54 results for Unclassified, 2015

  • Achieving quality teaching in developing countries : identifying factors that influence the delivery of quality teaching in primary schools in rural Cambodia : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Institute of Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Arnold, Denise Joy (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    At a global level the Education for All focus has shifted from years of schooling to the quality of education being attained. The delivery of quality education is dependent upon quality teaching. While there is no clear definition of quality teaching there are recognised characteristics which lend themselves to quality teaching and therefore are used as proxies to identify what constitutes a quality teacher. Of importance to this study is the fact these same recognised characteristics of what constitutes quality teaching and a quality teacher are reflected in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport in Cambodia (MoEYS) goals and teachers in Cambodia clearly identify with these characteristics. Drawing on a case study of Cambodia this research examines the influences that work upon a teacher to either positively influence the delivery of quality teaching or to negatively influence the same. While influences which positively and negatively impact quality teaching are wide ranging, some are definitely more influential than others. Hence there is a clear recognition of the importance of the provision of basic resources for education. The delivery of quality teaching requires basic physical infrastructure and resources such as teacher training, adequate teacher salaries and teaching materials. Without these basic resources a teacher is destined to fail in the delivery of quality teaching. This is particularly relevant in a developing country where the teachers are more likely to be working at a pre-professional level in terms of teaching skills, dependent upon teaching materials and reliant on basic classroom management skills. This is the case in Cambodia. Before any other influences become significant these fundamental needs must be met. There is also an important link between the health of both teachers and children and the delivery of quality teaching. Basic health needs must be met if the delivery of quality teaching is not to be undermined.

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  • Wind in the sails or captain of the Va'a? : the influence of the global education agenda in the Samoan education system : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Tu'i, Nina Lucia (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The aim of this research was to explore the influence of an international education agenda, particularly through the Education for All goals and Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 2, on the education system of Samoa. The findings of the research indicate that the priorities of the Samoan education policy are closely related to this second Millennium Development Goal, in particular with regards to access to education. Samoan education policies also relate to the emerging Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) when addressing educational quality. The emphasis on international goals is problematic as these goals do not take into consideration the context or culture-specific needs of the country, but rather reflect a combination of various underlying theories such as rights-based approaches and economic theories. The involvement of donors in the education system of Samoa was found to be strongly influenced by MDG 2. It also became evident that donors give priority to their own interests and their funding can easily change as priorities in development shift. This research has also found that there is an indigenous education agenda being constructed by rich academic discussions about the goals and purpose of education in the Pacific. These discussions are reinforced by selected regional initiatives, such as the Re-thinking Education Initiative and the Pacific Regional Initiative for the Delivery of basic Education (PRIDE). Pacific education experts point out the importance of education being culturally relevant, as the current system is perceived as an alien force, and describe how, by its nature, the education system imposes incompatible values on the children of the Pacific. The Samoan education system was found to set its own course, while also incorporating international goals, donor priorities, the national level priorities and ideas presented by Pacific authors on education.

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  • Learning English for a life of choice in New Zealand : a case study of Afghan women refugees' bilingual class experiences in Palmerston North : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Hermawan, Erika Soraya (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This thesis looks at the experiences of a group of women refugees learning English as part of their resettlement in New Zealand. The women’s husbands were working as interpreters for the New Zealand Police in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. To ensure their safety after the New Zealand Police were withdrawn, these Afghan families were invited to resettle in Palmerston North, New Zealand. To attain in-depth results, this research report focuses on the women’s efforts to integrate within the social life of New Zealand and their experiences in acquiring English as a tool to their successful resettlement program. A small study was conducted in the context of an English Language Partners’ (ELP) Bilingual English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL)-Literacy class for refugees. Participants for this research were five Afghan women, two ELP’s ESOL teachers, and one of the women’s husbands. The methods used were semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, classroom observation, and curriculum analysis. This report is framed within adult pre-literacy education and investigates whether women refugees become empowered through taking literacy classes. Findings show that there are links between language acquisition within the refugees’ resettlement process and personal empowerment. Afghan women’s acquisition of English language skills has brought more personal control over their mobility and has changed relationships with their husbands to some extent since moving to New Zealand. Furthermore, the woman’s learning experiences have brought them to a level where they can move on from ELP to a higher English level class.

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  • Capacity building and disaster response : a case study of NGOs' response to Cyclone Evan in Samoa : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Masters of International Development at Massey University, New Zealand

    Pycroft, Virginia (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    With natural disasters increasing both in number and economic impact, the challenge for governments is to effectively respond to the needs of affected communities. In difficult conditions, and often with resource constraints, Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) have contributed to meeting the needs of affected communities during disaster responses. NGOs usually have flexible structures, which enable them to respond to a rapidly changing environment. They also often have strong links to the communities in which they work, which creates good synergies when responding to disasters. The involvement of NGOs in a disaster response has been discussed widely in the international community. The challenge is to ensure that NGOs have the capacity to respond effectively when the need arises. This report has a particular focus on Samoa and uses a capacity building lens to investigate a disaster response. It looks closely at the ability of NGOs to assist the Samoan government in a disaster response. The report used a document analysis and semi-structured interviews, with representatives from NGOs involved in the response to Cyclone Evan in 2012, to investigate capacity building in NGOs with a view to enabling them to respond effectively in disaster. The key finding of the report is that the ability of NGOs to form relationships with other stakeholders and to maintain those relationships between disaster responses is important to building partnerships that contribute to the effectiveness of a response.

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  • Energy Behaviour of SMEs in New Zealand

    Walton, Sara (2015-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    ©  2015  The  Author  

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  • National Household Survey of Energy and Transportation: Energy Cultures Two

    Wooliscroft, Ben (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Executive Summary Key findings: • A clear picture of the state of the energy efficiency of our housing stock, our household energy behaviours and our driving (and transport) behaviours has been collected. • Four clear clusters of energy consumers are identified: – The Energy Comfortable (23.7%) have less remedial (e.g. dehumidifier) energy use. They live in warm dry houses. – The Energy Poor (21.1%) not only have the lowest incomes, they also have the lowest number of energy efficiency household modifications and practise the least number of energy saving driving behaviours. – The Energy Average (24.6%) are exactly that, exceptional in very few attributes. There are significant opportunities for them to save energy. – The Energy Efficient (24.3%) earn a similar amount to the Energy Average and the Energy Comfortable but have power bills similar to the Energy Poor. • New Zealand’s housing stock is frequently not adequately insulated or efficiently heated • Many New Zealanders do not practise energy saving behaviours around the house, including behaviour as simple as turning off lights in un-occupied rooms. This research gives insight into the frequency with which behaviours are practised. • There is considerable opportunity to save money through efficient driving (most estimates are 15%) however many efficient driving behaviours are not practised by our sample. • The earthquake in Christchurch is clearly found in the results with regard to heating, transportation and traffic issues. • Poor energy behaviour in the house is strongly related to poor driving (from an energy point of view) and a low energy efficient house. • The results would suggest that a systems approach to improving energy consumption will reap the best rewards.

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  • Palmerston North Legal Entities Project: A feasibility study completed by Katheryn Margaret Pascoe as part of a 3rd year Bachelor of Social Work placement at the Palmerston North City Council.

    Pascoe, Katheryn Margaret (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The Legal Entities Project was completed as part of a 12 week Bachelor of Social Work 3rd year placement through the collaboration of Massey University and the Palmerston North City Council Community Services team. The project was focused on exploring what the legal needs of local Incorporated Societies and Charitable Trusts providing social services in Palmerston North are, to then recommend a service to meet the needs of the sector. [First paragraph of Executive Summary]

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  • Young people facing housing deprivation in Palmerston North: a crisis?

    Douglas, Olivia; Viles, Amy (2015-11)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    If you are a young person tonight, or any other night, living in Palmerston North, you will need to hope that you have somewhere to sleep, as currently the city provides no safe and secure emergency housing for young people. If, for a range of reasons, a young person is not able to, or chooses not to stay with their immediate or extended family, the social services in the city are forced to ask that young person to consider sleeping on friends’ couches or to seek other equally inadequate housing options in the absence of a service that could meet their housing needs.[From Executive Summary]

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  • Walking with broken crutches : exploring the effects of host-state fragility upon refugees : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Foreman, Mark (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This research report explores the relationship between state fragility and the hosting of refugees in the context of the protracted Afghan refugee crisis, where fragile state Pakistan hosts Afghan refugees. The reality for the majority of the world’s refugees is that their hosts are neighbouring countries which are in varying conditions of state fragility. Some states are bearing the brunt of the global refugee burden despite their general struggle to provide basic services and livelihood opportunities for their own citizens. For these ‘fragile hosts’, providing for an influx of refugees would be untenable without significant international assistance. Following a comprehensive literature review looking at the complex interplay between conflict, state fragility, underdevelopment and forced migration, the report case study is prefaced by background chapters surveying the factors which triggered Afghan forced migration, and Pakistan’s fragile status as host respectively. This report then offers an analysis of two region-specific UNHCR documents which explores the relationship between Afghan refugees and Pakistan as ‘fragile host’. Various host-state incapacities were found to entrench endemic poverty and insecurity in the Afghan refugee population in Balochistan due to a lack of livelihood opportunities, and availability and access to quality services. These issues have also created barriers to local refugee integration, and the fluctuating interest of international donors has historically served to exacerbate these challenges. This report argues that a much-improved understanding of the multi-layered and complex regional, national and local relationships between protracted conflict, state fragility and refugee-host dynamics is needed in order to approach a sustainable solution.

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  • A comparison of New Zealand police officers' perceptions of development practice within New Zealand development programmes : a research paper presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Brennan, Kevin J (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    From the 1990s onwards, the New Zealand Police followed a global trend of progressively becoming involved in overseas peacekeeping and development deployments that over time changed from operational interventions to deployments that were more developmental in nature. While development concepts within these New Zealand Police development interventions have been committed to in principal, there has been little or no research undertaken as to how New Zealand police perceive and undertake their roles within these interventions. Using a post-development framework this research explores how these development interventions and the subsequent expectations for the role of the New Zealand police officer during development interventions overseas were created. A survey and interviews were conducted with a small number of New Zealand police officers who have deployed within these interventions to identify their perceptions of development practice so as to compare with the expectations of the development programmes. My research predominantly finds that New Zealand police officers place a high value on their prior New Zealand policing experiences. In implementing development programmes there was an overwhelming recognition by the research participants for the need to form positive relationships by listening and acknowledging another’s culture. This recognition of the benefits of positive working relationships has led this research to conclude that a recognition of the importance of the personal agency of New Zealand police officers could contribute to recognise and support the personal agency of their development partner to achieve realistic and desirable development outcomes for the intended beneficiary, provided programme design is constructed to incorporate this approach.

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  • Destratification – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    During summer, the surface waters of lakes warm and become less dense than the colder bottom waters. This process is known as stratification and prevents surface and bottom water mixing. Stratification can occur intermittently in shallower lakes or for up to 9 months in deeper lakes (Figure 1). Under natural conditions stratification normally breaks down during the winter months when surface temperatures equilibrate with the bottom of the lake.

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  • Pest fish detection using environmental DNA – fact sheet

    Banks, Jonathan C.; Hogg, Ian D. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Molecular tools using DNA sequencing can improve pest fish management by ensuring accurate identification of fish, especially larval fish, without the need for specialist taxonomic knowledge. DNA is made of four chemicals; guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), or cytosine (C), joined together as a string (Figure 1). The order of the chemicals is unique to each species and can be used as a DNA "barcode" to identify organisms. It is relatively simple to obtain DNA sequences for a reference gene such as the widely accepted "barcode gene" cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1, and compare the sequence to a voucher specimen sequence in genetic databases such as GenBank and the Barcode of Life database BOLD.

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  • Exclusion and removal of pest fish from Lake Ohinewai – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Ling, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Many of the shallow lakes in the lower Waikato River floodplain have significantly degraded water quality as a result of nutrient and sediment enrichment from non-point sources. Pest fish species such as koi carp, goldfish, and catfish have exacerbated lake decline by resuspending lake sediments and uprooting submerged macrophytes. This this resulted in a collapse of submerged macrophytes and progression from clear-water oligotrophic state to a eutrophic (algal-dominated) state.

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  • Legal status of Rudd, Catfish, Goldfish – fact sheet

    Collier, Kevin J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 species (equivalent to 38% of all freshwater fish species) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Pest Fish Control - Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Collier, Kevin J.; Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Due to their negative impacts on water quality and native biodiversity in New Zealand, regional councils have included a number of introduced freshwater fish species such as koi carp, rudd, brown bullhead catfish, goldfish, tench, gambusia (mosquitofish) and European perch (Figure 1) in their pest management plans. The Department of Conservation and regional councils undertake control and eradication programmes around New Zealand every year in order to contain their spread and reduce their impacts. Nearly all regions of mainland New Zealand have at least one of these species but they are most prevalent in the Auckland and Waikato regions. LERNZ has been researching the population ecology and capture methods of pest fish populations in order to develop efficient methods for their control.

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  • New Zealand pest fish species: Koi carp and Gambusia – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 (39% of all freshwater fish) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Flocculation and sediment capping – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Sediment capping and flocculation are in-lake techniques designed to reduce internal nutrient loads from the bottom sediments of lakes. These loads are roughly equivalent in magnitude to external loads. Case studies of the Rotorua lakes (Figure 1) show that with careful design and management, sediment capping and flocculation can reduce nutrient concentrations and the likelihood of algal blooms. Relevant actions can include: (i) reducing bioavailable phosphorus in stream inflows through continuous addition of the active material to the stream, (ii) removing bioavailable phosphorus, and flocculation and sedimentation of nutrients, and (iii) altering sediment composition so that nutrients are more efficiently retained within the bottom sediments

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  • LERNZdb Freshwater Database – fact sheet

    Parshotam, A. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    The LERNZdb Freshwater Database is a repository for freshwater quality data and biodiversity measurement data for lakes, rivers and wetlands in New Zealand. It was developed as part of the Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand (LERNZ: LERNZ.co.nz) programme in co-operation between the Information & Technology Services Division (ITS) and LERNZ researchers at the University of Waikato. LERNZdb has the ability to store a wide variety of freshwater data in a consistent format, it also scores the quality of the data based on the provided quality controlled information. This allows the user to filter data based on the standard of data collection and encourages the provision of high quality data for use in modelling applications.

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  • Invasive fish and nutrients – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Invasive fish such as koi (or common) carp (Cyprinus carpio) are large fish as adults (typically 1-3 kg) and can exist at high biomass (commonly 1000-2000 kg/ha). Because of their large size, high biomass, and suctorial feeding behaviour that disturbs the lake bed, koi carp have the potential to contribute a significant amount of plant nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) to lake waters. To estimate the potential of koi carp to inhibit lake restoration, we estimated the rates of excretion relative to other processes contributing nutrients to lakes.

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  • Remote sensing of water quality – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Mathew Grant (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Evaluating water quality is a key tool in lake management. Typically water quality samples are restricted to a limited number of point samples collected in situ in the field, which can be time consuming and costly. Also, the few in situ points sampled fail to capture the spatial variability, e.g., for the large Lake Waikare (3,400 ha; Figure. 1).

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