2 results for Thesis, Behavior in Bad Taste: The Association between Perceived Control and Intergroup Discrimination

  • Behavior in Bad Taste: The Association between Perceived Control and Intergroup Discrimination

    Hu, Qin (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Research concerned with understanding the motivational basis of intergroup discrimination has centred on the role of self-esteem. Decades of empirical research has, however, failed to find a consistent link between these two variables. As a result, a number of theorists have begun to postulate the potential contribution of other motivational factors. The present thesis sought to examine the association between perceived control and intergroup discrimination. The results of two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that New Zealanders who evaluated in-group members (i.e., New Zealanders) more positively than out-group members (i.e., Americans) reported an elevated sense of perceived control. Study 2 showed that New Zealanders with lower levels of perceived control (manipulated via ostracism feedback in a cyberball game), allocated more hot sauce to out-group (i.e., American) than in-group members (i.e., New Zealander). Furthermore, the differential allocation of hot sauce to in-group and out-group members amongst these participants functioned to restore their perceived control to pre-existing levels. In both studies, the relationship between control and each form of intergroup discrimination was not explained through other variables (i.e., self-esteem, social identification, belongingness and meaningful existence). Overall, such findings indicate that perceived control is likely to be a relevant factor in explaining intergroup discrimination. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation to the motivational basis of intergroup discrimination. The limitations and implications of studies are also outlined.

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  • Behavior in Bad Taste: The Association between Perceived Control and Intergroup Discrimination

    Hu, Qin (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Research concerned with understanding the motivational basis of intergroup discrimination has centred on the role of self-esteem. Decades of empirical research has, however, failed to find a consistent link between these two variables. As a result, a number of theorists have begun to postulate the potential contribution of other motivational factors. The present thesis sought to examine the association between perceived control and intergroup discrimination. The results of two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that New Zealanders who evaluated in-group members (i.e., New Zealanders) more positively than out-group members (i.e., Americans) reported an elevated sense of perceived control. Study 2 showed that New Zealanders with lower levels of perceived control (manipulated via ostracism feedback in a cyberball game), allocated more hot sauce to out-group (i.e., American) than in-group members (i.e., New Zealander). Furthermore, the differential allocation of hot sauce to in-group and out-group members amongst these participants functioned to restore their perceived control to pre-existing levels. In both studies, the relationship between control and each form of intergroup discrimination was not explained through other variables (i.e., self-esteem, social identification, belongingness and meaningful existence). Overall, such findings indicate that perceived control is likely to be a relevant factor in explaining intergroup discrimination. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation to the motivational basis of intergroup discrimination. The limitations and implications of studies are also outlined.

    View record details