22,929 results for Thesis

  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Customary international law in National Courts: a comparative analysis

    Bottermann, Uwe (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    88 leaves :maps (1 in pocket) plates ; 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 83-88. University of Otago department: Law. "October 2000"

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  • Conservation genetics of island takahe (Porphyrio mantelli)

    Lettink, Marieke (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    ii, 66 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. A research report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Diploma in Wildlife Management. University of Otago department: Zoology. University of Otago Wildlife Management Report; no. 96.

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  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • "Too much 'yellow' in the melting pot?" : perceptions of the New Zealand Chinese, 1930-1960.

    Law, Penelope (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    i, 65 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 61-65). Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Habitats and macroinvertebrate fauna of the reef-top of Rarotonga, Cook Islands : implications for fisheries and conservation management

    Drumm, Darrin Jared (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 173, [6] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science. "December 2004."

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  • A city in transition : diversification in the social life of Dunedin, 1860-1864.

    McCarthy, M. P. (1977)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 133 leaves :ill., facsim. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 128-133.

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  • Fighting fit? A study of the Army's medical examinations, 1916-1918.

    Callon, Lynette (1980)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 57 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. map ; 30 cm.

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  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

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  • Communicating New Zealand's Organic Certification

    Barbalich, Gerard (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    As the New Zealand organics industry continues to grow, a unified message would aid consumer understanding and branding. Currently, certification is producer-focused, while consumers express confusion surrounding organic products and the associated benefits. This thesis argues that current organic certification schemes should be altered through: (i) aligning marketing strategies under the scientifically validated environmental benefits of organic products, and (ii) implementing strategies that are line with the dialogue model of science communication. While the domestic and international organic markets for organic products are growing, international studies show consumer confusion – especially relating to organic labelling (Henryks & Pearson, 2011). The communication of current certification schemes is ill suited to communicate the benefit of organic products and manage the branding of organic products. Implementing the proposed changes will aid an industry that was worth an estimated $215-$225m in exports during 2012, and $126-$133m domestically (Cooper et al., 2013). Strengthening the communication of organic certification in New Zealand will (i) improve the brand performance of organic certifiers and producers, and (ii) improve national branding (Dinnie, 2008). In addition to the academic component, an informally styled story explores the production chain of an organically produced sheep (this story comprises the creative component and draws upon poetic licence). It explores several issues and perceptions of organic products, including: sustainability, environmental protection, and human health.

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  • Malagan ritual art on Tabar, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

    Gunn, Michael J (1992)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Malagan ritual art traditions of New Ireland have long been of interest to Western anthropologists, but have not before been considered in terms relevant to the New Irelanders themselves. This thesis documents the malagan ritual art traditions of Tabar, a group of three islands off the coast of New Ireland which is acknowledged as the traditional source of malagan, and analyses malagan through the terms of reference which were specified by the Tabar Islanders as part of condition for undertaking fieldwork. Two series of ritual ceremonies are described, a mortuary series and a commemorative series. Over 450 malagan descriptions within twenty two subtraditions have been recorded and are documented in an accompanying appendix. The social and cultural connections of malagan are described and analysed, then the indigenous taxonomic structure malagan is described and analysed. A new understanding of the nature of these subtraditions has resulted from this study.

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  • Open population capture-recapture models and diabetes in Otago

    Cameron, Claire (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 207 leaves :ill., ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

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  • SMA-raloxifene for the management of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Pritchard, Tara Cheree (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has a poor prognosis, and these tumours are refractory to conventional androgen deprivation therapy. In addition to androgen, oestrogen alone or combined with androgen induces abnormal growth and neoplastic transformation of the prostate, therefore, providing a secondary target. The selective oestrogen receptor modulator raloxifene elicits disease stabilisation in a small number of CRPC patients, and the encapsulation of raloxifene into a styrene copoly(maleic acid) micelle (SMA-raloxifene) shows the potential to improve its efficacy. Further investigation in the current study determined the greater in vitro cytotoxicity of SMA-raloxifene (5 μM) is a result of the higher intracellular internalisation compared to the free drug. This resulted in a 75% higher intracellular raloxifene concentration after 48 h in PC-3 cells. Additionally, raloxifene (10 μM) elicited a reduction in phosphorylation of proteins involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration including Met, Akt, FAK, and Src to 29, 14, 17, and 45% of control expression, respectively, as evaluated by western blot. SMA-raloxifene elicited an even greater reduction in Met and Akt phosphorylation, reducing expression to 1 and 5% of control, respectively. The efficacy of SMA-raloxifene was then examined in a CRPC xenograft model with the hypothesis that the micelle would accumulate and be retained within the tumour for longer as a result of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Male SCID mice (7-8 weeks) were subcutaneously implanted with PC-3 cells (1 x 106) bilaterally into the lower flank, and randomly allocated into treatment groups (n=8). Mice were treated weekly for 4 weeks via intravenous tail vein injection with the vehicle control, 1 or 5 mg/kg of free raloxifene, or 1 mg/kg of SMA-raloxifene. At the end of the treatment period, mice treated with 1 mg/kg of free raloxifene exhibited a reduction in tumour progression by 20%, and an equivalent dose of SMA-raloxifene reduced progression by 39%. 1 mg/kg of SMA-raloxifene reduced tumour progression equivalently to a dose of free raloxifene 5-fold higher (i.e. 5 mg/kg). Despite this reduction in tumour progression, treatment did not induce disease stabilisation. A biodistribution study was then conducted in a CRPC xenograft model as described above. It was concluded that SMA-raloxifene (5 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the retention of raloxifene within the tumour compared to the free drug, resulting in 69% higher intratumoural raloxifene concentration 24 h post-injection. This is likely to be a result of the higher internalisation of drug as demonstrated in vitro, as well as an increased stability and reduced metabolism of the drug within micelles. Overall, SMA-raloxifene significantly improved the drug’s efficacy towards CRPC cells in vitro and in vivo; however, optimisation of SMA-raloxifene is required to further potentiate treatment efficacy for the management of CRPC.

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  • Care ethics and brain injury

    Butler, Mary (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    It is generally supposed that a supportive family can have an influence on outcomes for an adult with severe brain injury, but there is very little known about what effective families actually do. In this research the families of five such individuals were involved in an ethnographic project that lasted for one year. The literature review brought together insights from brain injury, care ethics, disability studies and anthropology. These insights were combined with a process of reflective equilibrium that was applied to the ethnographic material in order to determine the ethics of the carers. Ethics of care in this setting was conceived of as a positive practice ethic, rather than as a series of negative conundrums posed by the brain injury. The practice ethic shared by carers meant that they all conceived of the need created by brain injury in humanistic terms, rather than in terms of pathology. Carers demonstrated virtues appropriate to their practice as they helped the adult with brain injury to connect with aspects of ordinary life. The best outcomes for the adult with brain injury included being able to engage in productive activity and to make a place in the world. These outcomes could only be achieved with due regard for their safety and subsistence. The practice ethic of carers was demonstrated in the skills and concern that ensured a satisfactory outcome for the adult with brain injury. This research is a departure from recent research about families affected by brain injury, which has focused on the burden involved in care. An examination of what carers achieve suggests that burden may be associated with the development of caring practice. The transformative capacity of care, for both the carer and the adult with brain injury, is emphasized. However contextual factors, such as adequate compensation, are connected to the capacity of the carer to engage in good practice and these are explored also in this thesis. In particular, relevant aspects of the relationship between families and the Accident Compensation Corporation are explored.

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  • An exploration of Maori health state preferences

    Perkins, Matthew R V (2000)

    Thesis
    University of Otago

    The allocation of publicly funded resources in the health sector via Cost Utility Analysis requires preferences for different health states to be known. While preferences for New Zealanders as a whole have been elicited, the possibility of different preferences among Maori remain. This research explores this possibility as well as looking at what Maori perceive as health and draws conclusions from these findings relating to priority setting and resource allocation in the health sector. Using the EQ-5D (a generic health state classification system) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) preferences were elicited for a sample of 64 Maori from three main groups in a face-to-face interview style setting. An additional five participants were involved in a post questionnaire interview to try and gain greater understanding of the process involved in the questionnaire completion. Data from participants was scaled according to conventional procedures with full health and "dead" anchored at 1 and 0 respectively and other valuations interpolated and extrapolated appropriately. Statistical tests comparing the mean values of each health state from the current sample to both Maori and non-Maori from a New Zealand wide postal survey were then undertaken. The health state preferences for the Maori group were found to be very similar to both the Maori and non-Maori from the previous research. Unfortunately the vast majority of participants neglected to place the health state "dead" on the VAS meaning that their valuations were unable to be scaled and included in the majority of the analysis. Qualitative data from both the questionnaire and the interviews suggest that there is more to health than as described in the questionnaire but this is not Maori specific and related equally to non-Maori, The lack of difference in preferences implies that it does not matter whose valuations are used in priority setting as the end result will be the same. Further research would be beneficial to investigate why the state "dead" was omitted from being valued. Also, a larger sample of Maori would be useful to provide stronger conclusions than the limited ones drawn here as a result of the low number of participants valuing "dead".

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  • Generation X’ers’ values and how they perceive the New Zealand labour market

    Lavender, Erin (2000-07)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    My research was based around skilled Generation X employees and what they value in long-term employment relationships. Initially my research was looking at employee retention in organisations, I began an initial literature review on this topic but was swamped with information and found that I would need to narrow my research. One area that was not well understood in the literature was employee retention methods for different age groups. This prompted me to look at Generation X and what they value in employment relationships, as away to understand how to better suit their needs and hopefully illustrate the ways in which they can be retained. I also believed that understanding the New Zealand labour market and illustrating how things like the brain drain, the new psychological contact, and the idea of mobile careers maybe having an affect on organisations and individuals was important and may in some way could be tied to Generation X'ers values in employment relationships. I began my research with a literature review on what Generation X employees are said to value in employment relationships, the main themes that were illustrated by the literature were such things as feedback, training and development, balanced lifestlyes, and fun. I also reviewed literature on issues I thought were relevant to the New Zealand labour Market including the brain drain, the new psychological contract and the notion of mobile careers Once my literature review was complete I established a number of questions I wished to find answers to including: 1. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers are pertinent issues to managing/retaining Generation X? 2. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers exists in the context of the New Zealand labour market? 3. What effect do they perceive these things have on the New Zealand labour market? 4. Do these things affect them personally? 5. What do graduate Generation X workers value in long-term employment relationships? 6. Do these Generation X employees perceive the organisation they work for as being able to understand their values?

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  • Understanding and Improving Stroke Recovery for Māori and Their Whānau

    Harwood, Matire Louise Ngarongoa (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis sought to understand ethnic disparities in stroke within Aotearoa, New Zealand, from the perspectives of Māori. Stroke burden is greatest for Māori, the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, who have higher rates and worse outcomes compared with non-Māori. Importantly for Māori with stroke, the disparity in outcomes (including dependence and quality of life) compared with New Zealand Europeans increases significantly in the 12 months after being discharged from hospital into the community. Reasons for this are not clear. The study’s aims were twofold—to provide a deeper understanding of the stroke experience for Māori with stroke and their Whānau; and to design interventions that could potentially improve stroke outcomes. A qualitative approach to the research was taken in order to gain an understanding of people’s experience, attitudes and beliefs. Constructivist grounded theory was utilized to ensure a wider focus on societal influences. The project also involved Māori as researcher and researched and sought to make a positive difference for Māori with stroke and their Whānau. These concepts fit within the Kaupapa Māori research framework which also guided the research. Five themes explaining the stroke experience were constructed from data collected from in-depth interviews with 18 Māori with stroke and nine people who identified themselves as Whānau caring for Māori with stroke. Personal context, optimal stroke care, Whānau wellbeing, a stand against discrimination and taking charge occur in isolation, or combine, to influence stroke recovery or Māori with stroke and their Whānau. The five themes were presented to three key stakeholder focus groups of Māori with stroke, Whānau of Māori with stroke, and stroke funders and providers. Two practical interventions were proposed by the groups: a DVD of role models and a person- and Whānau-centred assessment designed to engage the patient and their family in the process of recovery. This research suggests that inequity of indigenous health and rehabilitation outcomes in stroke requires a comprehensive and multi-faceted response. A stroke strategy that achieves the aspirations of Māori to take charge is required.

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  • Creating and sustaining an “effective” rural school: The critical triad – leadership, curriculum, and community

    Wright, Anne (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines the professional practices of rural school principals in the province of Otago, New Zealand, to describe what it is about their practices that creates and maintains effective rural schools. The underlying question for this research was, The leadership and management of effective, small, rural schools appears to pose unique problems and issues from that in larger rural and urban schools. What makes that difference? A mixed methods approach was taken, using a survey designed for the study and administered to 63 principals of rural schools in Otago. Observations of six purposively chosen principals representing a large rural school (with a role of 150 or above) and a small rural school (with a role of 60 or below) from each of the three areas of Otago: Coastal (East), South Otago, and Central Otago; and, interviews with the six principals who were observed. The survey was factor analysed and showed strong psychometric properties. It yielded background and demographic information regarding the sample, their perceptions regarding their ideals for their schools as compared to the actual situations in their schools, and their views on developing a local curriculum and the factors that made an effective rural school. The survey informed the following observation schedules and questions for the interviews, which were conducted with 6 principals chosen to represent a cross section of types of rural schools. Main findings from the study were that context mattered – small rural school leadership was shown to be different from that in large rural schools, and that for small rural schools, a local curriculum using the local community and environment for content was essential. The results are discussed in terms of the implications they have for the profession and the future training of rural educationalists, and how the results both relate to the literature, and extend the current knowledge base about rural schools.

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  • Communicative mobility and networked mediation in transnational lifeworlds: a case study of European expatriates in Australia

    Deffner, Florian (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Transnational lifeworlds of expatriates raise exciting questions on the use and meaning of media. Network communication, and its increased communicative connectivity, allows for a borderless communicative mobility which transforms experience and meaning by multiplying and diversifying content choices and ways of interpersonal communication. To capture the mediated transformations of expatriates’ lifeworlds, this dissertation introduces the term “networked mediation” as a descriptor for new forms of mediation emerging in the context of network communication. In the micro-perspective of the lifeworld, networked mediation comprises all forms of mediation—including their interrelation—that do not exclusively correspond to traditional ‘streamings’ of mediation, such as the strict patterns of consecutive and distinct consumptions of news in the mass media age. Therefore, networked mediation, as a multi-directional and multi-dimensional form of mediation, appears to constitute new ontological dimensions of subjective experience and meaning. The construction of more complex meaningfully lived-through mediated social realities and relations are investigated through a social-phenomenological approach illuminating the transnational communicative spaces of European expatriates in Melbourne. Results reveal new mobility cultures of communication characterized by network-based communicative internalization and communicative subjectivization. Consequently, in the case of expatriates’ transnational lifeworlds, even more complex forms of networked mediation occur as they display communicative orientations to 'dual' lifeworld attachments between home and host country. Seen from this angle, the exploration of networked mediation not only illustrates and clarifies transnational communicative spaces, but also sheds light on the complex dimensions and dynamics of contemporary cultures of mediation.

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