrated virtues appropriate to their practice as they helped the adult with brain injury to connect with aspects of ordinary life. The best outcomes for the adult with brain injury included being able to engage in productive activity and to make a place in the world. These outcomes could only be achieved with due regard for their safety and subsistence. The practice ethic of carers was demonstrated in the skills and concern that ensured a satisfactory outcome for the adult with brain injury. This research is a departure from recent research about families affected by brain injury, which has focused on the burden involved in care. An examination of what carers achieve suggests that burden may be associated with the development of caring practice. The transformative capacity of care, for both the carer and the adult with brain injury, is emphasized. However contextual factors, such as adequate compensation, are connected to the capacity of the carer to engage in good practice and these are explored also in this thesis. In particular, relevant aspects of the relationship between families and the Accident Compensation Corporation are explored.

    View record details
  • An exploration of Maori health state preferences

    Perkins, Matthew R V (2000)

    Thesis
    University of Otago

    The allocation of publicly funded resources in the health sector via Cost Utility Analysis requires preferences for different health states to be known. While preferences for New Zealanders as a whole have been elicited, the possibility of different preferences among Maori remain. This research explores this possibility as well as looking at what Maori perceive as health and draws conclusions from these findings relating to priority setting and resource allocation in the health sector. Using the EQ-5D (a generic health state classification system) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) preferences were elicited for a sample of 64 Maori from three main groups in a face-to-face interview style setting. An additional five participants were involved in a post questionnaire interview to try and gain greater understanding of the process involved in the questionnaire completion. Data from participants was scaled according to conventional procedures with full health and "dead" anchored at 1 and 0 respectively and other valuations interpolated and extrapolated appropriately. Statistical tests comparing the mean values of each health state from the current sample to both Maori and non-Maori from a New Zealand wide postal survey were then undertaken. The health state preferences for the Maori group were found to be very similar to both the Maori and non-Maori from the previous research. Unfortunately the vast majority of participants neglected to place the health state "dead" on the VAS meaning that their valuations were unable to be scaled and included in the majority of the analysis. Qualitative data from both the questionnaire and the interviews suggest that there is more to health than as described in the questionnaire but this is not Maori specific and related equally to non-Maori, The lack of difference in preferences implies that it does not matter whose valuations are used in priority setting as the end result will be the same. Further research would be beneficial to investigate why the state "dead" was omitted from being valued. Also, a larger sample of Maori would be useful to provide stronger conclusions than the limited ones drawn here as a result of the low number of participants valuing "dead".

    View record details
  • Generation X’ers’ values and how they perceive the New Zealand labour market

    Lavender, Erin (2000-07)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    My research was based around skilled Generation X employees and what they value in long-term employment relationships. Initially my research was looking at employee retention in organisations, I began an initial literature review on this topic but was swamped with information and found that I would need to narrow my research. One area that was not well understood in the literature was employee retention methods for different age groups. This prompted me to look at Generation X and what they value in employment relationships, as away to understand how to better suit their needs and hopefully illustrate the ways in which they can be retained. I also believed that understanding the New Zealand labour market and illustrating how things like the brain drain, the new psychological contact, and the idea of mobile careers maybe having an affect on organisations and individuals was important and may in some way could be tied to Generation X'ers values in employment relationships. I began my research with a literature review on what Generation X employees are said to value in employment relationships, the main themes that were illustrated by the literature were such things as feedback, training and development, balanced lifestlyes, and fun. I also reviewed literature on issues I thought were relevant to the New Zealand labour Market including the brain drain, the new psychological contract and the notion of mobile careers Once my literature review was complete I established a number of questions I wished to find answers to including: 1. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers are pertinent issues to managing/retaining Generation X? 2. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers exists in the context of the New Zealand labour market? 3. What effect do they perceive these things have on the New Zealand labour market? 4. Do these things affect them personally? 5. What do graduate Generation X workers value in long-term employment relationships? 6. Do these Generation X employees perceive the organisation they work for as being able to understand their values?

    View record details
  • Open market share repurchases in New Zealand

    Henderson, George (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    When a firm repurchases its own common stock, it buys back a proportion of its own equity from existing shareholders. For open market transactions the stock is acquired at market value and in an efficient market the transfer should not change shareholders' wealth. However, empirically, such corporate activity in American markets is generally associated with stock price increases and, consequently, increases in remaining shareholder wealth. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of open market share repurchases on the share price of New Zealand firms. If any abnormal returns are identified then the hypotheses suggested by American studies will be investigated to see which, if any, hold for the New Zealand case.

    View record details
  • A comparison of IPOs from small and medium sized enterprises: China vs Australia

    Ze, Tian (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The general market behaviour of unseasoned new issues of Chinese A-shares and Australian common stock at the time of first day trading on respective stock exchanges is investigated, presenting a time-series analysis of the monthly volume and average initial returns on initial public offerings over a certain period of time. Also, the correlation of volume and underpricing among different groups of companies according to their size is studied. The underpricing of new stock issue defined as initial returns is widespread. The scale is extreme, especially on both the Shanghai Securities Exchange (SHSE) and Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) of China. The percentage of IPOs for small and medium sized enterprises is increasing in China and decreasing in Australia on average during the period presented in this paper. The results show that there is no significant difference in size between the companies listed on SHSE and SZSE in terms of total asset or revenue.

    View record details