49 results for Unclassified, 2013

  • Health behaviour change: Applying Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model

    Flett, RA (2013-07-04)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • Research ethics: A New Zealand perspective

    Flett, RA (2013-07-03)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • Colonic transit studies to measure gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Ellis, Pete M; Stanley, James; Nowitz, Mark; Dunn, Helen; Huthwaite, Mark; Grant, Eve (2013-10-30)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This is the research protocol for an observational (cross-sectional) study investigating gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients. Recruitment for this study will begin in 2014.

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  • Indigenous rights and development : inequality constraints in Brazilian cities : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of International Development at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Souza Zaiden, Soraya (2013)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This thesis aims at identifying how indigenous rights, as part of a human rights approach to development, have been addressed by urban welfare policies in Brazil. As a starting point, this desk based study is primarily focused on an analysis of the impacts of urbanisation on indigenous livelihoods. Despite not being a new trend, urbanisation of indigenous people has exposed their situation of deprivation and disadvantage, and the increasing pressures of assimilation policies. Social indicators of urban indigenous communities’ wellbeing have pointed to a growing gap between indigenous and non-indigenous population. The access to distinct basic welfare provision is not only determinant in reducing disparities but would also represent the compliance of a state with the indigenous rights framework. This thesis investigates if and how the Brazilian social agenda is in compliance with and indigenous rights framework. The Brazilian government acknowledged Brazil as multi-ethnic, which is reflected in the domestic legal framework, and also in the ratification of international covenants and declarations related to indigenous rights. However, the need of the urban indigenous population for differentiated service provisions has represented a challenging matter in policy making. The existence of an implementation gap between the indigenous rights framework and their effective application is a relevant theme for analysis and evaluation, in order to identify the factors that are hindering state compliance with the standards that have already been legislated. To this regard, the experience of urban indigenous communities in Brazil is explored in two case studies, related to the Pankararu, in Sao Paulo, and the Terena, in Campo Grande. The outcomes of the mainstream welfare policies are also investigated through the lens of urban indigenous communities. Ultimately this thesis unveils the potential of the Brazilian state, as the duty-bearer of indigenous rights, as capable and responsible to unleash the realisation of indigenous expectations to overcome powerlessness, economic underdevelopment and cultural disruptions.

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  • The evolution of benefit sharing agreements in Papua New Guinea : what are the lessons learnt and what are the prospects for the future? : a research presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development in Development Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Anoser, Killian Saulmai (2013)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    With an abundance of natural resources, the extractive and fishery exploitation at a developed stage, Papua New Guinea (PNG) should have been at the top end of the developing world, however, this has not materialised. PNG is going through the dilemmas of development through high rate of resource exploitation and unequal distribution of benefits that is having detrimental effect on the economy and general living standard. Many have questioned why this situation has existed without being addressed. It is also acknowledged here that there has been much literature that has been written on the environment and social impacts of resource project, however, there has been little written on the benefits flowing through to those people affected by resource developments. This report attempts to address those benefit sharing issues. A review of past and current projects and how they distributed benefits has provided a baseline from which the most important elements for future benefit sharing have been identified. These are that BSA are negotiated, legally binding agreements that recognise property rights, are internationally recognised, they allocate and demarcate responsibilities and ensure development coherence. Using these characteristics, a fair and equitable benefit sharing could then be developed for resource projects in Papua New Guinea.

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  • Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen

    Wagner, Daniel (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Student participants in three countries across the planet collaborated to make movies, with their mobile phones, about environmental sustainability. The thirty‐nine participants ‐ film & television students at Unitec PASA; acoustics and sound students at Salford University in Manchester, UK; and graphic design students at Université de Strasbourg in Strasbourg, France ‐ divided into four international teams (each of which consisted of students from all three countries). They used a variety of Web 2 tools – Google Docs, Google+ Hangouts, Twitter, Dropbox, WordPress ‐ to collaboratively determine the specific subject matter and the story of each team’s film, the shots they would need to tell each story, and in which country each shot would be taken. In the end, they delivered four mobile movies that looked at different sustainability sub‐topics. The project was capped with feedback from the lecturers involved and by video reflections from the students.

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  • Robotic chair for remote cardiovascular risk assessment

    Jayawardena, Chandimal (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The objective of this project was to develop an intelligent robotic chair for cardiovascular risk assessment. The first prototype of the chair is currently in the technical testing phase. This robotic chair can engage users (patients) using human-robot interaction strategies and help them improve their cardiovascular risk. It measures several clinical parameters within a short period of time, by providing appropriate instructions to the user. Collectively these measurements can be used to provide a comprehensive assessment of the severity of heart failure symptoms, and this information may then be used to guide management and avoid hospital admission.

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  • The effects of aural input enhancement on L2 acquisition

    Reinders, Hayo; Cho, Meiyoung (2013-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Input enhancement involves attempts to direct the learner’s attention to specific linguistic forms in target language input (Sharwood Smith, 1993). One way to do this is by manipulating the input in order to attract learners’ attention to the target feature, for example, by underlining or bolding it or by artificially increasing its frequency in the input (an input flood). A number of studies have investigated the effects of enriched input (e.g., Jourdenais, Ota, Stauffer, Boyson, & Doughty, 1995; Reinders & Ellis, 2009; Trahey & White, 1993; White, 1998). Although there is some evidence that enriched input can affect L2 acquisition of certain grammatical features, the results are not conclusive. Furthermore, previous studies have been limited to textual input enrichment. In this chapter we investigated the effects of aural input enhancement, a type of input enhancement that to the best of our knowledge has not been reported on before. Participants in the study were given an audiobook to listen to outside of class in which passive structures had been manipulated by 1) artificially increasing the volume slightly of the target items or by 2) slowing down the speed with which the target items were read out. A control group listened to the audiobooks in their original form. The repeated-measures ANOVA analysis showed no significant effect for the manipulated input on acquiring the target form. We discuss some possible reasons for this finding.

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  • How can ERO review the quality of education in centres if they don't know what children are learning?

    Blaiklock, Ken (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The focus of this presentation is not on the processes of self-review but on the lack of valid information that centres have on the effectiveness of their programmes for enhancing children’s learning ...

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  • Monitoring terrestrial bird populations on Tiritiri Matangi Island, Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, 1987-2010

    Graham, Mike; Veitch, Dick; Aguilar, Glenn; Galbraith, Mel (2013-11-18)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Tiritiri Matangi Island is a Scientific Reserve located in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand. In 1986, two years after the start of a ten-year planting programme on the island, members of the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Auckland, began a monitoring programme of the bird populations. A biannual survey scheme commenced in April 1987, counting birds on predetermined transects and at listening posts. This paper focuses on the spring dataset (November) to provide an overview of changes in relative abundance of birds from 1987 to 2010. Over this time, a revegetation programme, the successful translocation of 11 native bird species to the island and eradication of kiore (Pacific rat Rattus exulans) have altered the dynamics of the environment. Overall, an increase in indigenous avian biodiversity and abundance was recorded, although the increase was dominated by two species, the tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) and bellbird (Anthornis melanura). Substantial increases in population abundance were observed in the translocated species recorded in the counts. Exotic species and common forest passerines (fantail Rhipidura fuliginosa, grey warbler Gerygone igata, silvereye Zosterops lateralis) declined. Some of the possible reasons for these changes are discussed.

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  • Hygiene und Reinheit für das Südsee-Paradies : Preußisch-koloniale Interventionen im Samoa

    Schnoor, Christoph (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In den knapp fünfzehn Jahren ihrer kurzen Kolonialherrschaft in Samoa setzte die deutsche Verwaltung unter ihrem Gouverneur, Dr. Wilhelm Solf, eine Reihe von baulichen und infrastrukturellen Erweiterungen des Ortes Apia durch, welche wesentliche Modernisierung bedeuteten. Dieser Aufsatz untersucht sowohl die übergreifende Entwicklung Apias zu einer Kleinstadt als auch einige ausgewählte architektonische Projekte der deutschen Verwaltung. Diese Projekte werden aus der Perspektive von Hygiene und Reinheit – in direkter und in übertragener Form – betrachtet. Dabei werden zwei sich einander widersprechende Tendenzen aufgezeigt: einerseits der Versuch der Verwaltung und insbesondere des Gouverneurs Solf, Samoanisches von Fremdem zu scheiden, um die Samoa-Inseln als den ›Garten Eden‹ zu erhalten, als die sie von Deutschland aus vielfach wahrgenommen wurden. Dabei wurde Apia kurioserweise zu einem rein europäischen Ort des Fremden in Samoa. Andererseits ist die Tendenz einer Vermischung zu beobachten, die sich in Koedukation und gemeinsamer Krankenhausbetreuung zeigt sowie im Interesse, von den samoanischen Traditionen und Gegebenheiten zu lernen und diese teils in die eigene Architektur einzubeziehen. Diese Spannung zwischen Distanz und Symbiose ist nicht aufzulösen, sondern besteht in Samoa nebeneinander

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  • The governance of high performance sport

    Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Bottenburg, Maarten Van (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Upon completion of this chapter the reader should be able to:  Discuss meanings and definitions associated with the governance of sport in the high performance setting  Distinguish between organizational governance and systemic governance in relation to the evolving nature of high performance governance practice  Discuss issues and trends associated with the governance of high performance sport on the international stage

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  • Does Our Amazing Place build community resilience?

    Roberts, Linda; Gear, Carol; Howie, Nandulal; Bridgman, Geoff (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Objective The objective of this research was an evaluation of Our Amazing Place Treasure Hunt Events held in Unsworth Heights in the North Shore of Auckland and Massey in the West of Auckland respectively. The research focused on the question “Does Our Amazing Place build community resilience?”. Methods During the event participants were asked to fill out an evaluation form of their experience of the event and to provide some demographic data Results The statistics showed participants rated fun/fitness activities as the most enjoyable activity of the event. Secondly, they experienced a greater connection to their community in terms of becoming more aware of what their community had to offer and a high percentage of participants said they would continue connecting to their community after the event. Results also showed that a high percentage of participants engaging in the event lived locally and a over eighty percent of participants rated the event between 8 and 10 out of 10. Conclusion We identified some important patterns and themes that contribute to the building of community resilience if implemented within a community development framework. We also found that that the Our Amazing Place Treasure Hunt event is grounded in sound community development principles as it attempts to build connectedness and social capital within communities thus building community resilience in the process.

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  • Research-informed teaching of adults : a worthy alternative to old habits and hearsay?

    Benseman, John (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    How and why teachers teach the way they do is central to understanding the impact of education on learners. While many professions have integrated research findings into their practitioners’ practice, education’s record is less consistent in this respect. This paper outlines the case for teachers to become research-informed in their teaching (RIT). It firstly considers what is involved in being research-informed, what types of research are most relevant, why it warrants consideration as well as issues associated with it. It then reviews RIT in the New Zealand context and particularly in relation to teaching adults. Finally, the paper looks at how an RIT approach might be implemented.

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  • Focus on Fiji: GIS Mapping to Support Conservation Planning

    Winder, Linton; Aguilar, Glenn (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In collaboration with the Institute of Applied Science of the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji, the project conducted research on the development of a Geographic Information System for biodiversity conservation, development planning and environmental management. The objectives of the research include the characterization of the spatial distribution of key organisms that are of conservation interest, the determination of the effects of environmental perturbations such as climate change and contributing models that support mitigation strategies and conservation prioritization.

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  • Yes, we do need evidence to show whether Te Whāriki is effective : a reply to Anne Smith’s discussion paper, “Does Te Whāriki need evidence to show it is effective?”

    Blaiklock, Ken (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Te Whāriki, the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, was released in 1996. Since that time, it has been widely praised by academics and teachers in this country and beyond. Although there is much to admire in the aspirations of the document, a number of important concerns have been raised about its efficacy. These concerns were noted as part of a presentation I gave to the Ministry of Education on October 23, 2013, “Early Childhood Education and Care in New Zealand: A Closer Look at the Evidence”. (A copy of the powerpoint slides from the presentation is attached as an appendix.)

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  • The unstable city : heritage and agency

    Budgett, Jeanette; Kaza, Krystina; McDonald, Allan (2013-06-19)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Unstable City engages with questions of Auckland’s architectural heritage and draws attention to the potential widespread loss of buildings. The immediate prompt for the publication was the series of devastating earthquakes in Christchurch New Zealand during 2010 and 2011. Auckland’s seismic vulnerability and burgeoning growth projections specifically threaten older buildings. This project champions their value and signals their precarious status. Please note that this is interactive publication and is best viewed in Acrobat Reader. Readers will need to click on the right hand corner (it will turn like a book page). You may need to download this publication first.

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  • Social cohesion and free home internet in New Zealand

    Williams, Jocelyn (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter discusses community outcomes of free home Internet access. It draws on case study re-search on Computers in Homes (CIH), a scheme established in New Zealand in 2000 for the purpose of bridging the digital divide, particularly for low-income families who have school-aged children. The government-funded CIH scheme aims to strengthen relationships between families and schools, improve educational outcomes for children, and provide greater opportunities for their parents. CIH achieves this by working with many primary (elementary) schools, each of which selects 25 families who will benefit from the program. Each family receives a refurbished computer, software, and six months free Internet,as well as twenty hours of free IT training and technical support so that all adults are equipped to make effective use of the Internet. The scheme has evolved to deliver much more than technology. It has becomes a contributor to social capital in the communities where it has been established. This chapter uses a case study research approach to demonstrate and theorize this process of community building using a construct of social cohesion, which appears to be strengthened by the CIH intervention. Where stronger social networks, volunteerism, and civic engagement were documented in the research, leader figures also mobilized to act on shared goals. These findings highlight the value of existing social resources within communities for achieving community goals while also maximizing community Internet longevity.

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  • Cultural Identity and the City - Auckland, NZ and Wismar

    Schnoor, Christoph (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    What forms the cultural identity of a city? As architectural historian and theorist, I will apply this question to the “Baukultur”, this German term, on the one hand heavily loaded and on the other hand virtually impossible to translate. “Baukultur” stands for a culture of architecture and the built environment in its entirety. Thus I will ask: how can the identity of a city be defined via its built culture? This notion of Baukultur is less narrow in its definition than one would most likely expect to see in Wismar, a town so heavily focussed on its status as UNESCO World Heritage. Is not the city as a whole in its built development a testimony to past and present architectural culture? If this is so, a discussion of built culture needs to be geared to what has marked and continues to mark the development of a city, rather than asking for the ‘beautiful’ constituents of the city. As Aldo Rossi did in his 1966 Architecture of the City, we will follow the notion of typology as defining element and of the ‘tessuto’, the fabric as a quasi-sculptural basic element of the city. Please allow me to answer the question regarding built culture via a brief investigation of Auckland, hoping that this may stimulate reflections on this very question in Wismar.

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  • Adult education : New Zealand, to 2012

    Benseman, John (2013-11-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Adult education, New Zealand, to 2012. In its broadest sense, adult education refers to the education of anyone beyond school-age. Historically, the sector has constantly evolved as elements of its provision have matured into autonomous sectors in their own right, leaving adult education to constantly re-invent itself on the boundaries of the educational mainstream in its mission of meeting adult learner needs. Maori education, Colonial adult education, Workers’ Educational Association (WEA), After World War I, Depression and World War II, Council of Adult Education, Including new populations in adult education - Maori, Women, From the mid-twentieth century, Reorganisation from the 1970s, Challenges of neoliberal policy and Global Financial Crisis, Significance of adult education in New Zealand.

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