541 results for Unclassified

  • Research ethics: A New Zealand perspective

    Flett, RA (2013-07-03)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • Integrating community-oriented policing and traditional justice systems as police reform and development in post-conflict countries : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    McLeod, Catriona (2014)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Police reform in post-conflict countries has seen the increasing implementation of the community-oriented policing model as a means to introduce democratic policing as a component of the peace building process. However, in many post-conflict countries the situation of legal pluralism exists, where multiple justice systems operate in the same space. Many communities often rely on customary or traditional forms of justice as the formal state justice system does not extend to their location or have any real influence or authority. This research project used document analysis to investigate the contribution community-oriented policing can make to those communities that rely on traditional justice systems. This report introduced two community-oriented policing mechanisms, tara bandu ceremonies in Timor-Leste and the Community Officer Project in Solomon Islands, as case studies. These two mechanisms were analysed and compared with a specific focus on their respective levels of community participation and how they responded to raising awareness of the principles of human rights. The case study analysis found that the tara bandu ceremonies had high levels of community participation and support due to them being an endogenous social structure and the extensive involvement the communities had in developing their respective tara bandu ceremonies. This was in contrast to the Community Officer Project which is an introduced structure and one in which the community appeared to have no real input into the design and implementation process. These findings led to the conclusion that in integrating community-oriented policing and traditional justice systems, consideration should be given to utilising pre-existing traditional structures that have the support of the community.

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  • Does negative advertising work?

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    In an overview of the use of negative advertising through the years, Kaid (1999) notes a real increase in the number of negative advertisements used in presidential campaigns. From 1952 to 1996, such ads made up about 38% of the whole campaign, but during the 1992 and 1996 campaigns, they made up more than half of the total advertising content. Moreover, Kaid (1999) notes that Bill Clinton’s campaigns in 1992 and 1996 reached all time highs in the use of negative ads with 69% and 68% respectively. But does negative advertising work?

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  • Te Ahikāroa: home fires burning

    Robertson, NA

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Tonga's metaphoric hangings

    Brown Pulu, T

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Is Tonga ready for Paris?

    Brown, T

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Big bananas in Kiribati

    Brown Pulu, T; Pamatatau, R

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • What's in a Programme?

    Cusack, B; Petrova, K (2011-08-12)

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    Teaching and research in information technology (IT) is always a reflection of the ever changing landscape of change and continuous innovation. IT programmes also show how content evolves over time, and the emphasis shifts. The current 'digital forensics' buzz-word is not different from the former programming, applications, security, eBusiness and other ubiquitous buzz-words of the past; in fact digital forensics has swept up many of the curriculum remnants of the last decade into a market driven package of law, professionalism and IT technicality.

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  • Teaching and critically reflective practice in Freire

    Benade, L

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    Few of the many books written by Freire drew particular, and extended, attention to the teacher in the way Pedagogy of Freedom (1998) was able to do. While this entry draws on many other important works by Freire, it specifically probes elements of this book to place before readers some of the salient qualities and attributes Freire believed teachers, educators and thinkers of education ought to aspire to.

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  • Waikato 2011 centile charts for assessment of time to run 550m [Microsoft Excel workbook]

    Rush, Elaine; Obolonkin, Victor

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    Centile charts show the position of a measurement compared to a reference population. They are useful for comparing measurements that change with growth and time for an individual or a group. The time to run 550 m was measured as the time taken to run five times around an oval track (26.5m by 42.5m). We have developed gender-specific time to run 550m centile charts from measurements of 5059 children aged 6 to 12 years. The calculations that underpin the graphical representation of these charts have been embedded in the attached excel spreadsheet. For a child, or group of children of the same gender the age and run time in years, minutes and seconds may be entered in the unprotected cells and the point will be plotted on the gender-specific chart and the z score determined. For example for a group of 6 year old girls the median age will be 6.5 years and the median run time of the group may be entered. In this way changes in run time over time may be assessed or different children and groups compared with and without intervention and accounting for gender and age.

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  • Zoo, Aussie, and the EU

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    A twenty-first century riddle of real politik throve: what did the Tongan Prime Minister’s zoo, Australia, and the European Union have in common? Two factors illustrating how preserving the unequal distribution of wealth between northern hemisphere states, and the global south, determined international relations: climate change and asylum seekers. (Idrissov, 2015; Al Jazeera, 2015; Perraudin, 2015). In context, the ill-fated decision making of political leaders had allowed climate change and asylum seekers to overshadow world affairs as leading markers of the present age. (Quartz, 2015; Hedges, 2010).

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  • Zoo in a sea of poop

    Brown Pulu, T

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    The German physicist Albert Einstein defined insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. He could have been describing ‘Akilisi Pohiva and certain ministers of his hand-picked cabinet who developed a condition of repeatedly exhibiting foolhardiness in politics. (Fonua, 2015a). The zoo was behaving badly. Journalist Pesi Fonua wrote about “a screaming match” in parliament, one whale of a tale framed as a political commentary to inform media consumers. (Fonua, 2015b). What did Fonua’s colourful account reveal about the country’s state of affairs and quality of deliberation in the Tongan Legislative Assembly?

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  • Energy Behaviour of SMEs in New Zealand

    Walton, Sara (2015-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    ©  2015  The  Author  

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  • Voter apathy in British elections: causes and remedies

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    The turnout for the 2001 General election in Britain was the lowest ever after full adult suffrage. This essay presents the theoretical explanations of voter apathy and then reviews the literature on the causes behind the increasing voter abstention in General elections in Britain. Finally, the measures which have been proposed in order to increase voter participation are presented and critically assessed.

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  • On the testability of BDI agent systems

    Winikoff, Michael; Cranefield, Stephen (2010-09-28)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Before deploying a software system we need to assure ourselves (and stake- holders) that the system will behave correctly. This assurance is usually done by testing the system. However, it is intuitively obvious that adaptive systems, including agent-based systems, can exhibit complex behaviour, and are thus harder to test. In this paper we examine this “obvious intuition” in the case of Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI) agents. We analyse the size of the behaviour space of BDI agents and show that although the intuition is correct, the factors that influence the size are not what we expected them to be; specifically, we found that the introduction of failure handling had a much larger effect on the size of the behaviour space than we expected. We also discuss the implications of these findings on the testability of BDI agents.

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  • A comparison of software effort prediction models using small datasets

    van Koten, Chikako (2007-05)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. If published, this version will be replaced by the final version.

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  • Colonic transit studies to measure gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Ellis, Pete M; Stanley, James; Nowitz, Mark; Dunn, Helen; Huthwaite, Mark; Grant, Eve (2013-10-30)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This is the research protocol for an observational (cross-sectional) study investigating gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients. Recruitment for this study will begin in 2014.

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  • The development of Rugby Super 12 and its implications for tourism: the case of the Otago Highlanders

    Higham, James E S; Hinch, Tom (1999-02)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the impacts of Rugby Super 12 on the tourism industry in the Otago Highlanders region. It presents the results of a qualitative programme of research for which individuals involved in the administration of Rugby Super 12 (rugby unions) and tourism development (local government and tourism promotion offices) were interviewed. A sport tourism framework is presented in this report and used to explore the impacts of sport on the spatial and temporal dimensions of tourism. The manner in which Rugby Super 12 affects travel patterns and offers potential for tourism development in the Highlanders region is then explored. Study participants felt that Rugby Super 12 has had significant implications for tourism in Southern New Zealand. It was seen as generating increased domestic travel into and within the region, attracting people who had little previous interest in rugby and encouraging international visitors to make rugby spectatorship part of their New Zealand tour itinerary. The introduction of Rugby Super 12 to the region was reported as having increased: the numbers of people travelling, their length of stay and their spending patterns. The Highlanders were also seen to present tourism development potential in terms of: • The promotion of Dunedin as an urban tourism destination (eg., floodlit night sport). • The further evolution of Carisbrook as an urban tourism icon. • The promotion of the heritage, history, lifestyles and attractions within the region. • The differentiation of the Southern Macro-region from other regions in New Zealand. • The promotion of the region as an international tourism destination through the televising of Highlanders games to international audiences. Rugby Super 12 was seen as benefiting the tourism sector within the region and offering great potential for further benefits. Capturing these benefits requires that the promotional opportunities presented by the Highlanders team (and the star players within it) be incorporated into tourism development strategies. It was also recognized that while Rugby Super 12 has had positive implications for tourism, the same is true for the impact of tourism on the Highlanders franchise. That is, the travel patterns generated by Rugby Super 12 benefit the tourism industry (people travelling further to be involved in sporting occasions) but increased tourism also benefits Otago rugby (e.g., through ground attendance, atmosphere, expanded supporter base, merchandise/ food and beverage/ season ticket sales). Additional research in this area will provide an information base upon which to make decisions that can maximize the mutual benefits of this relationship between sport and tourism.

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  • The Marketing course at Otago 1966-1990: A case study in curriculum technology, University fashions and politics

    Mueller-Heumann, Guenther (2007)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper is a case study of the development of the Marketing Management course at the University of Otago over 25 years. Key development phases and turning points in the history of the curriculum are presented and discussed. In 1966 the first Marketing Management paper at the University of Otago was taught by the then Professor of Accounting. In 1990, the Department of Marketing offered a programme which took up half of the course work for the B.Com. in Marketing Management. It had a very large number of undergraduate and postgraduate students and its staffing establishment included two chairs and more than 35 staff, some of them part-time. In such an enormous operation, academic leadership and staffing problems arise which are quite different from those of most of the small Marketing groups and departments typical for Australasian tertiary institutions.

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  • National Household Survey of Energy and Transportation: Energy Cultures Two

    Wooliscroft, Ben (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Executive Summary Key findings: • A clear picture of the state of the energy efficiency of our housing stock, our household energy behaviours and our driving (and transport) behaviours has been collected. • Four clear clusters of energy consumers are identified: – The Energy Comfortable (23.7%) have less remedial (e.g. dehumidifier) energy use. They live in warm dry houses. – The Energy Poor (21.1%) not only have the lowest incomes, they also have the lowest number of energy efficiency household modifications and practise the least number of energy saving driving behaviours. – The Energy Average (24.6%) are exactly that, exceptional in very few attributes. There are significant opportunities for them to save energy. – The Energy Efficient (24.3%) earn a similar amount to the Energy Average and the Energy Comfortable but have power bills similar to the Energy Poor. • New Zealand’s housing stock is frequently not adequately insulated or efficiently heated • Many New Zealanders do not practise energy saving behaviours around the house, including behaviour as simple as turning off lights in un-occupied rooms. This research gives insight into the frequency with which behaviours are practised. • There is considerable opportunity to save money through efficient driving (most estimates are 15%) however many efficient driving behaviours are not practised by our sample. • The earthquake in Christchurch is clearly found in the results with regard to heating, transportation and traffic issues. • Poor energy behaviour in the house is strongly related to poor driving (from an energy point of view) and a low energy efficient house. • The results would suggest that a systems approach to improving energy consumption will reap the best rewards.

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