347 results for Thesis, Undergraduate

  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • "Too much 'yellow' in the melting pot?" : perceptions of the New Zealand Chinese, 1930-1960.

    Law, Penelope (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    i, 65 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 61-65). Typescript (photocopied)

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  • A city in transition : diversification in the social life of Dunedin, 1860-1864.

    McCarthy, M. P. (1977)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 133 leaves :ill., facsim. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 128-133.

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  • Fighting fit? A study of the Army's medical examinations, 1916-1918.

    Callon, Lynette (1980)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 57 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. map ; 30 cm.

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  • Women in New Zealand industry : with special reference to factory industry and to conditions in Dunedin.

    Unwin, Diana Mary (1944)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    85 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 81-85. (Typescript)

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  • Ethel Benjamin, New Zealand's first woman lawyer.

    Brown, Carol (1985)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    139 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: l.136-139. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The New Zealand returned services' association. 1916-1943

    Mayhew, William Richardson (1943)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 53 leaves :maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. (Typescript)

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  • Domestic disquiet? : New Zealand responses to conflict in Malaya/Malaysia 1954-1966

    Sargison, Georgina (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 89 leaves, [9] leaves of plates :ill., facisms., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 84-89. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Vestibular Function in Vestibular Schwannoma

    Tranter-Entwistle, Isaac Brian (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Abstract Introduction: Traditionally vestibular function has been assessed using caloric irrigations; new methods have failed to reach the same level of accuracy. Vestibular nerve dysfunction occurs with ‘acoustic neuroma’ or ‘vestibular schwannoma. Quantitative testing of hearing by audiometry is much more widely available than quantitative vestibular testing, although consideration of vestibular dysfunction is part of clinical management. Validation of a new method of quantitative vestibular function testing could lead to more widespread integration into clinical practice and affect decision making (i.e. timing of surgery) Methods: A non-blind observational cohort study was undertaken in 31 participants. Study endpoints were either one or two separate participant measures in March/April 2013 the September/October 13. All participants underwent caloric and head impulse testing with video-oculography, while 10 underwent audiometric assessment. Repeat testing was performed for 10 subjects, including additional cognitive. The primary outcome was vestibular function test measures. Results: Video head impulse was strongly correlated with calorics (p=0.01) and showed good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (70%). Dizziness Handicap Inventory showed no correlation with other vestibular function measures. Participants showed reduced cognitive function tested using the CANTAB battery (p=0.01) Conclusion: Video head impulse testing is comparable to caloric testing to assess vestibular function. Vestibular lesions may lead to cognitive deficits. Further research is needed to better understand the role of video head impulse testing in vestibular schwannoma.

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  • Intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies

    Woodcock, Richard James (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Australia is shifting towards a knowledge-based economy. Even though there is an increasing emphasis on intellectual capital by Australian firms there is no mandatory intellectual capital disclosure standard. This suggests that what intellectual capital information Australian companies disclose is done voluntarily. This study examines whether this voluntary intellectual capital disclosure is occurring and whether a company’s characteristics influence the level of its intellectual capital disclosure by proposing two research questions. Firstly, what is the extent and content of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies? And secondly, what firm-specific characteristics are determinants of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies? Content analysis is used to gather data on intellectual capital disclosure levels and content of a sample of seventy listed Australian companies. Analysing the descriptive statistics of this data addresses this study’s first research question. In order to attend to the second research question five firm-specific characteristics are examined, industry classification, ownership concentration, leverage, listing age, and auditor type. Five hypotheses propose whether these five independent variables have an association with the level of intellectual capital disclosures or not. To operationalise the level of intellectual capital disclosure, as a dependent variable, the data gathered from the content analysis is utilised to calculate a disclosure index. Correlation and multiple regression analyses are performed to statistically test the five hypotheses. This study found that there is a limited awareness by Australian companies towards intellectual capital disclosures. The levels of intellectual capital disclosures were reasonably low and there was also inconsistency of the level of disclosure among firms. In terms of the content of disclosures, external capital was found to be the most frequently disclosed category of intellectual capital. This finding was consistent with previous intellectual capital disclosure studies in the Australian context. Through statistical testing, this study found that companies that operate in high intellectual capital intensive industries, and companies with a Big Four auditing firm disclose greater levels of intellectual capital information. It was found that a company’s ownership concentration, leverage level, and listing age do not influence its intellectual capital disclosure behaviour. The results of this study extend the scant research in this area of accounting, and they also provide practical implications for Australian accounting standard regulators.

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  • IC3:Information and Communication integration using VCoIP between 3 collaborating parties

    Sun, Jian (2006-10)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    This study develops a new communication and collaboration supported tool – IC3. In particular, this tool is an integration of open source video conference over internet protocol (VCoIP) and virtual network computing (VNC) projects. This integrated system supports both virtual communication and collaborated web information sharing. In addition, it aims to facilitate greater eye contact and seating arrangements. The results from a set of heuristic evaluations show that the IC3 system is an effective communication and collaboration tool, and it does improve users’ eye contact and feeling of sitting around a table.

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  • A history of the relations between church and state in New Zealand

    Kirk, William Ronald (1942)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 111 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • Milton, the rural depression experience

    Panjabi, Jayashree (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iv, 65 leaves : photo (fold.) ; 30 cm. Notes: Tapes of the interviews accompany this thesis. Not to be quoted without the author's permission. Bibliography: leaves 61-65.

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  • Genome Architecture and Phenotypic Plasticity: Is the Lethal (2) Essential for Life cluster epigenetically regulated during ovary activation in the honeybee, Apis mellifera?

    Lovegrove, Mackenzie R. (2013)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of an organism to alter its phenotype, without altering its genome, in response to environmental cues. There is mounting evidence it is involved in human development, where it has been implicated in the risk of developing noncommunicable adult diseases. Studying the molecular basis of this in mammals can be difficult, particularly separating out single influences from complex environmental interactions. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, provides a useful model in which to study plasticity because of its well-controlled, easily triggered plastic responses. Queen bees are normally the only reproductively active females within a hive, but workers can activate their ovaries in response to the loss of the queen. During this process, over a third of the genome shows altered gene expression, implying that coordinated gene regulation within a chromatin domain may play a role. We have identified a candidate cluster for investigating this hypothesis, the Lethal (2) Essential for Life (L(2)efl) group. The genes of which are down-regulated as the workers undergo ovary activation. The findings of this study show that the original boundaries of the chromatin domain had been underestimated, and that the CTCF insulator element binding sites which flank the genes of the Lethal(2)efl cluster, LOC100576174 and Gmap, appear to be the boundaries of the coordinated regulation. All of the genes within these sites show co-ordinated regulation, with expression occurring in the terminal filament cells of the ovary in queens, workers and active workers. As ovary activation is a phenotypically plastic response to an environmental cue, it was hypothesised that the mechanisms which underlie it are epigenetic in nature, with previous work identifying the repressive histone mark H3K27me3 as likely playing a role in ovary activation. Potential binding sites for the ecdysteroid-regulated transcription factors BR-C Z1 and Z4 were found for all of the genes within the CTCF binding sites, and none directly outside it (LOC411452 and LOC412824). The proposed model for the coordinated regulation of the genes within the chromatin domain containing the L(2)efl group is through an interaction of both histone modifications and ecdysteroid-regulated transcription factors. This work provides evidence for large scale, coordinated changes in gene expression leading to phenotypic plasticity in response to an environmental influence.

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  • Abduction Strength Deficiency: How Common, How Early and How Amendable?

    Chen, Shumou (2014)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Gluteus medius strength deficiency has been linked to various injuries of the lower limb (Fairclough et al., 2007, Bullock-Saxton et al., 1993, Powers et al., 2003, Williams and Cohen, 2009). However there is limited information in the literature about the prevalence of this condition among healthy individuals. When observing peoples’ walking patterns, it is common to see excess side to side movement indicative of abduction strength deficiencies. However the conventional dynamometry strength testing generally show normal results despite the person having an abnormal gait pattern and the conventional exercise used to treat this condition is not yet proven to be effective. A recently published study on Australian Rules footballers suggested that hip abduction weakness does occur in healthy people when a previously unpublished test was used. It uncovered the weakness and using the same position as an exercise was capable of correcting it (Osborne et al., 2012). The current study investigated the testing position against conventional testing positions and the exercise against conventional exercises. This study also investigated the possibility of growth related hip abduction strength deficiency in high school aged males. Three studies were used to investigate the new testing position and exercise. An observational study among 101 healthy adults was completed to investigate the prevalence of hip abduction strength deficiency and compare the new hip abduction testing position to conventional hip abduction testing positions. An interventional study was completed to investigate the effects of the new abduction exercise against a conventional abduction exercise and an adduction exercise as controls. This study involved three 1st XV rugby teams with a intervention period of two months. The third study was also an observational study involving 105 high school students. This study investigated the prevalence of abduction strength deficiency in relation to growth among high school aged males. In the study involving healthy adults, it was found that people tested the weakest in the new testing position. When the new hip abduction exercise was compared to conventional hip abduction exercises and an addcution exercise as a control, there were no significant strength improvements. The third study also found no hip abduction strength deifciency realted to growth among high school aged males. The recently published testing position may be a useful tool in uncovering hip abduction strength deficiency but as an exercise it did not produce any significant strength gains. Although a recently published study on Australian Rules Footballers suggested that hip abduction strength deficiency may occur due to growth (Osborne et al., 2012), this study suggested there were no growth related hip abduction strength deficiency.

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  • The Effects of Pharmacological Preconditioning with GYKI-52466 and Domoic Acid on LTP and LTD Induction in the Rat Hippocampus

    Macindoe, Jessica Ellen (2013)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are associated with severe memory loss and cognitive impairment, highlighting a critical demand for the development of neuroprotectants and nootropics. It has been shown that certain compounds can trigger lasting neuroprotective mechanisms. This phenomenon is called ‘pharmacological preconditioning,’ and it has recently been suggested that preconditioning may also enhance cognitive function. Indeed, preconditioning with GYKI-52466 and domoic acid (DOM) has prophylactic neuroprotective efficacy in vivo and in vitro, and preliminary in vitro results demonstrate their ability to enhance long term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD), thus denoting nootropic potential. The aim of the present study was develop an effective in vitro preconditioning strategy using GYKI-52466 or DOM, and clarify their effects on LTP and LTD induction in the rat hippocampus. Hippocampal slices from male Sprague Dawley rats were subject to acute or chronic preconditioning with 6 μM GYKI-52466, or acute preconditioning with 50 nM DOM. Control slices were not preconditioned. Slices subsequently underwent LTP or LTD induction, and electrophysiological techniques were used to assess the response to this. Orthodromic Schaffer collateral-evoked CA1 population spikes and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were monitored before and after LTP or LTD induction. Data were expressed as mean percentage change from baseline (± SEM) and group differences compared to controls at a 30 minute time-point post LTP or LTD induction was determined by an unpaired student’s t-test at a confidence level of P<0.05. GYKI-52466 and DOM preconditioning failed to enhance LTP and LTD induction. Both control and preconditioned slices exhibited comparable magnitudes of LTP and LTD for population spike amplitude, area and fEPSP slope, with no significant differences between control and preconditioned slices evident at a 30 minute time-point. These findings suggest that preconditioning with GYKI-52466 and DOM would not confer nootropic potential.

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  • Quality of Diabetic Foot Care in Oman

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim Saleh (2014)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a common and increasingly important chronic disease worldwide. In Oman, the setting of this thesis, the prevalence of diabetes was 12.3% in 2008. Diabetes causes substantial morbidity and mortality, with diabetic foot disease (DFD) being one of the most serious and costly complications of diabetes. Good preventive foot care measures, patient and provider education and adherence to proper foot self-care practices can reduce the risk of developing DFD by up to 85.0%. No published study has investigated diabetic foot care in Oman. Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the quality of diabetic foot care provided by primary and secondary health care professionals in an area of Muscat, Oman. The specific objectives were: 1) To ascertain the level of foot self-care amongst people with diabetes; 2) To determine the level of foot care education for people with diabetes provided by primary and secondary health care professionals; 3) To determine the level of professional foot care services provided to people with diabetes; and 4) To examine the association between foot self-care practices and known risk factors for diabetes-related foot disease (DRFD). Methods The study setting was eight primary health care clinics and one polyclinic in Alseeb, Muscat, Oman. A convenience sample of 350 Omani patients with diabetes (310 from primary health care and 40 from the polyclinic) were invited to participate in the study. A questionnaire developed from two pre-existing questionnaires and pre-tested and translated into Arabic, was administered by author of this thesis and research assistants. The questionnaire included six domains including demographic details, patient-reported DRFD, foot self-care, foot care education, and professional foot care. Data were checked, entered into Excel spreadsheet, and analysed using STATA Statistical Software version 12.0 (2012). Proportions and means were calculated as appropriate for variables of interest. To examine the association between dependent and independent variables, a one-way analysis of variance was used for categorical variables and product-moment correlation test for continuous variables. Ethical approval was obtained from the Medical Research and Ethics Review Committee, Ministry of Health, Oman. Results Of the 350 participants, 62.3% were female and more than half of the patients were illiterate (52.9%). DRFD was found to be common in this population with more than 55.0% of the study population reported having at least one or more sensory peripheral neuropathy symptoms, and almost half (49.1%) complained of one or more peripheral vascular disease symptoms in the last month. In spite of this, patients often did not adopt all recommended behavioural foot care practices. For example, 54.7% did not look at the bottoms of their feet daily, 58.4% reported using moisturising creams or lotions between their toes daily, and 46.0% reported wearing traditional Omani sandals which do not offer protection from injuries. Fewer than half of the participants reported receiving advice or information on recommended foot care practices from their diabetes health care professionals. Professional diabetes foot care services were suboptimal. For example, 20.4% of participants reported never being asked about numbness in their feet and 21.7% reported having been seen by a podiatrist during the previous year. In the final model, a statistically significant association was found between foot self-care scores and level of formal education, diabetes treatment and professional foot care. Conclusions and recommendations Despite the presence of DRFD in this Omani population with diabetes, the overall quality of diabetic foot care was suboptimal. From the patient perspective there is a need for high quality diabetic foot care education to improve patients’ foot care awareness and self-management. Patient education requires good communication skills and an understanding of patients’ education levels, and the influence of cultural, social and religious practices. A multidisciplinary team approach and ongoing foot care education for health care professionals is needed in order to improve their diabetic foot care knowledge and skills. To better understand the context, barriers to regular recommended foot self-care practices needs to be explored further, and the reasons for non-adherence to the Omani diabetes foot care guidelines by health care professionals requires further clarification. Nevertheless, findings from this study will be useful for health care planners and policy makers in Oman and neighbouring countries with similar health systems for improving the overall quality of diabetes foot care.

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  • Isolation and characterization of human dental pulp derived stem cells

    Kang, Isaac (Jinho) (2013)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: Dental caries remains a major public health concern. Dental endodontics (root canal) therapy involves extirpating the dental pulp and replacing with inert materials. For severe tooth decay, it is the only available treatment; however, it fails to restore the biological functions and vitality of the dental tissues and may ultimately leads to tooth loss. To overcome these shortcomings, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are being investigated as a novel prospective approach to regenerate the dental tissue. In this study, we isolated and purified DPSCs and characterized the purified cells. Objectives: The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to rapidly extirpate dental pulp tissues from human third molar teeth under sterile conditions; (ii) to isolate, characterize, and purify a heterogeneous population of DPSCs using mesenchymal stem cell markers; (iii) to determine the ability of DPSCs to differentiate down an odontoblastic lineage. Design: DPSCs were mechanically and chemically isolated from human impacted third molar teeth. Cells were expanded, passaged, and a heterogeneous population of DPSCs isolated using a cloning cylinder. DPSCs were characterized and purified by flow cytometry using the mesenchymal stem cell markers, STRO-1, CD44, and CD146. DPSCs were induced under two different odontogenic conditions comprising different concentrations of beta-glycerophosphate, and dexamethasone. DPSCs were analysed for morphology, proliferation potential, collagen formation, mineralization characteristics, and expression of the dentin-specific markers dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1), using immunohistochemistry. Results: DPSCs were positive for the mesenchymal stem cell markers STRO-1, CD44, and CD146, although two populations of cells showed different levels of STRO-1 expression. Differentiated DPSCs (dDPSCs) demonstrated a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase concentration between days 14 and 21, while a similar increase in collagen deposition, mineralization, and calcification was also observed on day 28. The proliferation rate of dDPSCs decreased with time. Odontoblast characteristics of dDPSCs were observed, with increased expression of the dentin-specific markers DSPP and DMP-1. Conclusions: This investigation demonstrated successful isolation of DPSCs and differentiation of DPSCs down an odontoblastic lineage, indicating that DPSCs represent a promising approval for the regeneration of lost dental tissues.

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