22,929 results for Thesis

  • Gold Rush and Gold Mining: A Technological Analysis Of Gabriel's Gully and the Blue Spur, 1861-1891

    MacArthur, Nicol Allan (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Philip Ross May stated in 1980 that well-informed studies of the technology of gold rushes and gold mining were long overdue but very little has been added to the historiography since then. As a result, various misconceptions and misunderstandings have entered into the New Zealand and wider gold rush historiography. A conflation of gold rushing with gold mining is sometimes evident and another misconception entrenches corporate structure with the level of capitalisation and mixes the mining of alluvial and quartz reef gold. On May’s lines, this thesis argues that technology lies at the heart of all gold rushes and their gold mining, and seeks simply to demonstrate that the technology of gold rushes was different from the technology of gold mining. The thesis first completes a historical survey of gold rushes from sixteenth century Spanish America until Victoria in the 1850s. It then then closely evaluates the technology of the Gabriel's Gully gold rush and its extension to mining the Blue Spur deposit, both as local history and also to deepen the findings of the global review. All gold rushes were found to use a common suite of hand tools and simple manual methods of low productivity. This manual simplicity was diagnostic as was a slow- down in gold output and modifications in methods as the rich easy gold became exhausted. To continue required either hydraulic or mechanical methods, or large coordinated labour forces, along with capital expenditure. This signified mining, which typically comprised ground sluicing, hydraulicking, deep leading, or river mining. Unlike other rushes, the Gabriel's Gully rush used hydraulic energy in long toms and box sluices, as well as manual cradling, to wash the paydirt. Whether due to this or not, a remarkable new finding is that in its first twenty-one months, the Tuapeka district produced more gold than the first twenty-one months of the Californian rush. Regarding mining, Blue Spur proved to be an extremely large orebody, much of it heavily cemented and capable of high gold contents. Over its long fifty-year life, as different zones were reached, alluvial, quarrying, and underground mining and stamp milling technologies were applied, and culminated in hydraulicking and the innovative hydraulic elevating developed in Gabriel's Gully. However, regardless of the mining technology in use, there was no structural change in the Blue Spur mining parties for twenty years, although each new technology required higher capitalisation. This supports Hearn’s work on the Tinkers goldfield. This technological study has perhaps filled a gap in the local historiography, and historians of the Otago gold rushes and gold mining may be encouraged to pursue other lines of enquiry with the role of technology included in their perspective. This leads to a wider point that ongoing mining histories in New Zealand could look to the characteristics of local deposits and their required technology before generalising across different types of gold deposit nationally. The work shows also that Otago had a significant role in the global innovations in alluvial mining technology of the nineteenth century.

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  • Open market share repurchases in New Zealand

    Henderson, George (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    When a firm repurchases its own common stock, it buys back a proportion of its own equity from existing shareholders. For open market transactions the stock is acquired at market value and in an efficient market the transfer should not change shareholders' wealth. However, empirically, such corporate activity in American markets is generally associated with stock price increases and, consequently, increases in remaining shareholder wealth. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of open market share repurchases on the share price of New Zealand firms. If any abnormal returns are identified then the hypotheses suggested by American studies will be investigated to see which, if any, hold for the New Zealand case.

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  • A comparison of IPOs from small and medium sized enterprises: China vs Australia

    Ze, Tian (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The general market behaviour of unseasoned new issues of Chinese A-shares and Australian common stock at the time of first day trading on respective stock exchanges is investigated, presenting a time-series analysis of the monthly volume and average initial returns on initial public offerings over a certain period of time. Also, the correlation of volume and underpricing among different groups of companies according to their size is studied. The underpricing of new stock issue defined as initial returns is widespread. The scale is extreme, especially on both the Shanghai Securities Exchange (SHSE) and Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) of China. The percentage of IPOs for small and medium sized enterprises is increasing in China and decreasing in Australia on average during the period presented in this paper. The results show that there is no significant difference in size between the companies listed on SHSE and SZSE in terms of total asset or revenue.

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  • A curriculum for e-Business education

    Tham, Wai Loong (2000-12)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This is a digital copy of the thesis that is stored on an accompanying CDRom. It is not a full and exact duplicate of the print version of the thesis

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  • The history of the early gold discoveries in the Province of Otago, 1851-1863.

    Jefcoate, Harold Oliver (1922)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Bibliography missing.

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  • Women in New Zealand industry : with special reference to factory industry and to conditions in Dunedin.

    Unwin, Diana Mary (1944)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    85 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 81-85. (Typescript)

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  • Cataclastic Processes within the Alpine Fault Zone

    Scott, Hannah Rosaline (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan of Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department.

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  • Accord and satisfaction by way of full settlement cheque

    Currie, Simon Colin (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 225 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "November 4, 2007". University of Otago department: Law.

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  • The Southland province of New Zealand in the days of Dr. J.A.R. Menzies (Superintendent, 1861-1864).

    Dreaver, A. R. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    59 leaves, [25] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 25 cm.

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  • Ethel Benjamin, New Zealand's first woman lawyer.

    Brown, Carol (1985)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    139 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: l.136-139. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The Blackwater mine, Waiuta, N.Z.

    Graham, Archibald (1946)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 109 leaves :ill., facsims., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 104-109. University of Otago : Otago School of Mines

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  • The New Zealand returned services' association. 1916-1943

    Mayhew, William Richardson (1943)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 53 leaves :maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. (Typescript)

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  • Public perceptions, gang "reality" and the influence of the media : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology

    Green, Alexandra (1997)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This research was designed to address the hypothesis that there is a wide disparity between how the public perceive gangs and the 'reality' from the gang's perspective and; that in part, the New Zealand media are responsible for this difference, portraying a negative image of gang members. Sixty members of the Horowhenua public and seven gang respondents were interviewed. The small sample size of the gang respondents made it impossible to statistically compare the two groups. Analysis was carried out on the spoken discourse of the public and gang respondents and the printed discourse of the news media. Chi square analysis was used on the public respondent sample. Demographic characteristics of the public respondents such as gender, ethnicity and employment status resulted in observable differences in the public's perceptions of gangs. In particular, feelings of having a gang resident in their neighbourhood, estimates on the number of people involved with gangs in New Zealand and perceptions of the media accuracy in reporting about gangs. Previous contact with a member of a gang was also found to influence respondents' perceptions of media accuracy. Increasing the sample size is likely to clarify these findings. Ethical and practical implications in conducting research on gangs are discussed and suggestions for future research are identified. Some practical implications of the present findings are mentioned.

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  • Te mahi kaipaipa i waenganui i nga tamahine Maori : nga ahuatanga e pa ana ki enei tawaitanga = Young Maori women and smoking : knowledge, attitudes, initiation and maintenance : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Orbell, Claire Rachel (1995)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Cigarette smoking leads to many of the most harmful diseases of our time. The prevalence of smoking is excessively high amongst young Maori women. Most research has focused on knowledge of the health consequences associated with smoking, and attitudes toward cigarette smoking. Teaching individuals of the health consequences of smoking and attempting to change individuals' assumed positive attitudes toward smoking have been the basis for smoking prevention and cessation programmes Recent research suggests these programmes are ineffective in preventing or eliminating smoking. The process of initiation into cigarette smoking is not well understood. Also, the maintenance of cigarette smoking after initiation is not well understood. This is a mixed method study with young Maori women participants. The study includes both smokers and non-smokers. Non-smokers are almost always excluded from research into smoking but are a valuable source of information on smoking. A quantitative methodology was employed and a questionnaire developed to investigate young Maori women's knowledge and attitudes toward cigarette smoking. A qualitative methodology was used and a semi-structured interview developed to explore young Maori women's thoughts, feelings and experiences of initiation and maintenance of cigarette smoking. The aims of this study are to assess participants' knowledge of the health consequences of smoking and participants' attitudes toward smoking. The study also explores participants thoughts, feelings and experiences of smoking with an emphasis on the initiation and maintenance of smoking behaviour. Results indicate participants possess good knowledge of the health consequences of smoking. Participants were found to possess negative attitudes toward smoking. However, smokers were found to have more positive attitudes toward smoking than non-smokers. These findings are consistent with previous research. Results also indicate that social factors play the greatest role in both initiation and maintenance of smoking in young Maori women. Recommendations for future research and practical suggestions for prevention and cessation programmes are made.

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  • Living in the city ain't so bad : cultural diversity of South Auckland rangatahi : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of a Masters of Philosophy in Psychology

    Borell, Belinda (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Establishing a 'secure' Maori identity based solely on particular criteria of Maori culture (te reo Maori, tikanga, marae, etc.) continues to be problematic for some Maori. Those who are not seen as connected in this way are often defined by what they are seen as lacking, hence terms such as disconnected, distanced, detached and dissociated. Although young Maori may define themselves in terms of difference from others there is an increasing danger of some urban youth being defined as different from Maori who are 'culturally connected' and for this to be seen primarily as a negative demarcation. Although it may be the aspiration of some to have greater cultural connection, what this means for different groups and individuals may have both congruence and divergence with what are usually considered to be markers of cultural inclusion. This thesis presents the findings from a wider research project funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand. The project objective was to gather data that can inform and contribute to existing knowledge about cultural identity of rangatahi Maori with a view to establishing a framework(s) for greater youth development and a more positive and embracing perspective of culture. Kaupapa Maori and social constructionist framings are used to centre the focused life story interviews that were conducted with young people aged between 13-21 years, who identified as Maori and lived in the South Auckland area. Findings suggest that conventional and experiential indicators of Maori identity as well as a strong localised identity are key factors in this exploration. Challenges for identity theorists, societal institutions and other Maori are discussed.

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  • New Zealand television : what are the benefits of state ownership of television in a commercial world? : the public service broadcasting debate continues -- : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Social Sciences) in Media Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Wyatt, John (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Faced with the possible sale of our free-to-air state broadcaster Television New Zealand to overseas media interests, this thesis argues a firm case against sale, and sets out to create further public interest and comment. Television is valuable more for its programme content than its ability to raise revenue. Starting with the premise that television has a unique role as a mass communications medium in creating social reality, discussion centres on how ideas of cultural identity, democracy, sovereignty, and national identity are articulated and supported through locally-made, creative and diverse programming; and how this is strengthened in having the state broadcaster take a leading part in setting a high standard in the service provided. The tensions created by economic globalisation of media products are examined, especially in relation to how small nation-states such as New Zealand encounter a deterritorialisation of social identity arising through rapid technological advances and media processes which ignore national state and cultural boundaries. The origin of state television in New Zealand is documented, particular emphasis being given to legislative control, financial performance and the effect that organisational structure has on the content, diversity and standard of programmes scheduled. Maximising the financial performance of TVNZ through saturation advertising is questioned, and the recent polarising debate by politicians, commentators, and the public on the merits or otherwise of state ownership of TVNZ is covered in detail. A comprehensive study of the ABC and SBS in Australia is included, which informs an alternative proposal for TVNZ based on significant restructuring. This thesis concludes TVNZ should be retained in government ownership, but with TV1 guided by a charter which moves its prime function away from commercial imperatives. TV1 should concentrate on developing a broadcasting service dedicated to programmes which contribute a sense of national identity, and which reflect the cultural diversity and aspirations of all New Zealanders. To assist in these goals TV1 would be publicly funded to provide daily primetime ad-free 'windows' used to schedule programmes in line with its charter. TV2, and a range of industry mechanisms, would be used to ameliorate the ratio of tax-payer funding.

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  • 'Large letter'd as with thundering shout' : an analysis of typographic posters advertising emigration to New Zealand 1839 - 1875 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Visual and Material Culture, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Thomas, Patricia Ann (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis examines the role of ephemeral, typographic material in the promotion of emigration to New Zealand in the nineteenth century. It focuses on the advertising posters produced by the New Zealand Company, the Otago and Canterbury Associations, the provincial governments and Government of New Zealand. It aims to identify how advertising and typography contributed to the transfer of the promotion message from the producer to the audience in this specific historical context. For the first time a comprehensive data set of emigration posters of this period has been gathered together and examined. The posters are analysed in the context of their contemporary visual, material and print cultures, with particular reference to ephemeral printing. To account for all the historical, textual and graphic properties of the posters, the thesis develops and applies a novel, multilayered system of analysis, drawing on communication theory, social semiotic principles and Gestalt principles of composition. The posters afforded emigration promoters a visual medium for distributing audienceappropriate messages through typographic strategies. They provided promoters with the facility for fast and inexpensive messaging that was otherwise unavailable in nineteenth century communication. The thesis concludes that posters were a significant part of an early, coherent and systematic advertising campaign which utilised processes and persuasive tools that have traditionally been seen as emergent only in the late nineteenth century. This thesis establishes the value of ephemeral material and the study of graphic language when applied to the examination of historical phenomena. As well as shedding new light on these particular forms of historical design and modes of communication, it also adds a further valuable dimension to the more well-known story of nineteenth century emigration promotion by focussing on its graphic and advertising languages rather than its pictorial aspects. The investigation undertaken provides a new analytical system through which a combination of historical, ephemeral, typographic and advertising material can be examined in the future.

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  • Healthful housing : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Sociology at Massey University

    Lynch, Kathleen (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study researched the housing needs of incipiently homeless low-income households in Auckland. In particular it examined how the compromises and sacrifices low-income households must make to procure housing jeopardises their ability to promote and maintain health. Health within this study was defined holisticly including physical, mental, spiritual and family aspects as well as the dimension of ontological security. The participants were comprised of three groups: housing workers, community health workers, and most importantly the households in housing need. All participants were or had been connected with Monte Cecilia Emergency House. The role of the state, past and present, in assisting low-income households to obtain accommodation was examined. Particular consideration was given to changes which have occurred in the lost-cost rental sector through the move to market-level rents for state housing, and the introduction of a targeted, abatable accommodation allowance. The participants' stories demonstrated an increasing and serious level of unaffordability of rental housing. This had brought about both immediate and long-term detriments to health due to living in over-crowded accommodation and / or a residual post-rent income insufficient to maintain an adequate standard of living. Tangata Whenua and Tagata Pasifika were disproportionately affected by unaffordable housing. The need for a return to income-related state housing was high-lighted. Recommendation was also made regarding the urgent need of a comprehensive survey of housing need, both urban and rural.

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  • Structural, tectonic and climatic control of the fluvial geomorphology of the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge

    Fair, Eileen Eleanor (1968)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The Manawatu River is one of the major rivers of the North Is1and of New Zealand, draining a catchment of 2,296 square miles. The river is over 120 miles long and is one of the few rivers in the world to rise on one side on an axial mountain range, flow through the range and enter the sea on the opposite side. (See Fig.1.) The Manawatu River, rising on the eastern flanks of the Ruahine Range flows south to the 'Dannevirke Depression' (Lillie, 1953, 89) where it Joins the northeastwards-flowing Mangahao, Mangatainoka and Tiraumea Rivers. These rivers with catchments on the eastern side of the Tararua-Ruahine Range, drain an elongated basin which extends from north of Dannevirke to south of Eketahuna. They join the Manawatu River in the Dannevirke Depression then flow westwards across the Tararua-Ruahine Range in the Manawatu Gorge to the Kairanga alluvial plain. Although only one-third of the river's catchment lies to the west of the axial range, the river here has an attenuated course of 63 miles, a little more than half its total length. Between February and April 1967 the writer completed a preliminary study of the terraces along the Manawatu River, between the Manawatu Gorge and the river mouth at Foxton. Investigations revealed that the best terrace development existed on the ten miles between the Gorge and Palmerston North whereas, in the lower reaches, terrace development is limited by prevalence of flooding, the swampy nature of the terrain and the progradation of the coastline. The unstable sand dunes of the coastal belt have also masked most of the terrace series in the lower reaches of the river.

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  • Direct and correlated responses to selection for high or low ultrasonic backfat depth in Southdown sheep : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Animal Science at Massey University

    Ramirez, Jose Solis (1988)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Divergent selection was employed to establish high and low lines for liveweight-adjusted backfat depth (LABF) assessed ultrasonically in Southdown sheep. The selection lines were initially constituted from several sources with stock brought-in during the first three years of the experiment (1976-1978). These first years were used to evaluate ultrasonic equipment for measuring backfat depth. The lines were closed in 1979. Data analysed in this study were collected over 8 years (1979-1986) representing, approximately 2.66 generations. Selection was practised in two stages, with a preliminary selection based on the first LABF on the rams and ewes, and a final selection based on an average of all measurements assessed throughout the year for the rams only. Direct selection for high or low backfat depth resulted in the 1986 born animals in the high line having about 1.69mm (59.6%DEV) and 2.00mm (49.57%DEV) thicker backfat than the low line in the rams and the ewes, respectively. The responses to selection per unit of cumulated selection differential were in most cases high. Due to prior selection and difficulties in assessing the selection pressure, it was concluded that these regressions poorly represented the selection process. Correlated responses to selection for and against backfat depth were generally small. However, consistent positive correlated response were observed in liveweight-adjusted height and length (LAH and LAL) over the selection period. These responses imply a negative genetic correlation between these traits and backfat depth . This finding was in agreement with the published literature. Phenotypic correlations were calculated within-trait between-days and between-traits within-days. Correlations were pooled within-trait following tests of homogeneity. The within trait values were generally moderate to high and they were in agreement with the values reported in the literature. The between-traits correlation values were generally low, but were consistently negative for LABF-LAH and LABF-LAL, and consistently positive for LAL-LAH . Repeatability estimates, using the within-trait combinations, were also in agreement with the literature and suggested a moderate to high repeatability for LABF and LAH. Repeatability estimates for LAL were low to moderate and they were slightly smaller than the values reported in the literature. Estimates of the heritability of LABF varied with method used. The paternal half-sib method resulted in low values (0.14 to 0.19) while dam/offspring method gave moderate values (0.29 to 0.43) . Corresponding heritability estimates for LAH and LAL were about 0.31 and -0.14, respectively. These values were smaller than other results quoted in the literature. It was concluded that truncation selection on LABF reduced the genetic variability of these traits, although not to the same extent as for LABF. It was concluded that divergent selection for LABF was effective, resulting in lines with significantly different backfat depth at the same liveweight. Furthermore, selection for low LABF led to significantly longer and taller animals.

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