541 results for Unclassified

  • Diabetes Type 2: Management of care for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Kenealy, Timothy (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of the book Classroom talk: Understanding dialogue, pedagogy and practice, by C. Edwards-Groves, M. Antsey, & G. Bull.

    Jeurissen, Maree (2014-12-01)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    This publication combines theory, practice, and research concerned with the talk that occurs in primary school classrooms. It is a welcome addition to material supporting literacy in culturally diverse settings, as the authors valorise classroom discourse as central to all learning. For teachers working within the constraints of an increasingly narrow assessment driven curriculum prioritising the readily measurable components of literacy, ie reading and writing, it is both refreshing and important, that talk is afforded such attention.

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  • Review of Disobeying the Security Council: Countermeasures against Wrongful Sanctions by Antonios Tzanakopoulos

    Hood, Anna (2011)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Book review: Trauma and Affective Spill - Performing Feeling in Cultures of Memory by Bryoni Trezise, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2014

    Willis, Emma (2015-09-01)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Review of Bryoni Trezise's "Performing Feeling in Cultures of Memory" for Cultural Studies Review, Vol 21, No. 2, September 2015

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  • Book ‘Public Transit Planning and Operation: Modeling, Practice and Behavior’ review

    Liu, Tao (2015-12)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Interview: Kaupapa Maori: Shifting the social

    Durie, M; Hoskins, Te Kawehau; Jones, A (2012)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Interview: Kaupapa Maori: The dangers of domestication

    Smith, GH; Hoskins, Te Kawehau; Jones, A (2012)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Using citizen science for coastal data collection

    Orchard, Shane (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Coastal News, 62, 3-4.

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  • La verdadera vida de VN (Interview with Matias Serra Bradford)

    Boyd, Brian (2007-07-08)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cities is Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino presented

    Monteith, Alexandra (2008)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cities is Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino presented by Alex Monteith as a list of Invisible Cities’ adjectival collective common compound concrete countable mass plural proper possessive singular uncountable nouns and page numbers in chronological order as printed in the 1997 Vintage publication translated from the Italian by William Weaver

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  • Machine learning technology and its application to computer games for health education

    Chen, Aaron; Baghaei, Nilufar; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein; Pang, Paul; Tsoulis, Athina; Court, Gudrun (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Driven by an initiative of the Adult & Paediatric Diabetes Psychology Service of New Zealand, research has been performed to develop new mechanisms, in the form of computer games, to educate children and teenagers about living with diabetes. Aimed at achieving maximum education effectiveness, the ultimate goal of our research is to develop innovative machine learning algorithms that can be used in games to improve their ability to learn about the changing needs of children and to incorporate this intelligence into the game interface. We also plan to collect and report on the information collected from testing our computer games within a small group of children who have been diagnosed with type I diabetics. Our research plan has been structured into three major stages, starting from modifying some open-source games towards constructing brand new 3D games that are powered by intelligent machine learning technologies for highly effective education. Specifically, at stage one, a joint collaboration has been established between healthcare professionals at the Starship hospital and Unitec staffs from both the Department of Computing and the Department of Performing and Screen Arts. The main objective of this collaboration is to develop a working game prototype that can deliver essential health knowledge to children and meet reasonable usability requirements. In line with our research plan, fast development of a game prototype becomes the first technical challenge faced by the research team. To tackle this challenge, a decision is made to embed education features, including a variety of visual effects that provide knowledge-rich feedbacks to game players, into an existing 2D game. After evaluating and comparing a number of open-source games, a Java-based Mario Bros game has finally been identified as an ideal base for the game prototype. The Mario Bros game has long been considered as an engaging game for children and can be easily migrated to different computing platforms including mobile systems. For the purpose of enriching the Mario Bros game with essential diabetes knowledge, we have proposed three important strategies, namely structure enhancement, feedback enhancement, and challenge enhancement, to guide our design of education games. The three strategies are derived naturally from Malone’s conditions that help to induce the flow state, which is marked by children’s intensive involvement in a series of game-playing activities. Extensive use of the three strategies is clearly evidenced in the design of our first game prototype, which is aimed at educating children with the right skill to manage their diabetes through regular exercise, consuming healthy food, and daily insulin intake. Implementation of the modified Mario Bros game has been completed successfully. Our game is able to show the blood sugar level of the main character which is called Mario in the game. The dynamic change of Mario’s blood sugar level is directly related to Mario’s physical activities, such as walking and jumping. When the blood sugar level falls outside a safe zone, the blood sugar indicator will change its colour to warn children. Meanwhile a window will pop up and children will be asked to either eat some food or inject a certain amount of insulin in order to solve the problem. Our game also features a stage-based design. At early stage of the game, a small set of recommended food or insulin injection will be provided when Mario has abnormal blood sugar level. At later stages of the game, the challenge increases and children need to choose among a large variety of food and need to decide the right amount of insulin injection. Our diabetes education game was successfully presented at Unitec's Kaleidoscope event in July 2011, at URC research forum in October 2011, and at the OZHI conference in December 2011. It has also attracted wide public interests and has been reported in the Advance magazine and the Aucklander. Inspired by the success of the first game prototype, great efforts have been made to design and develop a 3D game packed with more interactive, entertaining and educational features. The 3D game was completely designed and developed by the research team. The implementation of the game will be finalized soon. In the future, we plan to evaluate our game prototypes with a small group of children at the Starship hospital. Hopefully, the evaluation results will shed some new lights on the effectiveness of computer games as mainstream tools for child education. The lessons learned from the game prototypes will also pave the way towards developing powerful machine learning technologies and smart learning environments that promote adaptive and prolonged learning experience.

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  • Lamb carcass classification system based on computer vision. Part 2, Texture features and neural networks

    Chandraratne, M; Samarasinghe, S; Kulasiri, G; Frampton, C; Bickerstaffe, R

    Unclassified
    Lincoln University

    In this study, the ability of neural network models for lamb carcass classification was compared with a multivariate statistical technique with respect to the classification accuracy. The lamb carcass classification system is based on image and texture analyses. Digital images of lamb chops were used to calculate twelve image geometric variables. In addition, a set of ninety textural features was used to extract the textural information from the acquired images. Texture analysis is based on the grey level co-occurrence matrix method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of feature spaces. Two feature sets were generated. These feature sets comprised of 14 principal component (PC) scores calculated from the original variables and 14 variables selected from the original set of variables. Both feature spaces were used for neural network and discriminant analysis. Several network configurations were tested and the classification accuracy of 93% was achieved from three-layer multilayer perceptron (MLP) network. Its performance was 14% better than that from the Discriminant function analysis (DFA). The study shows the predictive potential of combining neural networks with texture analysis for lamb grading.

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  • Applying citizen science to freshwater ecosystem restoration – fact sheet

    Peters, Michael A.; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Citizen science describes the diverse ways in which the public participates in scientific investigations. Participation covers a spectrum from sending observations to a project coordinator to designing, implementing protocols, analysing and sharing findings. The popularity of citizen science both for educational and scientific purposes has grown in recent decades. Community volunteers now participate in diverse programmes that investigate the effects of climate change on biota, evolutionary processes, invasive species ecology, and changes in water and air quality (Figure 1).

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  • Lake restoration lags – fact sheet

    Mueller, H; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Regulatory responses to declines in lake health have often been characterised by long lag times. Under these circumstances regulation has often failed to prevent declining lake health or to implement successful restoration programmes. For Lake Rotorua, response lags can be seen in the time passing between the recognition of water quality decline (e.g. weed problems and algal blooms), and the effect of regulatory actions to improve water quality (e.g. land use management changes). Research undertaken by Mueller et al. (2015) has shown that lag times of approximately 5 years may occur between significant environmental declines and regulatory responses.

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  • Paleolimnology to determine lake reference conditions – fact sheet

    Kpodonu, A; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Paleolimnology is the study of the early history of lakes based on sediment composition. Lake sediments build up in undisturbed areas of lake bottoms (e.g. in deep central basins) over long periods of time. These sediments will reflect the prevailing conditions in the catchment, climate and in-lake processes at the time of deposition. Specific 'markers' can be used to determine when a particular layer of sediment was deposited. For example, in volcanic areas lakes sediments may contain volcanic ash layers from historical eruptions that can be used to date the sediment (Figure 1). Where it is possible to take long sediment cores in relatively undisturbed areas the historical record of the lake may stretch back far enough to give insights into historical climatic conditions and pre-human settlement state of the lake. This pre-human condition is sometimes referred to as a "reference state". Defining the reference state is important as it provides an indication of the extent to which the current state differs from it. This difference provides a useful reference point for setting targets to improve the state of a lake (e.g., as part of the limiting-setting process envisaged under the National Objectives Framework for Freshwater Management 2011).

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  • Catchment modelling with SWAT – fact sheet

    Me, W; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Catchment models determine the source and extent of water quality problems in a catchment. Catchment models may be used to identify 'hotspots' in a region and once calibrated these models may be used to test various land management, land use, and climate-change scenarios. SWAT (Soil & Water assessment tool) is a relatively complex model. The development of SWAT is a continuation of USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) modelling experience spanning more than 30 years. SWAT has been used with some degree of success by the LERNZ group at The University of Waikato and it has been applied to several New Zealand catchments. The model is capable of producing daily discharge and nutrient and sediment loads to streams at a sub-catchment level. ArcSWAT is an ArcGIS-ArcView extension and graphical user input interface for SWAT.

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  • LERNZ: Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand – Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Based at the University of Waikato (Figure 1), the aim of the LERNZ research programme is to provide end-users such as community groups, regional councils and governmental agencies with practical tools and expertise for restoring indigenous biodiversity and water quality in lakes. The research programme is centred around two main themes: • New models and technologies to effectively manage harmful algal blooms • New pest fish management and control technologies LERNZ is based at the University of Waikato, Hamilton New Zealand, and has established a number of collaborations with domestic and international research organisations since its inception in 2005.

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  • Nutrient and sediment loads from farm drains – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Runoff from intensive agriculture has been identified as a major contributor to the decline of New Zealand's freshwater ecosystems. Excessive nutrient and sediment losses to lakes and rivers lead to reduced water clarity and quality, which in turn leads to reductions in biodiversity and amenity and aesthetic values.

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  • The contribution of lakes to greenhouse gas emissions – fact sheet

    Santoso, A; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (C0₂) , methane (CH₄) and nitrous oxide (N₂0) trap heat in the atmosphere. Lakes can play an important role in regulating these gases at global scales. Total carbon uptake by lakes is of the same magnitude as that of oceans or forests, despite lakes occupying s area. In lakes, GHGs are mostly produced in the bottom sediment as products of organic matter decomposition. Geothermal activities - of importance to some Rotorua lakes - may also contribute substantial amounts of C0₂ and CH₄.

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  • Lake models – fact sheet

    Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Models of lakes are used to provide insights into water quality at some future point in time, so that management actions may be targeted and cost-effective. In the past, small-scale physical models were used to simulate lake environments (Figure 1), but nowadays computer models are used to test potential management options. Computer models use a series of mathematical equations to describe the complex interactions amongst physical, chemical and biological processes that affect the water quality of a lake. The equations are stitched together consecutively in a computer program, allowing millions of calculations to take place in a single simulation.

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