23,249 results for Thesis

  • From subject to device, history as myth in action : the evolution of event from mythic processes as revealed in Waterfront Dispute fiction

    Matthewson, Claire C. (1986)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This analysis of selected New Zealand works defends the evolving function of history as fiction-material. It is intended to establish that purpose and treatment alter, as time further separates the writing and the event. The general change is one of development from subject to device properties. In tracing history's evolving role and treatment in fiction, analysis identifies history's eventual source - shown, in fiction, to be mythic and subjectively conceptual.

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  • Maori Education Policy In The New Millennium: Political Rationality & Government Mechanisms

    Tooley, Christopher W. R. (2000)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis explores the contemporary political rationality and government mechanisms that develop and impact upon educational policy for Maori. In engaging in a critique of political ideology and operational exposition, this thesis examines and discloses the mechanisms and rationalities of government in New Zealand through state policy theory, gender, race and ethnic writings, critical theory and theories of difference. Of significance to this work is the incorporation of Kaupapa Maori theory, which provides a traditional and contemporary insight into Maori views and praxis of emancipation. In realising the central interest and concern of Maori for real and effective intervention to address the crisis of schooling for Maori, analysis in this thesis examines the historical nature of Maori educational policy and critiques the contemporary educational political frameworks of the New Zealand Labour government. Furthermore, this research also examines government official’s perspectives in discussing the primary contemporary political mechanisms and rationalities that operate in controlling and developing educational policy for Maori. It is argued, that although these contemporary policy frameworks, rationalities and mechanisms may appear to be vastly different from historical colonisation and assimilation practices, they are informed by the same underlying structures and are intersected by similar tendencies and movements. In disclosing the perpetuating ethos of state Pakeha dominant interests and the absence of structural and cultural reform from within political educational policy development for Maori, this thesis argues that state initiatives in the new millennium, under the guise of transformation, commitment and hope still remain ineffective and oppressive for Maori.

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  • 'Seasonal allegory with Adam and Eve' by Leandro Basso

    Ellis, Kim Suzanne (1999)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Appendix of the work containing images is restricted due to copyright, but available by request, use the feedback form to request access. What does a single work of an artist reveal? What if this work is a piece of sixteenth century Italian art and now placed, or possibly displaced, into a New Zealand gallery? How does this work fit into this new environment, does it still tell a relevant story when the context has changed? In this dissertation I will seek to explore some of the issues implicit in one such painting, namely Leandro Bassano's Seasonal Allegory with Adam and Eve, in the Mackelvie Collection of the Auckland City Art Gallery. Created in a collaborative workshop environment, this one canvas holds a plurity of meanings both allegorical and biblical, acting as an example of the newly created biblical-pastoral genre. By examining the art historical context in which the work was painted and the genre created, along with some of the issues implicit in that, I hope to reveal its relevance, and enrich both the perception and understanding of this painting.

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  • Interaction of Yacht Sails in a Two-Dimensional Viscid Flow

    Norris, Stuart (1993)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cult Author versus Literary Celebrity: Commentary of and on Janet Frame and Margaret Atwood

    Cushen, AE (2011)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    'Cult Author versus Literary Celebrity: Commentary of and on Janet Frame and Margaret Atwood' is a comparative exploration of authorial commentary and the critical interaction with that commentary. The mythology that surrounds an author is a powerful force. It can affect and inform critical interpretations of their fiction. The way that authors participate in and attempt to shape their mythologies therefore has implications for the body of literary criticism that attaches to their work. This meta-critical study charts the nature and magnitude of the commentary produced by New Zealand author Janet Frame and Canadian author Margaret Atwood. It aims to investigate how each author has intervened as an active agent to mould the mythological discourse that surrounds them, and to examine the effect of each author's commentary by ascertaining where it has influenced overarching critical narratives of their work. The use of the authors' commentary as a critical tool is canvassed, as is critical reaction to the personae each author projects through their commentary.

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  • Hip Hop Dance in New Zealand: Philosophies, Practices and Issues

    Walker, Katherine (2012)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Hip hop dance has a long, interesting and often conflicting history. Hip hop dance forms have flourished in Aotearoa and have become a large part of the country’s youth culture. New Zealand has received world wide acclaim for the hip hop dancers and choreographers it is producing. As an experienced hip hop dancer, this research aimed to offer an informed inside view of the New Zealand hip hop dance community. It is hoped that this research will also provide a valuable resource for the New Zealand hip hop dance community and an opportunity to reflect its practice. This qualitative research placed value on the voices of the eight hip hop dancers who participated in the study. The study was driven by the question: What are the philosophies, practices, and issues that are informing hip hop dance in New Zealand? Through analysis of interviews and observations the data revealed dominant emerging themes and issues present in the hip hop dance community. For the hip hop dancers in New Zealand their culture is at a stage where it is deciding where to go; whether it should stay as a competition-driven youth practice, or mature into a diverse dance culture.

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  • The effect of continuous moderate intensity exercise training combined with high intensity interval training on cardiovascular disease risk factors

    Roxburgh, Brendon (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and type 2 diabetes are a major health and economic burden on society and without intervention, incidence will continue to increase. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is emerging as a time efficient strategy for improving risk factors of CVD and type 2 diabetes; however, there is a lack of research on HIIT in sedentary, at-risk individuals. Whilst HIIT has shown superior improvement in CVD risk factors, when compared with continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET), it may be unrealistic to exclusively adopt this form of training as a lifestyle change. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare how 12 weeks of HIIT and CMIET affected cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), insulin sensitivity and other risk factors for CVD, in sedentary individuals at moderate risk of CVD. METHODS: Twenty nine sedentary subjects at moderate risk of CVD were recruited for 12 weeks of exercise training. Subjects were randomised into three groups: HIIT (n=9; 8-12 x 60 sec at 100% VO2max, 150 sec active recovery), CMIET (n=10; 30 min at 45-60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R)) and a sedentary control group (n=10). Participants in the HIIT group performed a single weekly bout of HIIT and four weekly sessions of CMIET, whilst the CMIET group performed five weekly CMIET sessions. Cardiorespiratory fitness, insulin sensitivity (HOMA model), blood lipids, body composition and quality of life were measured pre and post intervention. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were determined to assess the likelihood that the true value of the effect represented substantial change. RESULTS: Relative VO2max increased by 10.1% in in the HIIT group (32.7 ± 9.2 to 36.0 ± 11.5 mL·kg-1·min-1) and 3.9% in the CMIET group (33.2 ± 4.0 to 34.5 ± 6.1 mL·kg-1·min-1), whilst there was a 5.7% decrease in the control group (30.0 ± 4.6 to 28.3 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1). It was ‘unclear’ if a clinically significant difference existed between the HIIT and CMIET groups. There was a decrease in insulin sensitivity for both exercising groups (HIIT: 101 ± 27.3 to 90.3 ± 29.0%; CMIET: 95.6 ± 42.6 to 84.1 ± 25.6%), with a ‘possibly trivial’ clinical inference between groups. CONCLUSION: Both exercising groups showed clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max, body composition (hip and waist circumference), systolic and diastolic blood pressure and total and LDL cholesterol. However, it remains ‘unclear’ whether one type of exercise training regimen elicits a superior CVD risk factor reduction relative to its counterpart.

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  • Three-year-old visual artists: Their interactions during art making

    Plows, Julie (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The perspectives of mental health practitioners working with Chinese migrants in relation to mental health service delivery and accessibility

    Xu, Jing (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study develops the research question: the perspectives of mental health practitioners working with Chinese migrants in relation to mental health service delivery and accessibility. The study draws the attention of practitioners to Chinese people, who consist of one of the minor ethnic groups in New Zealand, and provides an opportunity for practitioners to reflect on their current cross-cultural practice. Many previous studies have focused on the barriers that prevent Chinese migrants accessing mainstream mental health services. This study is particularly interested in the perspectives of mental health practitioners towards Chinese migrants as service users. Ten participants were recruited and attended individual one-hour, semi-structured interviews. The main concepts and themes drawn from the interview transcripts are presented in the findings. The migration journey is a significant life transition for Chinese migrants, which brings a lot of changes. The lower utilization rates of Chinese people in mental health care are associated with many factors, such as socio-demographic backgrounds and culturally related factors such as shame and discrimination, different perceptions of mental health/illness, and use of traditional Chinese medicine. These attitudes and behaviours of Chinese migrants towards mainstream mental health services are rooted in traditional Chinese culture and differ from those of the host society. Filial piety, as one of the significant concepts of Confucianism, provides us with new perspectives in understanding the help-seeking behaviours of Chinese people. This study has involved ten mental health practitioners, seven of whom are social workers, with specialized knowledge, skills, years of experience and capabilities for working with Chinese people. Participants have here reflected on the strengths, and challenges and the limitations involved in working with Chinese people. Some recommendations have been outlined for improvements in future mental health practice involving Chinese people.

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  • Illustrious Visitors in New Zealand 1880s–1930s

    Burgess, Jonathan (2014)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Numerous famous individuals travelled to New Zealand in the period from the 1880s to the 1930s. Their names have previously lent celebrity endorsement to the promotion of New Zealand tourism and the twentieth-century historical project to define a unique national identity. This thesis contextualizes some of these recognizable names and faces by placing them into the transnational circuits that brought them to New Zealand. It addresses three groups of mainly male visitors to New Zealand from the 1880s to the 1930s: political commentators, itinerant lecturers, and wealthy fishermen. Partly due to the promotional efforts of these visitors, New Zealand has acquired the international reputation of being a ‘social laboratory’ at the turn of the twentieth century, a tourist destination in the early twentieth century, and a millionaires’ playground in the interwar period. Re-situating these privileged individuals in their contemporary networks and communities demonstrates ways in which these national and nationalistic images were generated, and the limits of their application to understanding New Zealand’s past. The personal relationships that created and nurtured the networks that allowed individuals to lead transnational lives in this period are also explored, and this thesis argues that New Zealanders actively participated in these transnational circuits of politics, entertainment, and sport. If we view history in national isolation we lose sight of the sustained connections New Zealand and New Zealanders had with the world throughout these decades. It is not enough to simply theorize transnational connections; transnational networks must be populated. Peopling these transnational networks of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century with the familiar names that helped constituted them enriches our view of New Zealand in this period.

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  • 'Riria te riri, mahia te mahi’: The Politics and Development of Modern Māori Activism, 1968-78

    McDowell, Tiopira (2007)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study discusses the origins, development and outcomes of the first wave of radical Māori activism between 1968 and 1978. It charts the events of the period and the body of politics, philosophies and strategies employed by Māori activists. It contends that the discipline of history as currently practised becomes problematic when it is applied to the study of non-western cultures, and that scholars undertaking research into Māori histories and communities need to develop a model or metaphor for writing history which is sympathetic to Māori epistemologies and priorities. To this end the text focuses primarily on the words and actions of the activists themselves in order to better understand the way activists conceptualized their world. Activists’ ideas and politics should not just be studied in a ‘race relations model’, that is, in terms of their impact on society and the Pākehā public, and the reaction of the government. Taking activism out of the race relations model and examining it on its own terms throws the movement’s concerns, subtleties and contradictions into sharper relief and provides a deeper understanding of its significance. The thesis is centrally concerned with how activists defined themselves, their actions and their politics, and will argue that Māori activism was implicated in the era’s emerging politics of identity. Māori activism was as much about reforming Māori and Pākehā attitudes towards Māori culture, society and identity as it was about policy and legislative reform. Furthermore, the thesis attempts to explain the influence on, and contribution to, the activist movement of three interrelated contexts: te Ao Māori, the Māori world, Aotearoa, national events, and te Ao Hurihuri, the international setting. It also pays special attention to the gender politics of the era. The work is divided into four chapters. The first covers the Māori world and the ‘big three’ issues of Māori activism: the Treaty of Waitangi, land loss and cultural alienation. The second chapter discusses the national context and the ‘big three’ issues of national politics during the era: apartheid sport, the Vietnam War and class politics. The third chapter deals with the international framework and the influence of global trends on local events, while the fourth chapter details the emergence of the Black women’s movement.

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  • A Hybrid Geometric Approach For Document Clustering And Measuring Similarity Level Among Documents

    Heidarian, Arash (2015)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The increasing numbers of textual documents from diverse sources such as different websites (e.g. social networks, news, magazines, blogs and medical recommendation websites), publications and articles, medical prescriptions leads to massive amounts of daily complex data. This phenomenon has caused many researchers to focus on analysing the content and measuring the similarities among the documents and texts to cluster them. One popular method to measure the similarity between documents is to represent the terms within the documents as vectors and measure the similarity among them based on the angle or Euclidean distance between each pair. By only considering these two criteria for similarity measurement, we may miss important underlying similarities in this area. We propose a new method, TS-SS, to measure the similarity level among documents, in such a way that one hopes to better understand which documents are more (or less) similar. This similarity level can be used as a handy measure for clustering and recommendation systems for documents. Our study gives insights on the drawbacks of geometrical and non-geometrical similarity measures and provides a novel method to combine the other geometric criteria into a method to measure the similarity level among documents from new prospective. We apply Euclidean distance, Cosine similarity and our new method on four labelled datasets. Finally we report how these three geometrical similarity measures perform in terms of similarity level and clustering purity using four evaluation techniques. The evaluations' results show that our new model outperforms the other measures.

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  • The Sparse Fourier Transform

    Laity, Joel (2016)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Some functions can be well approximated by taking their Fourier transforms and discarding the terms that have small Fourier coefficients. The sparse Fourier transform is an algorithm that computes such an approximation more efficiently than computing the entire Fourier transform. The sparse Fourier transform has many applications to problems in mathematics and engineering. For example, in mathematics the sparse Fourier transform can be used to solve the chosen multiplier hidden number problem. In engineering, the sparse Fourier transform can be used to compress audio or video data. In Chapter 3 we present an algorithm that computes the sparse Fourier transform. This algorithm generalises and unifies the sparse fast Fourier transforms in [19] and [21]. These algorithms are of particular importance as they are the earliest algorithms for computing the sparse Fourier transform. The final chapter develops a method for reducing the problem of calculating the sparse Fourier transform over Zn to calculating it over Z₂k where k is the smallest integer such that ns algorithm for factoring integers.

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  • An integrated social-cognitive model for predicting exercise compliance among patients with a cardiac diagnosis

    Maddison, Ralph (2000)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether Maddux’s (1993) integrated social cognitive model of health behaviour could predict compliance and intention to exercise among patients with a cardiac diagnosis. Forty-one participants (29 male and 12 female— mean age of 63 SD ±9 .81 years) with documented cardiac disease enrolled in an 18-week, supervised walking-based exercise programme. Participants completed scales (e.g., intention, self-efficacy, barrier efficacy, outcome expectancy, outcome value and perceived social norm) related to Maddux’s model at the beginning of the programme (phase I) and again at weeks six (phase II) and twelve (phase III). In addition, compliance behaviour was assessed through daily attendance and exercise energy expenditure measures—via Metabolic Equivalents (MET) calculations (ACSM guidelines, 1995). Insofar as exercise behaviour is concerned, results showed that during phase I barrier efficacy and intention frequency were significant predictors of attendance behaviour (adjusted R2 = .26) and outcome expectancy added an additional 14.3%. Intention frequency predicted energy expenditure (adjusted R2 = .19) and outcome value contributed an additional 10%. Results also showed that during phase II intention frequency and time significantly predicted attendance behaviour (adjusted R2 = .38). Intention frequency and time also predicted energy expenditure (phase II, adjusted R2 = .26). For phase III attendance was significantly predicted by barrier efficacy and intention frequency (adjusted R2 = .56). Insofar as intention is concerned, results showed that self-efficacy and outcome expectancy significantly predicted intention intensity in phase I (adjusted R2 = .43) whereas selfefficacy alone predicted intention intensity in phase II (adjusted R2 = .25). In phase III self-efficacy and outcome value significantly predicted intention intensity (adjusted R2 = .43). Using Baron and Kenny’s (1986) suggestion for testing mediation results showed no evidence to support the notion that intention might mediate relations between self-efficacy and exercise behaviour. In addition, a significant difference was found between compliers versus dropouts on the social-cognitive variables at phase I. Specifically those participants that dropped out of the programme had higher outcome expectancy (i.e., vulnerability and severity towards current behaviour) than compliers. Finally, a cross lag correlation design showed that the direction of relations was strongest for exercise behaviour leading to the social-cognitive variables. These results, taken in concert, provide partial support for Maddux’s model. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

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  • Vegetation colonisation of Rangitoto Island : the role of crevice microclimate

    Whiting, Diana (1986)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes an investigation to characterize both the crevice microclimate and flora on Rangitoto Island, and to illustrate the role crevices play in vegetation colonisation of the raw lava flows. This was achieved by extensive micrometerological and botanical surveys combined with detailed study of seed fall, seedling establishment and survivorship in the lava fields, Based on these findings, a series of laboratory investigations examined the dispersal and germination of seed, and early seedling establishment, growth and survival of principal crevice pioneer species. The microclimate of the bare lava flow surface is characterised by extremely high temperatures and lack of moisture. It appears the only possible site of summer-spring survival and successful colonisation in open area of the lava apron is the temperature moderated, water economical crevice. Once a canopy of vegetation develops this restriction is reduced. Of the crevice flora, only 8 species appear able to act as open flow pioneers. Details examination of two of these species (M. excelsa and O. furfuracea) revealed a diversity of successful pioneer strategies in terms of reproduction and early stages of the life cycle.

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  • Mainstreaming legal research skills into a New Zealand law school curriculum

    Russell, Mary-Rose (2006)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    In any jurisdiction the body of law grows exponentially: new cases decided, new legislation passed, new areas of law being opened up. The inherent complexity of New Zealand’s common law heritage is compounded by an increasing internationalisation of its law via treaties and conventions. Globalisation within the legal publishing world has expanded the range and type of legal material which is now accessible. Developments in delivery media, especially digitisation, have enabled more immediate access to unlimited amounts of information. Concurrent with these facets of our knowledge-economy, there are new expectations in both the tertiary educational and legal environments for graduating students to have skill-sets which have not been the traditional focus of law schools. Additionally, the law schools themselves are under both internal and external pressure to develop their curricula for reasons as diverse as revenue-generation for the university to narrow profession-centric demands. All these factors impact directly on the teaching and learning of legal research skills within the New Zealand law curriculum. Legal research skills programmes within the main common law jurisdictions have been the subject of an extensive body of literature from the late-1970s. The discourse has touched on all relevant issues including why such programmes should be taught, what their content should be, who should teach them, and when they should be taught. But for the most part, the discourse has focused on the ineffectiveness of programmes which have been taught. This thesis investigates how legal research skills may be effectively and sustainably mainstreamed within the New Zealand law curriculum. Two principal methods, expository analysis and empirical research, are used in this study. The law curriculum is viewed within its historical and current context. Methodologies which have traditionally been employed in the teaching of legal research skills are discussed, and rationales for their seemingly systemic ineffectiveness highlighted and explained. Empirical research was undertaken examining attitudes towards the teaching of legal research skills within three distinct populations: New Zealand legal academics, a cohort of summer clerks working in national law firms during the summer of 2003-4, and national law firm library managers. The results of this research are detailed and analysed. Finally, a model programme, and methodology for mainstreaming legal research skills into a New Zealand law curriculum is proposed.

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  • Teaching Children with Autism in Regular Classrooms: A Delphi Investigation of Necessary Knowledge for Teachers.

    Schiff, Averil (2008)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Autism is a developmental disorder with a current prevalence rate of 1:150 in the United States. As children with disabilities are now commonly taught within regular education classrooms for at least part of their school day, regular classroom teachers are charged with teaching children with autism who present a number of challenges unique to the disorder. A review of the research shows that regular teachers feel ill equipped to adequately educate these children, and that the advice and training available to teachers is often vague or conflicts with the empirical evidence regarding effective methods for educating children with autism. In order to address this problem, this study employed the Delphi method to identify necessary knowledge of autism for regular classroom teachers. The Delphi method uses a series of iterative surveys to solicit the opinions of a group of experts concerning a particular topic and aims to reach a group consensus. Board Certified Behavior Analysts were selected as the participants in this study as Applied Behavior Analysis interventions have been shown through research to be the most effective means for teaching children with autism. One hundred and one suggestions were made by the participants in six areas of knowledge: the nature of autism, the specific child that is to be included in the teacher’s classroom, Applied Behavior Analysis, other interventions and teaching strategies, working with others, and other training and knowledge. Seventy-three items within these categories reached consensus to be of at least moderately-high importance to teachers’ knowledge. Of those, the participants voted that teachers should be able to demonstrate practical application of 33 of the items. The items that did, and did not, reach consensus on level of importance in terms of teacher knowledge are considered in light of existing research and available teacher training. The results of this study highlight the necessity of teacher training in empirically validated methods for educating children with autism. The specific recommendations of the participants in this study may be considered in the development of teacher training curricula.

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  • Hope pukerane: a study of religious sites in Roviana, New Georgia, Solomon Islands

    Nagaoka, Takuya (1999)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis focuses on religious sites, one of the poorly explored fields in Melanesian archaeology, in the Solomon Islands. The study is conducted at two scales of analysis: the whole Solomon Islands and the Roviana region of the New Georgia group. At the broader scale, the variability of religious sites in the Solomon Islands is investigated to examine the nature of their diversity. Depending on the degree of similarity among religious sites, it is possible to delineate four levels of cultural areas: language area, major island, interaction system, and island group. Three mechanisms, origin, interaction, and internal differentiation, functioned differently at each level to create this cultural pattern. Their comparison, including cultural and linguistic information surrounding sites, provides a fruitful result. Based on the field data, religious sites in Roviana are analyzed along two dimensions: typology and spatial patterning. The typological analysis illustrates a temporal change in shrine form and content during the 15th century; available radiocarbon dates and ethnohistoric information suggest an early type of shrine was constructed from at least 1300 AD to 1400 AD and the later type shrines were built from 1400 AD to the turn of this century. Spatial data of religious sites is analyzed at three scales: micro, semimacro, and macro level. At each level, different mechanisms were involved in the spatial organization. Further, the function of two types of religious sites in each period is explored with the help of ethnohistoric and ethnographic information. A dynamic transformation in the religious system, which is manifested in the change in the shrine assemblage, is interpreted as part of a socio-political change after the coastal dispersal of inland groups in the late prehistoric period. This study demonstrates religious sites provide useful information to shed light on socio-political and ideological aspects of past society. Key words: archaeology, religious site, Solomon Islands, typology, spatial analysis, sociopolitical transformation

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  • Geology of Waiheke Island

    Nicholson, Heather (1953)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Waiheke Island, the largest of the group of islands lying to the east of Auckland City, is 12 miles long from east to west, and in width varies from 2/5 mile to 6 miles. The island has an area of 36 square miles'and its coastline is approximately 83 miles long. The port of Matiatia at the western end is 12 miles east of Auckland City, and the eastern end is about 15 miles from Coromandel. To the south east lie the smaller islands of Pakatoa, Rotoroa, Ponui and Pakihi: to the west and north lie Motuihi, Rangitoto, Motutapu, Rakino and The Noisies.

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  • "The name of father has ceased to exist": incest, patriarchy and kingship in the Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri, Book VIII of the Confessio amantis and Pericles.

    Greenland, Joanna M. (2010)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis examines three texts – the Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri, Book VIII of Gower’s Confessio Amantis, and Shakespeare’s Pericles – which tell a single story, the story of Apollonius of Tyre. The earliest text, the Latin Historia, is the major source for Gower’s version of the story, which is in turn the main source for Pericles. Using the Historia as the basis for my initial observations, I then look at the ways in which Gower made use of and adapted the Historia and how Shakespeare then adapted Gower’s text. I employ a variety of methods in examining the texts, including considering the historical background behind the Confessio Amantis and Pericles, and making use of a psychoanalytical approach, considering the texts in the light of both Oedipal theory and ‘seduction theory’. The themes which emerged as concerns for the three authors were incest, patriarchy and kingship. These themes can be found in all three works, but the importance of each theme and the way in which it is handled varies greatly amongst the three. The Historia places the least emphasis on these themes overall: it condemns incest and patriarchal excesses, but it does not dwell on these issues or question the institutions of its society. Gower does question the validity of the patriarchal social structure, by concentrating on the evils of father-daughter incest and by giving the women in his tale more control over decision-making. He also emphasizes the need for the rule of law, rather than tyrannical kingship. Incest is a major theme in Pericles, but the play is less concerned with issues around patriarchy. Instead, Pericles devotes more time to considering the role of kingship.

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