43 results for Unclassified, Share

  • Waikato 2011 centile charts for assessment of time to run 550m [Microsoft Excel workbook]

    Rush, Elaine; Obolonkin, Victor

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    Centile charts show the position of a measurement compared to a reference population. They are useful for comparing measurements that change with growth and time for an individual or a group. The time to run 550 m was measured as the time taken to run five times around an oval track (26.5m by 42.5m). We have developed gender-specific time to run 550m centile charts from measurements of 5059 children aged 6 to 12 years. The calculations that underpin the graphical representation of these charts have been embedded in the attached excel spreadsheet. For a child, or group of children of the same gender the age and run time in years, minutes and seconds may be entered in the unprotected cells and the point will be plotted on the gender-specific chart and the z score determined. For example for a group of 6 year old girls the median age will be 6.5 years and the median run time of the group may be entered. In this way changes in run time over time may be assessed or different children and groups compared with and without intervention and accounting for gender and age.

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  • Energy Behaviour of SMEs in New Zealand

    Walton, Sara (2015-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    ©  2015  The  Author  

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  • National Household Survey of Energy and Transportation: Energy Cultures Two

    Wooliscroft, Ben (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Executive Summary Key findings: • A clear picture of the state of the energy efficiency of our housing stock, our household energy behaviours and our driving (and transport) behaviours has been collected. • Four clear clusters of energy consumers are identified: – The Energy Comfortable (23.7%) have less remedial (e.g. dehumidifier) energy use. They live in warm dry houses. – The Energy Poor (21.1%) not only have the lowest incomes, they also have the lowest number of energy efficiency household modifications and practise the least number of energy saving driving behaviours. – The Energy Average (24.6%) are exactly that, exceptional in very few attributes. There are significant opportunities for them to save energy. – The Energy Efficient (24.3%) earn a similar amount to the Energy Average and the Energy Comfortable but have power bills similar to the Energy Poor. • New Zealand’s housing stock is frequently not adequately insulated or efficiently heated • Many New Zealanders do not practise energy saving behaviours around the house, including behaviour as simple as turning off lights in un-occupied rooms. This research gives insight into the frequency with which behaviours are practised. • There is considerable opportunity to save money through efficient driving (most estimates are 15%) however many efficient driving behaviours are not practised by our sample. • The earthquake in Christchurch is clearly found in the results with regard to heating, transportation and traffic issues. • Poor energy behaviour in the house is strongly related to poor driving (from an energy point of view) and a low energy efficient house. • The results would suggest that a systems approach to improving energy consumption will reap the best rewards.

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  • PV in Blueskin: Drivers, barriers and enablers of uptake of household photovoltaic systems in the Blueskin communities, Otago, New Zealand

    King, Geoff; Stephenson, Janet; Ford, Rebecca (2014-10)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

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  • New Zealand’s future transport system: drivers of change. Initial report from the NZ Delphi study.

    Stephenson, Janet; Hopkins, Debbie; McCarthy, Alaric (2014-12)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    A workstream of the Energy Cultures research programme Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago http://energycultures.org

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  • Energy Cultures 2: Data Mining: Trends in Household and Business Energy Use

    Williams, John (2014-10-01)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    A workstream of the Energy Cultures research programme Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago http://energycultures.org

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  • High Risks for Fiji Divers in Pacific Documentary 'Disturbing'

    Milligan, C

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a report from the Pacific International Documentary Festival 2016, held in Tahiti in January/February 2016. It discusses the festival and focuses on how documentary can draw attention to political issues in the Pacific, centring on the film 'Les Salaires des Profondeurs', a film which shows the lives and suffering of deep-sea divers working in Fiji. http://asiapacificreport.nz/2016/03/06/high-risks-for-fiji-fishermen-in-pacific-documentary-disturbing

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  • Chaos to Capability : Educating Professionals for the 21st Century

    Hays, Jay (2015-10-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Built on two decades of research, thought, writing, and teaching, in Chaos to Capability: Educating Professionals for the 21st Century, Hays argues that a transformation in higher education teaching and learning is crucial and possible. Convincing evidence indicates that conventional university education inadequately equips graduates for the complexity, contention, and contestability they will confront upon entry into their professional careers and pressing needs locally and globally for initiative and self-direction, creativity, and collaboration. This monograph explores these insufficiencies, presents a core set of capabilities and dispositions required of professionals in the 21st Century—a curriculum for the modern age—and discusses practical issues and implications with respect to implementation. Topics addressed include (1) educating for uncertainty and unknowability, (2) the vicious-cycle, unanticipated consequences of conventional approaches to education, (3) the requisite paradigm shifts and role transitions in teaching and learning, (4) unlearning, threshold concepts, and transformational learning, and (5) the paradoxical nature of chaos and its contribution to capability-building. Key contributions include models of the learning continuum, with its portrayal of and distinctions between learning backward and learning forward, and the cube, which depicts the intersection of capabilities, dispositions, and discipline-specific knowledge and skill. Hays concludes by claiming that the attributes, meta-abilities, and dispositions catalogued in Chaos to Capability comprise a "curriculum for the unknown", the requisite repertoire of professionals and professional practice for the new millennium global world. This curriculum is attained, he suggests, not by greater quantity of content, but of more encompassing, holistic, and authentic design and delivery. Guidance provided on how to do this may help educators develop programmes more in keeping with realities of the 21st Century.

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  • “Cool” Asia in a local context : East Asian popular culture in a New Zealand classroom

    Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The central issue is not only what can every discipline learn from popular culture, but also how can popular culture become a successful tool of learning for different disciplines. The fact that it is such an attractive tool of learning for students does not make it easier to answer the question of what we, as teachers of popular culture, want our students to learn and understand when we use this powerful tool in our classroom. The course East Meets West was introduced in 2003 as a part of a suite of ‘global electives’ for all students enrolled in degree level programmes, e.g. Marketing, Business Management, Sports Management, Communication Studies etc at Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand. However, the majority taking the course were Bachelor of Arts [BA] students majoring in Japanese, Chinese or European languages. Some students were choosing to study Asian languages and, first of all, Japanese language to satisfy their obsession with East Asian popular culture. Japanese popular culture certainly played a key role, but interest in popular culture from other East Asian countries was equally present. Since 2010 the majority of students enrolled in this course were students enrolled in Communication Studies. Similarly to the BA students, their interest in this course was equally determined by their previous engagement with East Asian popular culture. The aim of the course has been to explore the influence of East Asian popular culture on the Western popular culture. The main emphasis was on visual popular culture, e.g. anime, film, advertising or street fashion. However, other genres or types of popular culture were also considered.

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  • The migrant and the media : maintaining cultural identity through ethnic media

    Noronha, Sandra; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Evidence shows that mainstream media in New Zealand does not fully address the communication needs of these ethnic groups nor does it represent them in a balanced way (Robie, 2009). This is where ethnic, migrant, diaspora media play an important and supporting role by providing an alternative to an increasingly homogenised mainstream media. For ethnic communities, access to such media gives them an avenue to understand more clearly issues affecting their community, a stronger sense of identity and social cohesion and a connection to a perceived transnational community. While there is an increasing concern that mainstream media fails to reflect migrant issues and concerns, a plethora of migrant media exists in parallel that helps fill this gap (Williamson and DeSouza, 2006). Auckland alone has a vibrant ethnic media scene with media spread across print, radio, and web. Its strong Pacific Islands population, for instance, has created a lively media scene with a strong radio and online media presence contributing to the creation of a distinctive cultural diasporic identity (Papoutsaki and Strickland, 2008). With this background, this essay explores the function of different migrant media in New Zealand drawing examples from across the board with a particular focus on Indian media. This includes traditional media (i.e. print, TV, magazine, and radio), and online media. In this, the traditional communication networks of ethnic community and religious associations and their use of web, films and events is also taken into consideration. By exploring the role, challenges and potential of ethnic media, this essay seeks to understand how these media represent the diverse voices of migrant groups, in addition to providing content relevant to their needs as migrants (i.e. content that counterbalances the mainstream host culture as it is represented in the mainstream media).

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  • Race, racism in everyday communication in Aotearoa / New Zealand

    Revell, Elisabeth; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay is based on theories of ‘new racism’, which explain how race and racism continue to play an integral role in our lives, but in subtle and often hidden ways. This approach informs the discussion in this essay that focuses on some of the issues that emerged from a critical collaborative autoethnographic project that explored how race is manifested in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. The discussion, more specifically, draws on what we call here ‘conversational tact’ and its three sub-themes of ‘everyday racialised ethnic terms’, ‘the everyday racialised use of ethnic stereotypes’, and ‘everyday censorship and silence around race in conversation’. These themes have been chosen as the focus of this essay because they sit together under a larger theme that looks at the way in which people communicate race through their everyday patterns of speech and vocabulary in New Zealand and help us unmask ‘racial micro aggressions’ (DeAngelis, 2009; Sue et al, 2007).

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  • Communicating social change : politics and immigrants

    Cruickshank, Prue (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Immigration is a complex, dynamic global phenomenon which impacts irrevocably on both immigrants and the receiving society. Immigration policies, reflecting governments’ political and economic intentions, significantly influence successful immigration and settlement. Immigrants’ success in meeting governments’ and their own expectations are influenced by the political, economic, regulatory and social conditions of the host society they enter. Developing communication strategies to prepare a population for a change in immigration policies would be advantageous for social cohesion. However, the introduction of radical economic change intended to restructure business and society at the same time was not conducive to smooth, social immigrant integration. This paper explores the communication dimensions of an immigration policy set within the context of national political and economic restructuring. It does this by tracing the process and impact of the introduction of neo-liberal policies on New Zealand society without prior political debate. The economic and social consequences of neo-liberal reforms affected the reception and opportunities encountered by newly arrived business immigrants. To contextualise the discussion, the effects of neo-liberal policies on the New Zealand economy and society, including its immigrant communities, are traced from their inception in the 1980s through the 1990s. Introducing an economic and political change process which enables people to connect and participate, requires leaders who can articulate a vision to persuade people it is in their best interests to incorporate the change (Shockly-Zalabak, 2009). An opportunity for political debate on the impending neo-liberal changes arose during the 1994 New Zealand election campaign but was deliberately ignored (Jesson, 1999). An unexplained change in the social contract potentially creates a sense of betrayal and unfocused anger (D’Aprix, 1996). Subsequently, as the neo-liberal structural reforms were introduced, communities reacted in confusion, anger and scepticism.

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  • Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand : a collection of research essays

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This edited volume introduces highlights of the academic interests and research activities of a number of staff at Unitec’s Department of Communication Studies, demonstrating the breadth and scope of the engagement of this academic collective with contemporary communication issues. Edited by Giles Dodson and Evangelia Papoutsaki, it is clear from the work that communication in Aotearoa New Zealand remains complex and continually under negotiation, as this country continues to be formed and reformed by processes of cultural encounter, by political and institutional change and by voices seeking to assert, to contest and to claim their presence – to represent and to be represented within contemporary New Zealand.

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  • Introduction : representation and voice in a complex communication environment

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Representation is, of course, a central analytical concept with media, communication and cultural inquiry. The centrality of representation – of expression, mediation, institutional form and cultural negotiation - to issues of public debate and engagement, the quality of our media and to the measure of human agency and of our institutions is a notion that grounds our research and inquiry at Unitec. Representation is a central foundation of our research strategy and a central theme of this collection. A parallel interest and sensitivity to the place of voice within contemporary communicative practices provides a second foundational concept for our research activities. With an interest in voice we are focusing our attention on individuals, agencies and institutions and processes of ‘self’ and ‘collective’ representation that voicing implies, particularly in response to experiences or conditions of marginality (Couldry, 2010). Here, voice is understood as capacity and agency, in as much as it implies the communicative or representational act itself. Likewise, representation is an important way in which our voice can be heard. We feel strongly that how voices are intervening from the margins within contemporary New Zealand is a centrally important dynamic to be analysed and understood. We feel our Department is strongly placed to make significant contributions in this area and this collection stakes this claim.

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  • Moving forward, keeping the past in front of us : Treaty settlements, conservation co-governance and communication.

    Dodson, Giles (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    At present there is well-established recognition in New Zealand of Māori and the Crown as constitutional partners to the Treaty of Waitangi1 and commitment to partnership is widely articulated in official and public discourses. This essay addresses the current issue of how developments in Treaty policy and new institutions arising from settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims can inform the development of institutions of co-governance within national conservation policy. This discussion is contexualised by an examination of currently evolving marine conservation policy. The essay argues that communication, as a discipline conventionally outside policy – especially science dominated conservation policy – has much to offer policymakers as we seek to understand best practice partnership and co-governance arrangements emerging from Treaty settlements.

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  • Repositioning the oral history interview : reciprocal peer interviewing within a transgenerational frame

    Donaghey, Sara (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay signals a departure from conventional models for the oral history interview to allow the participant voices to occupy a position of greater prominence in a collaborative process of co-creation. Reciprocal peer interviewing is an adaptation of focus group interviews; a technique that positions the narrators at the forefront of the interview process whilst the researcher takes on a secondary role as facilitator and observer. My research applies the reciprocal peer interview technique to explorations of lesbian identity and life experiences through oral testimony within a transgenerational frame. The interview lies at the heart of oral history; an intensely personal activity that provides recorded information in oral form (Fyfe and Manson, 2006). Indeed, analogies to dramatic representations are common in the literature, describing the interview as a performance during which two people interact across multiple channels of reception and transmission. Traditional interview modes place the researcher/interviewer at the forefront, engaging in an interrogatory dialogue with the narrator/interviewee. Despite an uneasy relationship with historians who at times, have viewed oral history as populist, partial and selective, one may argue that the recording of a life story is no different to an interview used as a mainstream data collection instrument in qualitative research commonly applied in the social sciences. Ultimately, one must adhere to the raison d’etre for historical study as stated by Thompson (1978, p 21) that “all history depends ultimately upon its social purpose.”

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  • Thesis review : the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand

    Henson, Donna (2015-11-17)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the second of the Theses Review series Dr Donna Henson reviews the work of Elizabeth Revell. ‘This thesis presents an interesting and thoughtful autoethnographic inquiry into the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. An uncommon choice of both topic and method in the local communication disciplinary context, Revell presents a partial collaborative autoethnographic approach to the study that entails the reflexive analysis of qualitative data drawn from solicited participant diaries, semi-structured interviews and focus groups.’

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  • Press, politics and people in Papua New Guinea 1950-1975

    Cass, Philip (2014-05-29)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    [PNG] newspapers show an expatriate population expressing attitudes that were often at variance with official policy and out of sympathy with the needs of the indigenous population. It sometimes shows us what the indigenous population thought and did, but just as often their omission from the pages of the daily or weekly press leaves us to draw our own conclusions. From this we can trace an outline, at least of the changing relationship between the sinabada and the haus meri and the taubada and the haus boi. (The fact that an expatriate couple might be addressed as sinabada and taubada in Papua, but as masta and missis in New Guinea did not change the fact that the meri and haus boi remained just that.) Relationships between expatriates and indigenes did change in the period covered by this book; indeed a seismic shift in power, in attitudes and in relationships between expatriate and indigenous people occurred during these two decades. This book draws on the commercial and church press - and, to a certain extent, official and mission publications - to draw a picture of how those changes occurred and what they meant to the country. The press can be a valuable source for historians, not just as a first draft of history, but as a means of understanding the day to day lives of citizens and their concerns. This is particularly true when a newspaper serves a small community. Stuart’s history of Port Moresby, for instance, is all the better because he uses the Papuan Courier to show what the expatriate community was doing and thinking. In the current narrative the Rabaul Times will serve as just such a mirror of a small expatriate population. The press also provides valuable insights into particular episodes and processes as well as broad historical periods. The Post-Courier provides an example of a paper which reported on local stories that often had national significance in a time of unprecedented social and political change in the Territory. Wantok provides us, across a five year period, the application of the media to promote health, education, human development and national identity.

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  • The Moveable Feast Collective Teach Design

    Jowsey, Susan (2014-11-20)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this new eMedia project is to review aspects of the decision making with regards to teaching design and the pedagogical framework employed. Moveable Feast attempted a complex cross disciplinary research based project that encompassed two disciplines and incorporated seventy students drawn from both the first and second years of a three year Design and Visual Arts degree. The Graphic Design staff members lead by Susan Jowsey sought to create a controlled live-learning experience for their students; the city of Christchurch became the case study for this project

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  • The Participation of Women Employed in Traditionally Male Dominated Occupations including Plumbing: 1975 – 2013

    Cruickshank, Garry (2015-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Author Garry Cruickshank investigates the gender gap in New Zealand’s plumbing profession. Having established that the proportion of female plumbers is almost unchanged since 1975, Cruickshank compares this information with data gathered from other trades and exposes the widespread nature of this trend across traditionally male dominated industries. The author reflects on what could to be done to alter this situation.

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