33 results for Unclassified, 2008

  • Minding our ps and qs: Issues of property, provenance, quantity and quality in institutional repositories

    White, Bruce (2008)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The development of institutional repositories has opened the path to the mass availability of peer-reviewed scholarly information and the extension of information democracy to the academic domain. A secondary space of free-to-all documents has begun to parallel the hitherto-closed world of journal publishing and many publishers have consented to the inclusion of copyrighted documents in digital repositories, although frequently specifying that a version other than the formally-published one be used. This paper will conceptually examine the complex interplay of rights, permissions and versions between publishers and repositories, focussing on the New Zealand situation and the challenges faced by university repositories in recruiting high-quality peer-reviewed documents for the open access domain. A brief statistical snapshot of the appearance of material from significant publishers in repositories will be used to gauge the progress that has been made towards broadening information availability. The paper will also look at the importance of harvesting and dissemination, in particular the role of Google Scholar in bringing research information within reach of ordinary internet users. The importance of accuracy, authority, provenance and transparency in the presentation of research-based information and the important role that librarians can and should play in optimising the open research discovery experience will be emphasised.

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  • Closing the gaps: Maori and information literacy

    Lilley, Spencer C (2008-01-30T03:09:42Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at User Education for User Empowerment: Commonwealth Library Association Conference 19 – 20 October 2000 Christchurch, New Zealand.

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  • Indigenous intellectual and cultural property rights

    Lilley, Spencer C (2008-01-30T22:17:12Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at the 8th Asia-Pacific Specials, Health and Law Librarians Conference 22-26 August 1999 Hobart, Tasmania

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  • The (un)happiness of knowledge and the knowledge of (un)happiness: Happiness research and policies for knowledge-based economies

    Engelbrecht, Hans-Juergen (2008-02-03T20:17:36Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented to the International Conference Policies for Happiness, June 14-17, 2007, Certosa di Pontignano, University of Siena, Italy.

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  • A longitudinal study of mastitis on an experimental farm with two herds, one managed organically, the other conventionally.

    Petrovski, Kiro (2008)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Mastitis in two herds managed as a comparison between organic and conventional dairy farming systems was monitored for 4 years utilising regular bacterial culture of milk samples, individual and bulk somatic cell counts and observation by farm staff. The objective was to develop strategies for the control of mastitis in organic cows without the use of antibiotics. The herds showed differences in clinical mastitis incidence, subclinical mastitis prevalence and bulk milk somatic cell count. Despite these differences, the level of mastitis in the organic herd remained manageable.

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  • Takemusu Aiki: Insights into Optimizing Ideational Flow

    Bradford, Mark (2008-07-21)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The Fourth Art of Management and Organization Conference, Banff, Canada, 9-12 August 2008

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  • Issues in equivalence: Information literacy and the distance student

    Lamond, Heather; White, Bruce (2008)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Information Literacy is a recognised lifelong learning skill, and an expected graduate attribute. With the growth in distance provision of tertiary education it is important to acknowledge the barriers faced by distance students and the difficulties libraries face in delivering equivalent learning opportunities to students who are physically isolated from their institution. This paper outlines the importance of information literacy, the major barriers faced by distance students and makes suggestions as to how institutions and their libraries can better meet their learning needs.

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  • Aurora Leadership Institutes: Assisting future leaders to maximise their leadership skills and potential

    Lilley, Spencer C (2008-01-30T02:45:37Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Oceans of Opportunities: Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa 2003 Conference, 7 – 10 October 2003 Napier, New Zealand

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  • Ki te Ao Marama, Ki te Ao Matauranga: Into the world of light, into the world of information

    Lilley, Spencer C; Field, Sheeanda (2008-01-30T22:33:38Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Inform, Connect, Engage: Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa 2005 Conference, 11-14 September 2005, Christchurch, New Zealand

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  • Reflections on professional training: A post-Auroran view

    Lilley, Spencer C (2008-01-30T22:44:38Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Capitalising on Knowledge: Australian Library and Information Association 2000 Conference, 23 – 26 October 2000 Canberra, ACT

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  • Comedy, pain and nonsense at the Red Moon Cafe: The Little Tramp's death by service work in Modern Times

    Sayers, Janet; Monin, Nanette (2008-01-31T02:46:43Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at the Art of Management Conference, 2004, Paris

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  • He wharemoa te rakau, ka mahue. Maori engagement with local government: Knowledge, experiences and recommendations

    Cheyne, Christine M.; Tawhai, Veronica M. (2008-01-31T20:37:01Z)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This report presents the data, analysis and results of focus group research that explored Máori knowledge, experiences and perspectives of local government in Aotearoa New Zealand. Seven focus groups were held with different groups of Máori; 18 – 24 year olds in tertiary study; 18 – 24 year olds in the workforce; people 25 years old and over residing in rural areas, and people 25 years old and over living in urban settings. The purpose of this report is to present the research findings about the knowledge and experiences of Máori in relation to local government, and in particular, their recommendations for the development of the local government sector. It is intended to assist local authorities in their efforts to improve their engagement with Máori, and stimulate further research with Máori about Máori participation in local government decision-making.

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  • Urban reprogramming at Sunnynook: Can a landscape strategy for an urban design project provide satisfactory planning direction for a local body?

    Griffiths, Pete (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Centre plans, analysis documents, and urban renewal documents, appear on council’s shelves and archives under many names. An examination of the contents page, in these documents, reveals a seemingly full and rigorous analytical study of existing site conditions has been carried out, but on closer inspection some areas of weaknesses are revealed. For example, often an analysis of the open space or parks and reserve networks are undertaken, which consist of a list of these areas…and that’s all. This project aims to make a thorough investigation into the open green spaces that populate the immediate vicinity of the Sunnynook town centre, with the aim of providing some initial concepts for the reprogramming of Sunnynook town centre. This reprogramming will be entirely driven by the inherent potentials of the ecological diversity of the open green spaces. An acknowledgement is made at this point that other important factors such as social conditions, economic and political factors, and other necessary components of the site have been sidelined in order to focus entirely on the potentials of the ecological diversity mentioned earlier.

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  • Case study : United States

    Benseman, John; Comings, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As with many other OECD countries, the United States of America (U.S.) estimated the literacy skills of its adult population as part of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS). The U.S. published the results of its National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), which employed what became the English version of the IALS test, in 1994 (citation1), and then published the results of a second estimate in 2006 after the completion of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), which employed the same test. The NAAL (citation2) changed the familiar five levels of skill identified in the IALS to four levels, labelled below basic, basic, intermediate, and proficient. In addition, it dropped several million adults from the sample because they could not answer any of the test questions. The score range in below basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 1, and the score range in basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 2. Though the reporting of NAAL levels is different, any particular score on the NAAL is equivalent to that score on the IALS and NALS.

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  • Foundation learning in New Zealand: an overview

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This book comes at a timely point in the development of the foundation skills sector in New Zealand. The purpose of this first chapter is to provide an overall context, by reviewing what is meant by the term foundation skills and its various synonyms before moving on to a brief history of the sector in New Zealand and in particular, the significance of the 1996 International Adult Literacy Survey that proved to be a turning-point in its development. Following a discussion of the broader significance of research and evaluation, the chapter then reviews where we stand at present in terms of policy, the range of provision operating and the learners that it serves. Finally, an outline is provided of the book’s chapters and what they cover.

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  • OECD/CERI Formative assessment project background report : New Zealand

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    While there had been a community-based adult literacy movement active in New Zealand since the late 1970s (Hill, 1990), the sector’s provision and political presence was marginal at best. Its advocates struggled to establish a secure funding source without a research base, within an educational system that had long prided itself on its child literacy achievements and therefore had scepticism about the existence of adult literacy issues. The results from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) in 1996 proved to be a turning-point, as it provided the first substantial evidence of the levels of New Zealand adults’ basic skills. Like a lot of comparable countries such as Canada, the US and Australia, the IALS results (OECD, 1997) showed that approximately one quarter of New Zealand adults were operating at Level 1 and a similar proportion at Level 2. While all groups were represented to some degree in the lower skill categories, there were disproportionately higher numbers of Pacific Islanders,1 Maori2, those who have a first language other than English, those with minimal secondary education, older people and those not in employment. Further analyses (Ministry of Education, 2004; Workbase, 1998) showed concentrations of low skill populations in some rural areas (especially the Far North and the eastern North Island) and the Auckland metropolitan area and in blue-collar occupations, the manufacturing, agricultural, hunting and fishing industries. These results are reasonably akin to other countries with which New Zealand traditionally compares itself such as Australia, Canada and the US, but behind others like Sweden and the Netherlands.

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  • Learning to teach: Success case studies of teacher induction in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Aitken, Helen; Bruce Ferguson, Pip; McGrath, Fiona; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen; Ritchie, Jenny (2008-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Whakawhanaungatanga: Partnerships in bicultural development in early childhood care and education

    Ritchie, Jenny; Rau, Cheryl (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The experience of women with chronic illness aged between 65 to 74 years: A qualitative participatory study

    Roy, Dianne; Giddings, Lynne (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Hikaru Yamashita, Humanitarian Space and International Politics: The Creation of Safe Areas (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2004)

    Moses, Jeremy (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Book review

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